Impact on previous findings

Warning View the most recent version.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please "contact us" to request a format other than those available.

At the national and provincial levels, the previous analytical conclusions for the period 2006 to 2009 remained unchanged.  These conclusions are highlighted below.

Reference year 2007

(Statistics Canada, 2009)

  • From 2006 to 2007, the median after-tax income rose for both Canadian families and unattached individuals.
  • Families living in Alberta had the highest median after-tax income, followed by those in Ontario and British Columbia.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador families experienced the largest growth in median after-tax income. 
  • Median market income increased for both families and unattached individuals.
  • Families of two persons or more saw a decrease in median income taxes, while their government transfers remained virtually unchanged from 2006. 
  • The low income situation in Canada improved in 2007.  The percentage of Canadians living below the after-tax low income cut offs decreased in 2007. 

Reference year 2008

(Statistics Canada, 2010)

  • Median after-tax income for Canadian families of two or more persons in 2008 was virtually unchanged from 2007.
  • Median after-tax income for families with two persons or more rose in British Columbia and Saskatchewan. In the other provinces, it was unchanged in 2008 from 2007.
  • Unattached individuals saw increases in median after-tax income in both Alberta and Manitoba, while it remained virtually unchanged in the other provinces.
  • In 2008, there was virtually no change in median market income for any of the main family types.
  • There was little difference in median government transfers compared to 2007, but transfers varied widely across different family types.
  • Median income taxes—both federal and provincial —were stable for most family types.
  • According to the after-tax low income cut-offs, the number of Canadians who lived in low income in 2008 was virtually unchanged from 2007.

Reference year 2009

(Statistics Canada, 2011c)

  • Median after-tax income for Canadian families of two or more persons was virtually unchanged from 2008.
  • After-tax income for unattached individuals remained stable, though this was not the case for all categories of unattached individuals.  For senior unattached individuals, the median rose. 
  • In most provinces, median after-tax income for families with two persons or more was unchanged between 2008 and 2009.  
  • Between 2008 and 2009, more people experienced an increase in their adjusted after-tax household income, than a decrease.
  • Median market income saw a decrease in 2009.
  • Median government transfers increased in 2009.
  • Among families of two persons or more, the median income tax paid was lower than in 2008.
  • According to the after-tax low income cut-offs, the number of Canadians who lived in low income in 2009 was virtually unchanged from 2008.
Report a problem on this page

Is something not working? Is there information outdated? Can't find what you're looking for?

Please contact us and let us know how we can help you.

Privacy notice

Date modified: