Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help

Results

All (49)

All (49) (0 to 10 of 49 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-633-X
    Description: Papers in this series provide background discussions of the methods used to develop data for economic, health, and social analytical studies at Statistics Canada. They are intended to provide readers with information on the statistical methods, standards and definitions used to develop databases for research purposes. All papers in this series have undergone peer and institutional review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.
    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800254908
    Description:

    This study examined nine national surveys of the household population which collected information about drug use during the period from 1985 through 2015. These surveys are examined for comparability. The data are used to estimate past-year (current) cannabis use (total, and by sex and age). Based on the most comparable data, trends in use from 2004 through 2015 are estimated.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700254871
    Description:

    In this paper the question is addressed how alternative data sources, such as administrative and social media data, can be used in the production of official statistics. Since most surveys at national statistical institutes are conducted repeatedly over time, a multivariate structural time series modelling approach is proposed to model the series observed by a repeated surveys with related series obtained from such alternative data sources. Generally, this improves the precision of the direct survey estimates by using sample information observed in preceding periods and information from related auxiliary series. This model also makes it possible to utilize the higher frequency of the social media to produce more precise estimates for the sample survey in real time at the moment that statistics for the social media become available but the sample data are not yet available. The concept of cointegration is applied to address the question to which extent the alternative series represent the same phenomena as the series observed with the repeated survey. The methodology is applied to the Dutch Consumer Confidence Survey and a sentiment index derived from social media.

    Release date: 2017-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114819
    Description:

    Structural time series models are a powerful technique for variance reduction in the framework of small area estimation (SAE) based on repeatedly conducted surveys. Statistics Netherlands implemented a structural time series model to produce monthly figures about the labour force with the Dutch Labour Force Survey (DLFS). Such models, however, contain unknown hyperparameters that have to be estimated before the Kalman filter can be launched to estimate state variables of the model. This paper describes a simulation aimed at studying the properties of hyperparameter estimators in the model. Simulating distributions of the hyperparameter estimators under different model specifications complements standard model diagnostics for state space models. Uncertainty around the model hyperparameters is another major issue. To account for hyperparameter uncertainty in the mean squared errors (MSE) estimates of the DLFS, several estimation approaches known in the literature are considered in a simulation. Apart from the MSE bias comparison, this paper also provides insight into the variances and MSEs of the MSE estimators considered.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2015077
    Description:

    This new dataset increases the information available for comparing the performance of provinces and territories across a range of measures. It combines often fragmented provincial time series data that, as such, are of limited utility for examining the evolution of provincial economies over extended periods. More advanced statistical methods, and models with greater breadth and depth, are difficult to apply to existing fragmented Canadian data. The longitudinal nature of the new provincial dataset remedies this shortcoming. This report explains the construction of the latest vintage of the dataset. The dataset contains the most up-to-date information available.

    Release date: 2015-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214110
    Description:

    In developing the sample design for a survey we attempt to produce a good design for the funds available. Information on costs can be used to develop sample designs that minimise the sampling variance of an estimator of total for fixed cost. Improvements in survey management systems mean that it is now sometimes possible to estimate the cost of including each unit in the sample. This paper develops relatively simple approaches to determine whether the potential gains arising from using this unit level cost information are likely to be of practical use. It is shown that the key factor is the coefficient of variation of the costs relative to the coefficient of variation of the relative error on the estimated cost coefficients.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211040
    Description:

    In this paper a multivariate structural time series model is described that accounts for the panel design of the Dutch Labour Force Survey and is applied to estimate monthly unemployment rates. Compared to the generalized regression estimator, this approach results in a substantial increase of the accuracy due to a reduction of the standard error and the explicit modelling of the bias between the subsequent waves.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200900110885
    Description:

    Peaks in the spectrum of a stationary process are indicative of the presence of stochastic periodic phenomena, such as a stochastic seasonal effect. This work proposes to measure and test for the presence of such spectral peaks via assessing their aggregate slope and convexity. Our method is developed nonparametrically, and thus may be useful during a preliminary analysis of a series. The technique is also useful for detecting the presence of residual seasonality in seasonally adjusted data. The diagnostic is investigated through simulation and an extensive case study using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    Release date: 2009-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110398
    Description:

    The study of longitudinal data is vital in terms of accurately observing changes in responses of interest for individuals, communities, and larger populations over time. Linear mixed effects models (for continuous responses observed over time) and generalized linear mixed effects models and generalized estimating equations (for more general responses such as binary or count data observed over time) are the most popular techniques used for analyzing longitudinal data from health studies, though, as with all modeling techniques, these approaches have limitations, partly due to their underlying assumptions. In this review paper, we will discuss some advances, including curve-based techniques, which make modeling longitudinal data more flexible. Three examples will be presented from the health literature utilizing these more flexible procedures, with the goal of demonstrating that some otherwise difficult questions can be reasonably answered when analyzing complex longitudinal data in population health studies.

    Release date: 2008-03-17
Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Analysis (41)

Analysis (41) (0 to 10 of 41 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-633-X
    Description: Papers in this series provide background discussions of the methods used to develop data for economic, health, and social analytical studies at Statistics Canada. They are intended to provide readers with information on the statistical methods, standards and definitions used to develop databases for research purposes. All papers in this series have undergone peer and institutional review to ensure that they conform to Statistics Canada's mandate and adhere to generally accepted standards of good professional practice.
    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201800254908
    Description:

    This study examined nine national surveys of the household population which collected information about drug use during the period from 1985 through 2015. These surveys are examined for comparability. The data are used to estimate past-year (current) cannabis use (total, and by sex and age). Based on the most comparable data, trends in use from 2004 through 2015 are estimated.

    Release date: 2018-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700254871
    Description:

    In this paper the question is addressed how alternative data sources, such as administrative and social media data, can be used in the production of official statistics. Since most surveys at national statistical institutes are conducted repeatedly over time, a multivariate structural time series modelling approach is proposed to model the series observed by a repeated surveys with related series obtained from such alternative data sources. Generally, this improves the precision of the direct survey estimates by using sample information observed in preceding periods and information from related auxiliary series. This model also makes it possible to utilize the higher frequency of the social media to produce more precise estimates for the sample survey in real time at the moment that statistics for the social media become available but the sample data are not yet available. The concept of cointegration is applied to address the question to which extent the alternative series represent the same phenomena as the series observed with the repeated survey. The methodology is applied to the Dutch Consumer Confidence Survey and a sentiment index derived from social media.

    Release date: 2017-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201700114819
    Description:

    Structural time series models are a powerful technique for variance reduction in the framework of small area estimation (SAE) based on repeatedly conducted surveys. Statistics Netherlands implemented a structural time series model to produce monthly figures about the labour force with the Dutch Labour Force Survey (DLFS). Such models, however, contain unknown hyperparameters that have to be estimated before the Kalman filter can be launched to estimate state variables of the model. This paper describes a simulation aimed at studying the properties of hyperparameter estimators in the model. Simulating distributions of the hyperparameter estimators under different model specifications complements standard model diagnostics for state space models. Uncertainty around the model hyperparameters is another major issue. To account for hyperparameter uncertainty in the mean squared errors (MSE) estimates of the DLFS, several estimation approaches known in the literature are considered in a simulation. Apart from the MSE bias comparison, this paper also provides insight into the variances and MSEs of the MSE estimators considered.

    Release date: 2017-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2015077
    Description:

    This new dataset increases the information available for comparing the performance of provinces and territories across a range of measures. It combines often fragmented provincial time series data that, as such, are of limited utility for examining the evolution of provincial economies over extended periods. More advanced statistical methods, and models with greater breadth and depth, are difficult to apply to existing fragmented Canadian data. The longitudinal nature of the new provincial dataset remedies this shortcoming. This report explains the construction of the latest vintage of the dataset. The dataset contains the most up-to-date information available.

    Release date: 2015-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201400214110
    Description:

    In developing the sample design for a survey we attempt to produce a good design for the funds available. Information on costs can be used to develop sample designs that minimise the sampling variance of an estimator of total for fixed cost. Improvements in survey management systems mean that it is now sometimes possible to estimate the cost of including each unit in the sample. This paper develops relatively simple approaches to determine whether the potential gains arising from using this unit level cost information are likely to be of practical use. It is shown that the key factor is the coefficient of variation of the costs relative to the coefficient of variation of the relative error on the estimated cost coefficients.

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200900211040
    Description:

    In this paper a multivariate structural time series model is described that accounts for the panel design of the Dutch Labour Force Survey and is applied to estimate monthly unemployment rates. Compared to the generalized regression estimator, this approach results in a substantial increase of the accuracy due to a reduction of the standard error and the explicit modelling of the bias between the subsequent waves.

    Release date: 2009-12-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200600110398
    Description:

    The study of longitudinal data is vital in terms of accurately observing changes in responses of interest for individuals, communities, and larger populations over time. Linear mixed effects models (for continuous responses observed over time) and generalized linear mixed effects models and generalized estimating equations (for more general responses such as binary or count data observed over time) are the most popular techniques used for analyzing longitudinal data from health studies, though, as with all modeling techniques, these approaches have limitations, partly due to their underlying assumptions. In this review paper, we will discuss some advances, including curve-based techniques, which make modeling longitudinal data more flexible. Three examples will be presented from the health literature utilizing these more flexible procedures, with the goal of demonstrating that some otherwise difficult questions can be reasonably answered when analyzing complex longitudinal data in population health studies.

    Release date: 2008-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2007047
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the effect of aberrant observations in the Capital, Labour, Energy, Materials and Services (KLEMS) database and a method for dealing with them. The level of disaggregation, data construction and economic shocks all potentially lead to aberrant observations that can influence estimates and inference if care is not exercised. Commonly applied pre-tests, such as the augmented Dickey-Fuller and the Kwaitkowski, Phillips, Schmidt and Shin tests, need to be used with caution in this environment because they are sensitive to unusual data points. Moreover, widely known methods for generating statistical estimates, such as Ordinary Least Squares, may not work well when confronted with aberrant observations. To address this, a robust method for estimating statistical relationships is illustrated.

    Release date: 2007-12-05
Reference (9)

Reference (9) ((9 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200900110885
    Description:

    Peaks in the spectrum of a stationary process are indicative of the presence of stochastic periodic phenomena, such as a stochastic seasonal effect. This work proposes to measure and test for the presence of such spectral peaks via assessing their aggregate slope and convexity. Our method is developed nonparametrically, and thus may be useful during a preliminary analysis of a series. The technique is also useful for detecting the presence of residual seasonality in seasonally adjusted data. The diagnostic is investigated through simulation and an extensive case study using data from the U.S. Census Bureau and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD).

    Release date: 2009-06-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015648
    Description:

    We estimate the parameters of a stochastic model for labour force careers involving distributions of correlated durations employed, unemployed (with and without job search) and not in the labour force. If the model is to account for sub-annual labour force patterns as well as advancement towards retirement, then no single data source is adequate to inform it. However, it is possible to build up an approximation from a number of different sources.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015656
    Description:

    Time series studies have shown associations between air pollution concentrations and morbidity and mortality. These studies have largely been conducted within single cities, and with varying methods. Critics of these studies have questioned the validity of the data sets used and the statistical techniques applied to them; the critics have noted inconsistencies in findings among studies and even in independent re-analyses of data from the same city. In this paper we review some of the statistical methods used to analyze a subset of a national data base of air pollution, mortality and weather assembled during the National Morbidity and Mortality Air Pollution Study (NMMAPS).

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015688
    Description:

    The geographical and temporal relationship between outdoor air pollution and asthma was examined by linking together data from multiple sources. These included the administrative records of 59 general practices widely dispersed across England and Wales for half a million patients and all their consultations for asthma, supplemented by a socio-economic interview survey. Postcode enabled linkage with: (i) computed local road density; (ii) emission estimates of sulphur dioxide and nitrogen dioxides, (iii) measured/interpolated concentration of black smoke, sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and other pollutants at practice level. Parallel Poisson time series analysis took into account between-practice variations to examine daily correlations in practices close to air quality monitoring stations. Preliminary analyses show small and generally non-significant geographical associations between consultation rates and pollution markers. The methodological issues relevant to combining such data, and the interpretation of these results will be discussed.

    Release date: 2000-03-02

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015031
    Description:

    The U.S. Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) was carried out from 1988 to 1994. This survey was intended primarily to provide estimates of cross-sectional parameters believed to be approximately constant over the six-year data collection period. However, for some variable (e.g., serum lead, body mass index and smoking behavior), substantive considerations suggest the possible presence of nontrivial changes in level between 1988 and 1994. For these variables, NHANES III is potentially a valuable source of time-change information, compared to other studies involving more restricted populations and samples. Exploration of possible change over time is complicated by two issues. First, there was of practical concern because some variables displayed substantial regional differences in level. This was of practical concern because some variables displayed substantial regional differences in level. Second, nontrivial changes in level over time can lead to nontrivial biases in some customary NHANES III variance estimators. This paper considers these two problems and discusses some related implications for statistical policy.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19980015033
    Description:

    Victimizations are not randomly scattered through the population, but tend to be concentrated in relatively few victims. Data from the U.S. National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), a multistage rotating panel survey, are employed to estimate the conditional probabilities of being a crime victim at time t given the victimization status in earlier interviews. Models are presented and fit to allow use of partial information from households that move in or out of the housing unit during the study period. The estimated probability of being a crime victim at interview t given the status at interview (t-l) is found to decrease with t. Possible implications for estimating cross-sectional victimization rates are discusssed.

    Release date: 1999-10-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980024351
    Description:

    To calculate price indexes, data on "the same item" (actually a collection of items narrowly defined) must be collected across time periods. The question arises whether such "quasi-longitudinal" data can be modeled in such a way as to shed light on what a price index is. Leading thinkers on price indexes have questioned the feasibility of using statistical modeling at all for characterizing price indexes. This paper suggests a simple state space model of price data, yielding a consumer price index that is given in terms of the parameters of the model.

    Release date: 1999-01-14

  • Notices and consultations: 62-010-X19970023422
    Description:

    The current official time base of the Consumer Price Index (CPI) is 1986=100. This time base was first used when the CPI for June 1990 was released. Statistics Canada is about to convert all price index series to the time base 1992=100. As a result, all constant dollar series will be converted to 1992 dollars. The CPI will shift to the new time base when the CPI for January 1998 is released on February 27th, 1998.

    Release date: 1997-11-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19960022979
    Description:

    This paper empirically compares three estimation methods - regression, restricted regression, and principal person - used in a household survey of consumer expenditures. The three methods are applied to post-stratification which is important in many household surveys to adjust for under-coverage of the target population. Post-stratum population counts are typically available from an external census for numbers of persons but not for numbers of households. If household estimates are needed, a single weight must be assigned to each household while using the person counts for post-stratification. This is easily accomplished with regression estimators of totals or means by using person counts in each household's auxiliary data. Restricted regression estimation refines the weights by controlling extremes and can produce estimators with lower variance than Horvitz-Thompson estimators while still adhering to the population controls. The regression methods also allow controls to be used for both person-level counts and quantitative auxiliaries. With the principal person method, persons are classified into post-strata and person weights are ratio adjusted to achieve population control totals. This leads to each person in a household potentially having a different weight. The weight associated with the "principal person" is then selected as the household weight. We will compare estimated means from the three methods and their estimated standard errors for a number of expenditures from the Consumer Expenditure survey sponsored by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

    Release date: 1997-01-30
Date modified: