Quality assurance

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All (238) (0 to 10 of 238 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0002M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research.

    Release date: 2018-04-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-604-M2018087
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2018-03-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-606-X
    Description:

    This is a toolkit intended to aid data producers and data users external to Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91F0015M2017013
    Description:

    Using records linkage, this article compares the place of residence in the 2011 Census to that of the 2010 T1 Family File (T1FF). The main result is that although the overall level of consistency in the place of residence is relatively high, it decreases, sometimes substantially, for some segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-09-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201711116381
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-04-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-586-X
    Description:

    The Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) serves as the highest-level governance tool for quality management at Statistics Canada. The QAF gives an overview of the quality management and risk mitigation strategies used by the Agency’s program areas. The QAF is used in conjunction with Statistics Canada management practices, such as those described in the Quality Guidelines.

    Release date: 2017-04-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014711
    Description:

    After the 2010 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau conducted two separate research projects matching survey data to databases. One study matched to the third-party database Accurint, and the other matched to U.S. Postal Service National Change of Address (NCOA) files. In both projects, we evaluated response error in reported move dates by comparing the self-reported move date to records in the database. We encountered similar challenges in the two projects. This paper discusses our experience using “big data” as a comparison source for survey data and our lessons learned for future projects similar to the ones we conducted.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014716
    Description:

    Administrative data, depending on its source and original purpose, can be considered a more reliable source of information than survey-collected data. It does not require a respondent to be present and understand question wording, and it is not limited by the respondent’s ability to recall events retrospectively. This paper compares selected survey data, such as demographic variables, from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to various administrative sources for which LISA has linkage agreements in place. The agreement between data sources, and some factors that might affect it, are analyzed for various aspects of the survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24
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  • Journals and periodicals: 75F0002M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research.

    Release date: 2018-04-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-604-M2018087
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2018-03-22

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X201711116381
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014711
    Description:

    After the 2010 Census, the U.S. Census Bureau conducted two separate research projects matching survey data to databases. One study matched to the third-party database Accurint, and the other matched to U.S. Postal Service National Change of Address (NCOA) files. In both projects, we evaluated response error in reported move dates by comparing the self-reported move date to records in the database. We encountered similar challenges in the two projects. This paper discusses our experience using “big data” as a comparison source for survey data and our lessons learned for future projects similar to the ones we conducted.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014722
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau is researching ways to incorporate administrative data in decennial census and survey operations. Critical to this work is an understanding of the coverage of the population by administrative records. Using federal and third party administrative data linked to the American Community Survey (ACS), we evaluate the extent to which administrative records provide data on foreign-born individuals in the ACS and employ multinomial logistic regression techniques to evaluate characteristics of those who are in administrative records relative to those who are not. We find that overall, administrative records provide high coverage of foreign-born individuals in our sample for whom a match can be determined. The odds of being in administrative records are found to be tied to the processes of immigrant assimilation – naturalization, higher English proficiency, educational attainment, and full-time employment are associated with greater odds of being in administrative records. These findings suggest that as immigrants adapt and integrate into U.S. society, they are more likely to be involved in government and commercial processes and programs for which we are including data. We further explore administrative records coverage for the two largest race/ethnic groups in our sample – Hispanic and non-Hispanic single-race Asian foreign born, finding again that characteristics related to assimilation are associated with administrative records coverage for both groups. However, we observe that neighborhood context impacts Hispanics and Asians differently.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014723
    Description:

    The U.S. Census Bureau is researching uses of administrative records in survey and decennial operations in order to reduce costs and respondent burden while preserving data quality. One potential use of administrative records is to utilize the data when race and Hispanic origin responses are missing. When federal and third party administrative records are compiled, race and Hispanic origin responses are not always the same for an individual across different administrative records sources. We explore different sets of business rules used to assign one race and one Hispanic response when these responses are discrepant across sources. We also describe the characteristics of individuals with matching, non-matching, and missing race and Hispanic origin data across several demographic, household, and contextual variables. We find that minorities, especially Hispanics, are more likely to have non-matching Hispanic origin and race responses in administrative records than in the 2010 Census. Hispanics are less likely to have missing Hispanic origin data but more likely to have missing race data in administrative records. Non-Hispanic Asians and non-Hispanic Pacific Islanders are more likely to have missing race and Hispanic origin data in administrative records. Younger individuals, renters, individuals living in households with two or more people, individuals who responded to the census in the nonresponse follow-up operation, and individuals residing in urban areas are more likely to have non-matching race and Hispanic origin responses.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014724
    Description:

    At the Institut national de santé publique du Québec, the Quebec Integrated Chronic Disease Surveillance System (QICDSS) has been used daily for approximately four years. The benefits of this system are numerous for measuring the extent of diseases more accurately, evaluating the use of health services properly and identifying certain groups at risk. However, in the past months, various problems have arisen that have required a great deal of careful thought. The problems have affected various areas of activity, such as data linkage, data quality, coordinating multiple users and meeting legal obligations. The purpose of this presentation is to describe the main challenges associated with using QICDSS data and to present some possible solutions. In particular, this presentation discusses the processing of five data sources that not only come from five different sources, but also are not mainly used for chronic disease surveillance. The varying quality of the data, both across files and within a given file, will also be discussed. Certain situations associated with the simultaneous use of the system by multiple users will also be examined. Examples will be given of analyses of large data sets that have caused problems. As well, a few challenges involving disclosure and the fulfillment of legal agreements will be briefly discussed.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014743
    Description:

    Probabilistic linkage is susceptible to linkage errors such as false positives and false negatives. In many cases, these errors may be reliably measured through clerical-reviews, i.e. the visual inspection of a sample of record pairs to determine if they are matched. A framework is described to effectively carry-out such clerical-reviews based on a probabilistic sample of pairs, repeated independent reviews of the same pairs and latent class analysis to account for clerical errors.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X201700014758
    Description:

    "Several Canadian jurisdictions including Ontario are using patient-based healthcare data in their funding models. These initiatives can influence the quality of this data both positively and negatively as people tend to pay more attention to the data and its quality when financial decisions are based upon it. Ontario’s funding formula uses data from several national databases housed at the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI). These databases provide information on patient activity and clinical status across the continuum of care. As funding models may influence coding behaviour, CIHI is collaborating with the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care to assess and monitor the quality of this data. CIHI is using data mining software and modelling techniques (that are often associated with “big data”) to identify data anomalies across multiple factors. The models identify what the “typical” clinical coding patterns are for key patient groups (for example, patients seen in special care units or discharged to home care), so that outliers can be identified, where patients do not fit the expected pattern. A key component of the modelling is segmenting the data based on patient, provider and hospital characteristics to take into account key differences in the delivery of health care and patient populations across the province. CIHI’s analysis identified several hospitals with coding practices that appear to be changing or significantly different from their peer group. Further investigation is required to understand why these differences exist and to develop appropriate strategies to mitigate variations. "

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201600114307
    Description:

    Using the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study examined the psychometric properties of the 10-item Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (a short measure of non-specific psychological distress) for First Nations people living off reserve, Métis, and Inuit aged 15 or older.

    Release date: 2016-01-20
Reference (80)

Reference (80) (0 to 10 of 80 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-606-X
    Description:

    This is a toolkit intended to aid data producers and data users external to Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2017-09-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91F0015M2017013
    Description:

    Using records linkage, this article compares the place of residence in the 2011 Census to that of the 2010 T1 Family File (T1FF). The main result is that although the overall level of consistency in the place of residence is relatively high, it decreases, sometimes substantially, for some segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-09-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-586-X
    Description:

    The Quality Assurance Framework (QAF) serves as the highest-level governance tool for quality management at Statistics Canada. The QAF gives an overview of the quality management and risk mitigation strategies used by the Agency’s program areas. The QAF is used in conjunction with Statistics Canada management practices, such as those described in the Quality Guidelines.

    Release date: 2017-04-21

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014707
    Description:

    The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a monthly household survey of about 56,000 households that provides information on the Canadian labour market. Audit Trail is a Blaise programming option, for surveys like LFS with Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI), which creates files containing every keystroke and edit and timestamp of every data collection attempt on all households. Combining such a large survey with such a complete source of paradata opens the door to in-depth data quality analysis but also quickly leads to Big Data challenges. How can meaningful information be extracted from this large set of keystrokes and timestamps? How can it help assess the quality of LFS data collection? The presentation will describe some of the challenges that were encountered, solutions that were used to address them, and results of the analysis on data quality.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014716
    Description:

    Administrative data, depending on its source and original purpose, can be considered a more reliable source of information than survey-collected data. It does not require a respondent to be present and understand question wording, and it is not limited by the respondent’s ability to recall events retrospectively. This paper compares selected survey data, such as demographic variables, from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to various administrative sources for which LISA has linkage agreements in place. The agreement between data sources, and some factors that might affect it, are analyzed for various aspects of the survey.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014717
    Description:

    Files with linked data from the Statistics Canada, Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) and tax data can be used to examine the trajectories of students who pursue postsecondary education (PSE) programs and their post-schooling labour market outcomes. On one hand, administrative data on students linked longitudinally can provide aggregate information on student pathways during postsecondary studies such as persistence rates, graduation rates, mobility, etc. On the other hand, the tax data could supplement the PSIS data to provide information on employment outcomes such as average and median earnings or earnings progress by employment sector (industry), field of study, education level and/or other demographic information, year over year after graduation. Two longitudinal pilot studies have been done using administrative data on postsecondary students of Maritimes institutions which have been longitudinally linked and linked to Statistics Canada Ttx data (the T1 Family File) for relevant years. This article first focuses on the quality of information in the administrative data and the methodology used to conduct these longitudinal studies and derive indicators. Second, it will focus on some limitations when using administrative data, rather than a survey, to define some concepts.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014725
    Description:

    Tax data are being used more and more to measure and analyze the population and its characteristics. One of the issues raised by the growing use of these type of data relates to the definition of the concept of place of residence. While the census uses the traditional concept of place of residence, tax data provide information based on the mailing address of tax filers. Using record linkage between the census, the National Household Survey and tax data from the T1 Family File, this study examines the consistency level of the place of residence of these two sources and its associated characteristics.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X201700014726
    Description:

    Internal migration is one of the components of population growth estimated at Statistics Canada. It is estimated by comparing individuals’ addresses at the beginning and end of a given period. The Canada Child Tax Benefit and T1 Family File are the primary data sources used. Address quality and coverage of more mobile subpopulations are crucial to producing high-quality estimates. The purpose of this article is to present the results of evaluations of these elements using access to more tax data sources at Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 2016-03-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X201200111680
    Description:

    Survey data are potentially affected by interviewer falsifications with data fabrication being the most blatant form. Even a small number of fabricated interviews might seriously impair the results of further empirical analysis. Besides reinterviews, some statistical approaches have been proposed for identifying this type of fraudulent behaviour. With the help of a small dataset, this paper demonstrates how cluster analysis, which is not commonly employed in this context, might be used to identify interviewers who falsify their work assignments. Several indicators are combined to classify 'at risk' interviewers based solely on the data collected. This multivariate classification seems superior to the application of a single indicator such as Benford's law.

    Release date: 2012-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2011001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2009 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2011-06-16
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