Employment and unemployment

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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200800110614
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) produces monthly estimates of the unemployment rate at national and provincial levels. The LFS also releases unemployment estimates for sub-provincial areas such as Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Urban Centers (UCs). However, for some sub-provincial areas, the direct estimates are not reliable since the sample size in some areas is quite small. The small area estimation in LFS concerns estimation of unemployment rates for local sub-provincial areas such as CMA/UCs using small area models. In this paper, we will discuss various models including the Fay-Herriot model and cross-sectional and time series models. In particular, an integrated non-linear mixed effects model will be proposed under the hierarchical Bayes (HB) framework for the LFS unemployment rate estimation. Monthly Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiary data at the CMA/UC level are used as auxiliary covariates in the model. A HB approach with the Gibbs sampling method is used to obtain the estimates of posterior means and posterior variances of the CMA/UC level unemployment rates. The proposed HB model leads to reliable model-based estimates in terms of CV reduction. Model fit analysis and comparison of the model-based estimates with the direct estimates are presented in the paper.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This activity focuses on the contribution of immigrants to Canadian agriculture, highlighting which countries they come from and why, and what types of farms they prefer.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X19960042907
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The employment/population ratio is a good barometer of the state of the economy and an important though little-used labour market indicator. This article takes a look at the ratio's strengths and limitations, as well as its variation since 1946. Provincial and international comparisons are included.

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0019M1995083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the robustness of a measure of the average complete duration of unemployment in Canada to a host of assumptions used in its derivation. In contrast to the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is a lagging cyclical indicator, this statistic is a coincident indicator of the business cycle. The impact of using a steady state as opposed to a non steady state assumption, as well as the impact of various corrections for response bias are explored. It is concluded that a non steady state estimator would be a valuable compliment to the statistics on unemployment duration that are currently released by many statistical agencies, and particularly Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X1992004140
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study illustrates quarterly trends in unemployment rates based on alternative measures. By all of the indicators studies there was an overall increase in unemployment during the early 1990s.

    Release date: 1992-12-01
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Reference (5)

Reference (5) ((5 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200800110614
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Labour Force Survey (LFS) produces monthly estimates of the unemployment rate at national and provincial levels. The LFS also releases unemployment estimates for sub-provincial areas such as Census Metropolitan Areas (CMAs) and Urban Centers (UCs). However, for some sub-provincial areas, the direct estimates are not reliable since the sample size in some areas is quite small. The small area estimation in LFS concerns estimation of unemployment rates for local sub-provincial areas such as CMA/UCs using small area models. In this paper, we will discuss various models including the Fay-Herriot model and cross-sectional and time series models. In particular, an integrated non-linear mixed effects model will be proposed under the hierarchical Bayes (HB) framework for the LFS unemployment rate estimation. Monthly Employment Insurance (EI) beneficiary data at the CMA/UC level are used as auxiliary covariates in the model. A HB approach with the Gibbs sampling method is used to obtain the estimates of posterior means and posterior variances of the CMA/UC level unemployment rates. The proposed HB model leads to reliable model-based estimates in terms of CV reduction. Model fit analysis and comparison of the model-based estimates with the direct estimates are presented in the paper.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 96-328-M2004022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This activity focuses on the contribution of immigrants to Canadian agriculture, highlighting which countries they come from and why, and what types of farms they prefer.

    Release date: 2005-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X19960042907
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The employment/population ratio is a good barometer of the state of the economy and an important though little-used labour market indicator. This article takes a look at the ratio's strengths and limitations, as well as its variation since 1946. Provincial and international comparisons are included.

    Release date: 1996-12-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0019M1995083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the robustness of a measure of the average complete duration of unemployment in Canada to a host of assumptions used in its derivation. In contrast to the average incomplete duration of unemployment, which is a lagging cyclical indicator, this statistic is a coincident indicator of the business cycle. The impact of using a steady state as opposed to a non steady state assumption, as well as the impact of various corrections for response bias are explored. It is concluded that a non steady state estimator would be a valuable compliment to the statistics on unemployment duration that are currently released by many statistical agencies, and particularly Statistics Canada.

    Release date: 1995-12-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75-001-X1992004140
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study illustrates quarterly trends in unemployment rates based on alternative measures. By all of the indicators studies there was an overall increase in unemployment during the early 1990s.

    Release date: 1992-12-01
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