Pension plans and funds

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  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20202313631
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-08-18

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20193474775
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2019-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019001
    Description:

    What is the effect of having an employer-sponsored pension plan (EPP) on financial performance in non-workplace investments? This paper offers new insight into this unresolved empirical issue, using administrative data on over 345,000 taxfilers from Canada.

    Release date: 2019-01-14

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015003
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends examines the changes in pension coverage for men and women in the 20th century.

    Release date: 2015-03-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114134
    Description:

    This study compares the wealth holdings of family units covered by workplace pension plans with those of other family units. It focuses on families and unattached individuals who had no significant business equity and whose major income recipient was aged 30 to 54 and employed as a paid worker. The paper also examines whether wealth differences observed between families with registered pension plan (RPP) assets and other families persist when key sociodemographic differences between the two populations are taken into account.

    Release date: 2015-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201400114120
    Description:

    This study examines the characteristics of Canadian workers aged 25 to 54 who are covered by defined benefit (DB) registered pension plans (RPPs) as well as those covered by defined contribution RPPs or hybrid plans. It does so by taking advantage of new data from the new Longitudinal and International Survey of Adults (LISA), first conducted in 2012.

    Release date: 2014-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010811331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which family income of individuals in their mid-fifties is 'replaced' by other sources of income during the retirement years. It does so by tracking various cohorts of tax filers as they age from their mid-fifties to their late seventies and over. Earlier work examined this question for the 50% of the population with strong labour market attachment during their mid-fifties. This paper extends that work to include 80% to 85% of the population.

    Release date: 2010-08-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010327
    Description:

    Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the earnings replacement rates achieved in retirement by a sample of married and common-law couples in which the husband was aged 55 to 57 in 1991. Emphasis is placed on the outcomes experienced by couples in which one spouse or both spouses had registered pension plan (RPP) coverage and by couples without RPP coverage. The earnings replacement rates achieved by couples without RPP coverage are more widely dispersed than those of couples with RPP coverage. When compared at the mid-points of the pre-retirement earnings distributions, the median earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are about three to six percentage points lower than those of couples with RPP coverage. In contrast, the average earnings replacement rates of couples without RPP coverage are generally six to twelve percentage points higher than those of couples with RPP coverage.

    Release date: 2010-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2010326
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In spite of the importance of registered pension plans (RPPs) in discussions of Canada's retirement income system, very few Canadian studies have examined the financial outcomes experienced by RPP members and RPP non-members. Using data from the Longitudinal Administrative Database (LAD), this paper compares the distributions of earnings replacement rates achieved by retired men who were or were not members of a registered pension plan (RPP) in 1991 and/or 1992. The distributions of earnings replacement rates of men who were not RPP members are far more dispersed than those of men who were RPP members. And while the average earnings replacement rates of the two groups are generally comparable, the median earnings replacement rates of RPP non-members are lower than those of RPP members as a result of asymmetry in the distributions.

    Release date: 2010-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009321
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from the Longitudinal Administrative Data (LAD) base are used to compare the retirement status and earnings replacement rates achieved by individuals who were, and individuals who were not, Registered Pension Plan members in 1991 and/or 1992, when they were in their mid-fifties. Among men in this cohort, the likelihood of being retired at age 70 to 72 was about 4 to 14 percentage points higher among pension plan members than non-members. Data used for the study do not provide information on why RPP non-members tend to retire later than do members. Among retired individuals, earnings replacement rates did not differ significantly between RPP members and non-members.

    Release date: 2009-12-23
Reference (8)

Reference (8) ((8 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20000018519
    Description:

    With the release of the first quarter 2000 of the National Income and Expenditure Accounts the sectoring of federal and provincial government, non-autonomous pension plans has changed. These pension plans are now part of the personal sector. Previously these plans were included in either the federal or provincial government sector accounts.

    Release date: 2000-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2607
    Description: The purpose of this survey is to collect quarterly financial information on the revenues, expenditures and assets of trusteed pension funds. Within Statistics Canada, these data are used as input to the System of National Accounts.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2608
    Description: The purpose of this biennial survey is to collect financial information on the revenues, expenditures and assets of trusteed pension funds. Within Statistics Canada, the data collected by the Census of Trusteed Pension Fund (CTPF) are used to calculate estimates for the entire trusteed universe and update the sample for the Quarterly Survey of Trusteed Pension Funds (Record number: 2607).

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 2609
    Description: The purpose of the survey is to provide information on the terms and conditions of Registered Pension Plans (RPPs), membership in them and contributions made by and on behalf of the members.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5013
    Description: The retirement savings data file provides information on the number of Canadians participating in an employer-sponsored pension plans (e.g.registered pension plans (RPPs) and deferred profit sharing plans (DPSPs)) and contributing to registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs) for the taxation year.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5220
    Description: The Pension Fund Services Price Index (PFSPI) measures quarterly price changes over time for pension fund services in Canada.
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