Residential construction and investment

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Data (65)

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Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20222163592
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2022-08-04

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202220918843
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2022-07-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202219519277
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2022-07-14

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X20213213677
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2021-11-17

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020050
    Description:

    This infographic examines key housing markets in Canada prior to COVID-19 and offers an outlook of the impacts of the pandemic on the real estate market over the next few months. Price trends for four property types, such as new houses, new condominiums, resale houses and resale condominiums are explored. Prior to COVID-19, the price of condominium apartments increased at a faster pace than single, semi-detached and row homes. Since the beginning of the pandemic, many changes have been impacting the real estate industry, from virtual tours to a change in preference towards larger homes in the suburb. We offer an outlook of the impact of those new realities on the real estate market going forward.

    Release date: 2020-07-21

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019054
    Description:

    A dream of many Canadians is to someday own their own home. Canadians work hard to achieve this goal and most take on debt for that reason. Using data from the Survey on Financial Security, this infographic describes trends in homeownership and mortgage debt from 1999 to 2016.

    Release date: 2019-08-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018048
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Patterns of investment in British Columbia residential property by non-individuals and non-residents of Canada for 2018.

    Release date: 2018-12-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018049
    Description:

    Patterns of investment in Ontario residential property by non-individuals and non-residents of Canada for 2018.

    Release date: 2018-12-11

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018050
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Patterns of investment in Nova Scotia residential property by non-individuals and non-residents of Canada for 2018.

    Release date: 2018-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2001015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Canadian Consumer Price Index (CPI) applies a version of the user cost approach to measure the cost of home ownership. Because this approach specifically estimates the costs of using owned accommodation and not those faced by tenants, the measure includes a "replacement cost" (or depreciation) component. Depreciation is the only component in the CPI that is not an out-of-pocket expense. Consequently, economists face a unique set of methodological challenges when measuring depreciation.

    Between 1949 and 1997, the annual housing depreciation rate used in the CPI was 2%. Statistics Canada adopted the rate from a study that analysed U.S. Federal Housing Administration field appraisal data from 1939.

    This study argues that there is evidence that the 2% depreciation rate is too high to continue to use in the future. Consider that: 1) other Canadian studies show an upper bound of 1.7%, with a median estimate of 1.5%; 2) other statistical agencies use lower rates; and 3) every academic study over the past 40 years has arrived at a lower rate. As a consequence of this study and the existing supporting evidence, the depreciation rate in the Canadian CPI was lowered to 1.5% effective January 1998.

    Release date: 2001-11-28
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5155
    Description: The monthly investment in new housing construction represents the spending value for individuals, enterprises and governments in the construction of new residential dwellings during the reference period. The four dwelling types covered are singles, doubles,rows and apartments.
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