Productivity accounts

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  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity analysis is one of the major foundations of the analysis of long-term economic growth. It is important to study productivity in order to identify the factors that contribute to it and to explore the relationship that exists between productivity, growth and international competitiveness.

    Statistics Canada produces partial productivity indexes for some 30 industries and the business sector of the economy on an annual basis. However, little is known about the real output, productivity, and price trends in the construction industry. Four opportunities for productivity research in the construction industry are evident, (a) investigation of the available productivity measures, (b) alternative approaches to the implicit methods currently used in the compilation of output price indexes, (c) estimation of productivity within particular sectors of the construction industry, and (d) comparison of productivity on an interprovincial or international basis.

    In this paper we will focus on the first two of the four alternatives and will give examples of the last two. In particular, by formalizing the adjustments that are made to the input factors used in the development of output indexes, we contend that the result will be more impartial and enduring. Generally, our goal is to investigate and promote measures that will be available and attractive to the construction industry as it begins to demand more electronic information. The purpose is to derive, eventually, some new productivity estimates based upon the best available statistics.

    Release date: 1997-05-05
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  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1996003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Productivity analysis is one of the major foundations of the analysis of long-term economic growth. It is important to study productivity in order to identify the factors that contribute to it and to explore the relationship that exists between productivity, growth and international competitiveness.

    Statistics Canada produces partial productivity indexes for some 30 industries and the business sector of the economy on an annual basis. However, little is known about the real output, productivity, and price trends in the construction industry. Four opportunities for productivity research in the construction industry are evident, (a) investigation of the available productivity measures, (b) alternative approaches to the implicit methods currently used in the compilation of output price indexes, (c) estimation of productivity within particular sectors of the construction industry, and (d) comparison of productivity on an interprovincial or international basis.

    In this paper we will focus on the first two of the four alternatives and will give examples of the last two. In particular, by formalizing the adjustments that are made to the input factors used in the development of output indexes, we contend that the result will be more impartial and enduring. Generally, our goal is to investigate and promote measures that will be available and attractive to the construction industry as it begins to demand more electronic information. The purpose is to derive, eventually, some new productivity estimates based upon the best available statistics.

    Release date: 1997-05-05
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