Low income families

Filter results by

Search Help
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Geography

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Survey or statistical program

3 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.
Sort Help

Results

All (15)

All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016012
    Description:

    This Census in Brief examines children younger than 18 living in low-income households in 2015. It sheds light on the incidence of low income for Canadian children of different ages, across different family circumstances and household living arrangements. It also provides information on child low income at different levels of geography, including provinces, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Table: 11-10-0001-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 109-0001)
    Description:

    This table contains 166 series, with data for years 1996 - 1996 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released.

    Release date: 2017-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014002
    Description:

    Statistics that depict the movements in the bottom end of the income distribution, such as the proportion of low-income persons exiting low income from one year to the next, provide important information for developing policy on poverty and income inequality. Since the mid 1990s, these statistics have been generated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The longitudinal component of the SLID was discontinued in 2010. This paper examines new and alternative time series on low income dynamics that can be created using the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014003
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513210
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There was almost no change in the proportion of children under age 18 living in a low-income family from 1989 to 2004, despite government interventions and a strong economy since the 1990/1992 recession. In addition, the disparity between well-off and low-income children increased, the economic situation of families of well-off children having improved. Family situation and parents, insufficient employment had the greatest influence on children's vulnerability to low income. It is a changing phenomenon, as few children remain in low income for several consecutive years.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This release of the 2001 Census data focuses on the income of Canadian families. The analysis compares median family income in 1980, 1990 and 2000 and examines how the share of family income that comes from government transfers has changed over these two decades. In addition, it provides a detailed description of the distribution of Canadian family income in 2000 and looks at how incomes have changed for families at the high, low, and middle of the income distribution in the past decade. Finally, the report examines low-income among Canada's children and senior population. All of the analyses are done at the national level, but selected variables are examined at the provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Stats in brief: 98-200-X2016012
    Description:

    This Census in Brief examines children younger than 18 living in low-income households in 2015. It sheds light on the incidence of low income for Canadian children of different ages, across different family circumstances and household living arrangements. It also provides information on child low income at different levels of geography, including provinces, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations.

    Release date: 2017-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014002
    Description:

    Statistics that depict the movements in the bottom end of the income distribution, such as the proportion of low-income persons exiting low income from one year to the next, provide important information for developing policy on poverty and income inequality. Since the mid 1990s, these statistics have been generated using data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The longitudinal component of the SLID was discontinued in 2010. This paper examines new and alternative time series on low income dynamics that can be created using the Longitudinal Administrative Databank (LAD).

    Release date: 2014-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2014003
    Description:

    In order to provide a holographic or complete picture of low income, Statistics Canada uses three complementary low income lines: the Low Income Cut-offs (LICOs), the Low Income Measures (LIMs) and the Market Basket Measure (MBM). While the first two lines were developed by Statistics Canada, the MBM is based on concepts developed by Employment and Social Development Canada. Though these measures differ from one another, they give a generally consistent picture of low income status over time. None of these measures is the best. Each contributes its own perspective and its own strengths to the study of low income, so that cumulatively, the three provide a better understanding of the phenomenon of low income as a whole. These measures are not measures of poverty, but strictly measures of low income.

    Release date: 2014-12-10

  • Stats in brief: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810513210
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    There was almost no change in the proportion of children under age 18 living in a low-income family from 1989 to 2004, despite government interventions and a strong economy since the 1990/1992 recession. In addition, the disparity between well-off and low-income children increased, the economic situation of families of well-off children having improved. Family situation and parents, insufficient employment had the greatest influence on children's vulnerability to low income. It is a changing phenomenon, as few children remain in low income for several consecutive years.

    Release date: 2008-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

  • Articles and reports: 96F0030X2001014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This release of the 2001 Census data focuses on the income of Canadian families. The analysis compares median family income in 1980, 1990 and 2000 and examines how the share of family income that comes from government transfers has changed over these two decades. In addition, it provides a detailed description of the distribution of Canadian family income in 2000 and looks at how incomes have changed for families at the high, low, and middle of the income distribution in the past decade. Finally, the report examines low-income among Canada's children and senior population. All of the analyses are done at the national level, but selected variables are examined at the provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels.

    This series includes a number of comprehensive articles that supplement the day-of-release information launched through The Daily. These catalogued articles provide an analytical perspective on the 2001 Census release topics. The number and length of these articles vary for each census release and are based on the 21 census release topics disseminated over 8 major release dates.

    More focused articles were disseminated as major releases in The Dailyin the weeks following the official release of the data. Other more specialized articles were also announced in The Daily. The articles in the 2001 Census Analysis Series are available free of charge via the Internet.

    Release date: 2003-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000144
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this paper, we revisit trends in low-income among Canadian children by taking advantage of recent developments in the measurement of low-income intensity. We focus in particular on the Sen-Shorrocks-Thon (SST) index and its elaboration by Osberg and Xu. Low-income intensity declined in the 1980s but rose in the 1990s. Declining earnings put upward pressure on low-income levels over much of the period. Higher transfers more than offset this pressure in the 1980s and continued to absorb a substantial share of the increase through 1993. In contrast, the rise in low-income intensity after 1993 reflected reductions in UI and social assistance benefits that were not offset by increased employment earnings, at least to 1996 the latest year used in this paper.

    A major aim of the paper is methodological. We contrast results using the SST index with results produced by the more familiar low-income rate, the usual measure for indexing low-income trends. The low-income rate is embedded in the SST index, but unlike the index, the rate incorporates only partial information on the distribution of low-income. Consequently, the low-income rate is generally unable to detect the changes we describe and this is true irrespective of the choice of low-income cut-off. Compared to the low-income intensity measure, the rate is also relatively insensitive to changes in transfer payments and employment earnings.

    Release date: 2000-03-30
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: