Entry, exit, mergers and growth

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All (82) (50 to 60 of 82 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2005005
    Description:

    This working paper illustrates the industries and communities that have the highest proportions of quickly growing small firms. It provides an estimate of the number of small companies that have grown to medium-sized between 1995 and 2000. The data analysed in this paper are from the LEAP-SAF (Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program: Small Area File), a synthetic database constructed from various administrative sources.

    Release date: 2005-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20030017710
    Description:

    This paper presents a probabilistic model which estimates the number of enterprises in different strata and applies logistic regression to estimate the probability of companies' activity statuses based on a survey on existence.

    Release date: 2005-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040107420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents measures of the extent of renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker. Renewal occurs when old plants are supplanted by new plants or when some plants decline and others grow. In both cases, resources used in production are being shifted from less productive to more productive plants.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2004008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the extent of economic renewal in Canada's manufacturing sector over a four-decade period, 1961 to 1999, which roughly represents the productive lifetime of a worker.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004023
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper measures the degree of job renewal in Canadian manufacturing as a whole and across provinces. This study uses a longitudinal microdata set that covers the population of manufacturing plants in Canada from 1973 to 1996.

    Release date: 2004-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2004021
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of plant turnover on productivity growth and outlines how this contribution has changed in Canada as a result of substantial trade liberalization in the 1990s.

    Release date: 2004-07-22

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004220
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses the 1993 to 2000 Exporter Registry of Statistics Canada to study the factors determining the success or exit of Canadian establishments on foreign markets. The survival analysis model is adopted to study the survival and hazard rates of exporting establishments, with the Cox proportional hazards regression used for the econometric analysis.

    Release date: 2004-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004205
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper considers the implications of changing trade barriers on the survival of Canadian manufacturing firms. A segmented market Cournot model was developed to describe the effects of trade liberalization for heterogeneous firms operating in diverse industries. The predictions of this model are tested empirically using firm-level data for both public and private corporations and tariff rates for both Canada and the United States. Our findings suggest that Canadian tariff reductions decreased the probability of the survival of Canadian firms while declines in American tariffs increased the probability. Combining these two effects, firms in two-thirds of Canadian manufacturing industries saw their probability of survival increase as a result of the tariff reductions mandated by the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement. However, the sensitivity of individual firms to tariff changes was mitigated by the characteristics of those firms. In particular, productivity and leverage played substantial roles in determining a firm's vulnerability to failure as a result of trade liberalization.

    Release date: 2004-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003202
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors underlying firm failure, and compares the failure mechanisms for young firms against those of older organizations. This paper suggests that there are systematic differences between the determinants of firm failure for firms that fail early in life and those that fail after having successfully negotiated the early liabilities of newness and adolescence. Data from 339 Canadian corporate bankruptcies confirm that younger firms fail because of inadequacies in managerial knowledge and financial management abilities. On the other hand, older firms are more likely to fail because of an inability to adapt to environmental change.

    Release date: 2003-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003193
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction of the contribution of plant turnover to productivity growth is due to multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms closing down and opening up new plants. The plants opened up by multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms are typically much more productive than those opened by single-plant or domestic-controlled.

    Release date: 2003-04-02
Data (16)

Data (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Table: 33-10-0165-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0013)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Quarterly
    Description:

    This table contains 170 series, with data for years 2000 - 2017 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (10 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of exits; Entry rate; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (17 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...).

    Release date: 2020-01-13

  • Table: 33-10-0087-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0007)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Counts of Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by North American Industry Classification System, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Table: 33-10-0088-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0008)
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Entrants, Incumbents, and Exits by firm size, for each province and territory from the Longitudinal Employment Analysis Program.
    Release date: 2019-11-22

  • Table: 33-10-0164-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 527-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description:

    This table contains 2736 series, with data starting from 2001 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (1 item: Canada) Business dynamics measure (16 items: Number of active employer businesses in the private sector; Number of entrants; Number of incumbents; Number of exits; ...) North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) (19 items: Private sector; Agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting; Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction; Utilities; ...) Firm size (9 items: Private sector; From 0 to less than 100 employees; From 0 to less than 50 employees; Less than 5 employees; ...).

    Release date: 2019-06-10

  • Table: 33-10-0176-01
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada, Province or territory
    Frequency: Occasional
    Description:

    Percentage of enterprises for which specific events occurred in the main geographical market, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code and enterprise size, based on a one-year observation period. Specific events include entry of new competitor(s), exit of competitor(s), increase in competitive behaviour from existing competitors, and decrease in competitive behaviour from existing competitors.

    Release date: 2019-03-13

  • Table: 33-10-0136-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0001)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Active enterprises with one or more employees, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0137-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0002)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise births, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0138-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0003)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Employer enterprise deaths, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0139-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0004)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived one year, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07

  • Table: 33-10-0140-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 529-0005)
    Geography: Canada
    Frequency: Annual
    Description: Number of employer enterprises newly born having survived two years, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) and enterprise size.
    Release date: 2015-12-07
Analysis (64)

Analysis (64) (20 to 30 of 64 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2009056
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the characteristics of plants in the manufacturing sector undergoing changes in ownership to further our understanding of the underlying causes of mergers and acquisitions. Previous Canadian studies (Baldwin 1995; Baldwin and Caves 1991) compare the performance of merged plants at the beginning and the end of the 1970s. This paper examines annual changes that occurred over the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s to provide a longer-run perspective. In doing so, it outlines the amount of change taking place (both the number of plants affected and the share of employment) and the characteristics of plants that led to their takeover. Differences between foreign and domestic takeovers are also examined.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2008002
    Description:

    This paper is based on the findings of the Survey of Technology and Electronic Commerce (SECT), which in 2005 included a module on business incubation service providers and users. The results of the Survey of Business Incubators (SBI) were discussed in Joseph, Bordt and Hamdani (2006). The main difference between the two surveys is that the SBI focused on business incubators (BIs), firms that provided business incubation as their main line of activity the criterion used to define industry boundaries in statistical systems whereas the SECT covered all firms that provided business incubation services to new companies, whether it was their main activity or a small part of the business.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We model the effects of product market competition on agency costs, and develop two main empirical predictions. First, competition, by reducing agency costs, unambiguously increases the importance firms place on quality improvements. This leads to higher powered incentives, and in turn to increased effort and quality. Second, these effects are increasing in the severity of agency problems, and should be stronger in large, hierarchical corporations (where agency problems are more severe) than in entrepreneurial firms. We test the predictions of our model using a unique dataset with both firm and employee characteristics.

    Release date: 2006-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060109500
    Geography: Canada, Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    The number and rate of bankruptcies have fallen steadily since the mid-1990s. However, the liabilities from these failures have trended up, implying that more large firms are going bankrupt. There has been a marked narrowing of regional differences in bankruptcy rates.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the long-run trend in business bankruptcies in Canada, examines the reaction of bankruptcies by region to the stresses associated with fluctuations in the economy and analyses the relation between the incidence of bankruptcies and the economic health of the regions. Over the past 25 years, Canadian businesses have experienced a number of tumultuous periods. After 2 decades of high bankruptcy associated with 2 major recessions and the implementation of 2 free trade agreements in the 1980s and 1990s, bankruptcies have returned by 2005 to levels experienced in the early 1980s. At the same time, the differences between the bankruptcy rates of Ontario, Quebec and British Columbia fell as the intensity of bankruptcies in these 3 provinces converged. Throughout the period, bankruptcies in these 3 provinces moved in concert with unemployment rates in most provinces. The exceptions are Alberta and Nova Scotia, which experienced marked increases in bankruptcies in the early 1990s.

    Release date: 2006-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2006042
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper investigates the extent to which productivity growth is the result of firm turnover as output is shifted from one firm to another, driven by the competitive process. Turnover occurs as some firms gain market share and others lose it. Some of the resulting turnover is due to entry and exit. Another part arises from growth and decline in incumbent continuing firms. This paper proposes a method for measuring the impact of firm turnover on productivity growth and shows that it is far more important than many previous empirical studies have concluded. It argues that firm turnover associated with competition is the main source of aggregate labour productivity growth in Canadian manufacturing industries.

    Release date: 2006-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006013
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research program aimed at outlining the importance to the firm growth process of competencies that arise from investments in intangible assets. The program has consisted of two parts. First, longitudinal databases have provided a rich set of studies on entry, exit, mergers and other aspects of dynamics related to growth and decline in firm populations. These studies have shown the pervasiveness of growth and decline in the firm population. By themselves, these studies do not demonstrate what strategies differentiate the most successful from the least successful. To do so, we have built a set of firm surveys that allowed profiles to be developed of the type of competencies that stem from investments in organizational capital. In turn, these are linked to administrative data that allow us to classify firms as either growing or declining. We then asked how differences in competencies were related to the performance of firms.

    Release date: 2006-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of trends in business sector head office employment in Canada from 1999 to 2005. It investigates changes in the number of head offices and head office employment over this period. The paper also examines the effect of foreign ownership on head office employment. It asks how much foreign-controlled firms contribute to Canadian head office employment and employment growth and what happens to head office employment when control of a firm changes from domestic to foreign. The paper also looks at the rate at which head offices enter and exit over time with a view to ascertaining whether the loss of a head office is a rare occurrence or a relatively common event. Finally, the paper presents trends in head office employment across metropolitan areas over the past six years.

    Release date: 2006-07-13
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5056
    Description: Science, Innovation and Electronic Information Division is engaged in a joint project with the National Research Council's Industrial Research Assistance Program (IRAP) to investigate the characteristics of growth firms.

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5157
    Description: The objective of the Entrepreneurship Indicators Database is to provide comprehensive business demography statistics and performance indicators for enterprises in Canada.
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