Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (15)

All (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022015
    Description:

    This infographic visually presents information on household disposal methods of textile and e-waste for the years 2017 and 2019. It also presents total household textile and e-waste diverted from landfills or incinerators and total household waste sent to landfills and incinerators for the year 2018. This infographic is based on data from the 2017 and 2019 cycles of the Households and Environment Survey and the 2018 Waste Management Industry Survey.

    Release date: 2022-02-15

  • 64C0013
    Description:

    Quarterly and annual estimates of capacity utilization for good producing industries (excluding farmers), historically back to 1971.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates trends in international trade, production and employment in the textile and clothing industries, from 1992 to 2004. It also examines patterns of trade in textiles and clothing.

    Release date: 2005-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037804
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A profile of jobs, productivity, output and trade in these industries as they enter a new trade era without import quotas.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Table: 31-001-X
    Description:

    This publication provides estimated values of manufacturers' shipments, inventories and orders by month. Data are presented for 21 major groups and selected individual industries at the 3- to 6-digit level of detail, as defined by the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), as well as aggregates for durable, non-durable and total manufacturing. Major group industry data are shown with and without adjustment for seasonal variation. Unadjusted shipment totals by province and by major groups within provinces are also shown.

    These data are used to monitor the business cycle in the manufacturing sector of the economy, to evaluate and develop financial and industrial policy, and to provide market data at the detailed industry level. Related information on manufacturers' opinions on the current state of inventories and orders and about employment and production prospects over the next three months are available from the Business Conditions Survey (BCS).

    The survey is carried out at the beginning of January, April, July and October. Responses are available approximately five days after the reference month in Statistics Canada's The Daily. The BCS balance of opinion data often serves as a good guide to the direction of change, at least a month in advance of the corresponding quantitative data.

    Release date: 2005-02-15

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-204-X
    Description:

    Productivity growth in Canada (PGC), is the reference publication on productivity in Canada. The objective of this publication is twofold: a) to illustrate the importance of productivity trends on the changes in living standards in Canada and, b) to measure the productivity performance of the Canadian economy in comparison with the United States, in particular. PGC includes articles on productivity and related issues and serves as a vehicle to understanding the sources underlying economic growth in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005492
    Description:

    This chapter explores whether the Canadian economy is restructuring toward higher productivity industries, and whether, at the industry level, productivity growth is passed on to consumers in the form of lower prices or to workers in the form of higher wages.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005494
    Description:

    This chapter examines long-run productivity growth trends in the Canadian and U.S. business and manufacturing sectors, and short-run growth in labour productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Performance of the textile products industries. by Yasmin Sheikh. The business climate under which the manufacturing sector has been operating has evolved particularly in the last decade. Within manufacturing, certain industries have responded better than others to the challenge brought about by advancement in technology and increased globalization. Textile products was the fastest growing industry in terms of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 1961 to 1987 compared to the overall economy, the manufacturing sector and closely related Primary Textile Industries. However, this industry's GDP declined sharply between 1988 and 1992. Except for 1996, the industry again experienced growth from 1993 onwards but its GDP growth index is well below its peak in 1987.

    Results of the Annual Survey of Manufacturers show that manufacturing shipments of textile products in constant 1992 dollars peaked in 1988 and have since declined. This paper reviews data from this survey for the period 1988 to 1997 to underline the changes in the size, structure and performance of this industry and how it has fared in comparison to the Primary Textiles Industry. It also highlights current developments using results of the Monthly Survey of Manufacturers.

    Release date: 2000-04-06
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 31-001-X
    Description:

    This publication provides estimated values of manufacturers' shipments, inventories and orders by month. Data are presented for 21 major groups and selected individual industries at the 3- to 6-digit level of detail, as defined by the 1997 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS), as well as aggregates for durable, non-durable and total manufacturing. Major group industry data are shown with and without adjustment for seasonal variation. Unadjusted shipment totals by province and by major groups within provinces are also shown.

    These data are used to monitor the business cycle in the manufacturing sector of the economy, to evaluate and develop financial and industrial policy, and to provide market data at the detailed industry level. Related information on manufacturers' opinions on the current state of inventories and orders and about employment and production prospects over the next three months are available from the Business Conditions Survey (BCS).

    The survey is carried out at the beginning of January, April, July and October. Responses are available approximately five days after the reference month in Statistics Canada's The Daily. The BCS balance of opinion data often serves as a good guide to the direction of change, at least a month in advance of the corresponding quantitative data.

    Release date: 2005-02-15

  • Table: 31-212-X
    Description:

    This publication shows expenditures, by industry, for the various types of packaging materials.

    Release date: 2000-03-03

  • Table: 62-010-X
    Description:

    The publication highlights current and historical statistics on consumer prices and related price indexes. A comparative index contains retail price differentials for 11 major cities by selected groups of consumer goods and services.

    Release date: 1999-08-03
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022015
    Description:

    This infographic visually presents information on household disposal methods of textile and e-waste for the years 2017 and 2019. It also presents total household textile and e-waste diverted from landfills or incinerators and total household waste sent to landfills and incinerators for the year 2018. This infographic is based on data from the 2017 and 2019 cycles of the Households and Environment Survey and the 2018 Waste Management Industry Survey.

    Release date: 2022-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005022
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article investigates trends in international trade, production and employment in the textile and clothing industries, from 1992 to 2004. It also examines patterns of trade in textiles and clothing.

    Release date: 2005-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050037804
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A profile of jobs, productivity, output and trade in these industries as they enter a new trade era without import quotas.

    Release date: 2005-03-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 15-204-X
    Description:

    Productivity growth in Canada (PGC), is the reference publication on productivity in Canada. The objective of this publication is twofold: a) to illustrate the importance of productivity trends on the changes in living standards in Canada and, b) to measure the productivity performance of the Canadian economy in comparison with the United States, in particular. PGC includes articles on productivity and related issues and serves as a vehicle to understanding the sources underlying economic growth in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005492
    Description:

    This chapter explores whether the Canadian economy is restructuring toward higher productivity industries, and whether, at the industry level, productivity growth is passed on to consumers in the form of lower prices or to workers in the form of higher wages.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005494
    Description:

    This chapter examines long-run productivity growth trends in the Canadian and U.S. business and manufacturing sectors, and short-run growth in labour productivity.

    Release date: 2001-02-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 34-251-X
    Description:

    The latest issue contains the article "Performance of the textile products industries. by Yasmin Sheikh. The business climate under which the manufacturing sector has been operating has evolved particularly in the last decade. Within manufacturing, certain industries have responded better than others to the challenge brought about by advancement in technology and increased globalization. Textile products was the fastest growing industry in terms of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) from 1961 to 1987 compared to the overall economy, the manufacturing sector and closely related Primary Textile Industries. However, this industry's GDP declined sharply between 1988 and 1992. Except for 1996, the industry again experienced growth from 1993 onwards but its GDP growth index is well below its peak in 1987.

    Results of the Annual Survey of Manufacturers show that manufacturing shipments of textile products in constant 1992 dollars peaked in 1988 and have since declined. This paper reviews data from this survey for the period 1988 to 1997 to underline the changes in the size, structure and performance of this industry and how it has fared in comparison to the Primary Textiles Industry. It also highlights current developments using results of the Monthly Survey of Manufacturers.

    Release date: 2000-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990044757
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The recent increase in exports' share of GDP has been exceptional. Imports have mirrored the trend in exports, with trade across the U.S. border being the driving force for both. Using Statistics Canada's Input-Output tables, this article explores the issue of some goods moving back and forth across the border at various stages of processing. (Adapted from an article in Canadian Economic Observer published in November 1999).

    Release date: 1999-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1998012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the methods of adjustment for quality change made in the Canadian Consumer Price Index for the period 1989 to 1994. It finds that in most cases the current Canadian practice ensures that the replacement of one commodity by another, one variety of a commodity by another, or one outlet by another, has no impact on the overall index. The main exceptions to this result occur when replacing varieties of commodities that are purchased only occasionally, and a judgement is made that the quality ratio between the old and new variety is not the same as the ratio of their prices. In these cases there is an impact on the index, up or down, depending on whether the change in price reported is higher or lower than the change in quality. From the experience of the CPI in these six years there has been a correlation between the price ratio of a variety and its replacement and the index movement that derives from the judgement. The direction and size of the impact on the index depends largely on whether an item is replaced with a higher or lower priced item. For these reasons, the paper argues that more attention should be paid to ensuring that the item selection is more representative of current sales than has traditionally been the case.

    Release date: 1999-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1998119
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines differences in technology use in Canada as opposed to the United States as well as reasons for these differences. It examines different aspects of technology use-numbers of technologies used, types of technologies used, as well as regional, size and industry variations in their use. It then investigates differences in benefits that plant managers perceive stem from advanced technology use and differences in the factors that managers assess as impediments. While managers in both countries generally place quite similar emphases on items in the list of benefits received and problems that have impeded adoption, there are significant differences that arise because of the smaller size of the Canadian market.

    Release date: 1999-04-07
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002002
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via paper questionnaires and personal interviews conducted in January, February and March after the reference year. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the 10 provinces and the 3 territories. (The territories are surveyed every second year, starting in 2001.) This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2002-12-11
Date modified: