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  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300211871
    Description:

    Regression models are routinely used in the analysis of survey data, where one common issue of interest is to identify influential factors that are associated with certain behavioral, social, or economic indices within a target population. When data are collected through complex surveys, the properties of classical variable selection approaches developed in i.i.d. non-survey settings need to be re-examined. In this paper, we derive a pseudo-likelihood-based BIC criterion for variable selection in the analysis of survey data and suggest a sample-based penalized likelihood approach for its implementation. The sampling weights are appropriately assigned to correct the biased selection result caused by the distortion between the sample and the target population. Under a joint randomization framework, we establish the consistency of the proposed selection procedure. The finite-sample performance of the approach is assessed through analysis and computer simulations based on data from the hypertension component of the 2009 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010950
    Description:

    The next census will be conducted in May 2011. Being a major survey, it presents a formidable challenge for Statistics Canada and requires a great deal of time and resources. Careful planning has been done to ensure that all deadlines are met. A number of steps have been planned in the questionnaire testing process. These tests apply to both census content and the proposed communications strategy. This paper presents an overview of the strategy, with a focus on combining qualitative studies with the 2008 quantitative study so that the results can be analyzed and the proposals properly evaluated.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010994
    Description:

    The growing difficulty of reaching respondents has a general impact on non-response in telephone surveys, especially those that use random digit dialling (RDD), such as the General Social Survey (GSS). The GSS is an annual multipurpose survey with 25,000 respondents. Its aim is to monitor the characteristics of and major changes in Canada's social structure. GSS Cycle 21 (2007) was about the family, social support and retirement. Its target population consisted of persons aged 45 and over living in the 10 Canadian provinces. For more effective coverage, part of the sample was taken from a follow-up with the respondents of GSS Cycle 20 (2006), which was on family transitions. The remainder was a new RDD sample. In this paper, we describe the survey's sampling plan and the random digit dialling method used. Then we discuss the challenges of calculating the non-response rate in an RDD survey that targets a subset of a population, for which the in-scope population must be estimated or modelled. This is done primarily through the use of paradata. The methodology used in GSS Cycle 21 is presented in detail.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 89-628-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem.

    This report presents some basic information about the survey and an overview of the methodological and content changes between the 2001 and 2006 PALS. The major difference involves a change in coverage resulting from the inclusion of a number of aboriginal communities, the addition of the three territories, and the modification to the definition of collective dwellings.

    Release date: 2007-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006282
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment rates and earnings among single mothers improved significantly after 1980, and by 2000, low-income rates reached new historic lows. Unlike married mothers, most of the gains among lone mothers were the result of the dynamics of population change and cohort replacement as the large and better educated baby boom generation replaced earlier cohorts and began entering their forties. Most of these gains, moreover, went to older lone mothers. The demographically driven gains of lone mothers in the past quarter century were an historical event unlikely to be repeated in the future. Since the demographic drivers underlying these gains are now nearing maturity, future gains from this source are likely to be modest.

    Release date: 2006-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005262
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper reviews the increase in the earnings gap between immigrants and Canadian-born over the past two decades, and the current explanations of this labour market deterioration among recent immigrants in particular. The paper also outlines the rising gap in low-income rates between immigrants and non-immigrants. Like previous research, the paper concludes that the earnings gap at entry has increased for immigrants entering Canada during the 1990s, as compared to those of the 1970s. Furthermore, the gap in the low-income rate has been increasing. The rate of low income has been rising among immigrants (particularly recent immigrants) during the 1990s, while falling among the Canadian-born. The rise in low-income rates among immigrants was widespread, affecting immigrants in all education groups, age groups, and from most source countries (except the "traditional source regions"). Immigrants with university degrees were not excluded from this rise in low-income rates, in spite of the discussion regarding the rising demand for more highly-skilled workers in Canada. As a result of both rising low-income rates among immigrants, and their increasing share of the population, in Canada's major cities virtually all of the increase in the city low-income rates during the 1990s was concentrated among the immigrant population.

    Also reviewed here are the explanations discussed in the literature for the deterioration of immigrant economic outcomes. Three major sources are identified as being empirically important, all of which follow from declining labour market outcomes. First, the change in the characteristics of immigrants (e.g., from different source regions, rising levels of educational attainment, etc.) appears to have accounted for about one-third of the increase in the earnings gap at entry (i.e., the gap between immigrants and comparable Canadian-born). Second, decreasing economic returns to foreign work experience appears to play an equally large role. Third, there has been a general decline in the labour market outcomes of all new entrants to the Canadian labour market, and when new immigrants arrive in Canada they, regardless of age, appear to face a similar phenomenon. Other possible explanations are also discussed. Importantly, one potential factor that does not appear to be behind the decline is a reduction in the economic return to education. Immigrants, on average, do have a somewhat lower return to education obtained prior to immigrating (although not to education obtained once in Canada), but this has not changed much over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2005-06-27

  • Table: 97F0012X2001007
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Canada's Workforce: Paid Work, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0012XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001007.

    Release date: 2004-04-21

  • Table: 97F0011X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2003-12-10
Data (42)

Data (42) (0 to 10 of 42 results)

  • Table: 97F0012X2001007
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Canada's Workforce: Paid Work," which presents 2001 Census data on the paid work of the Canadian workforce, including detailed industry and occupation data, class of worker and work activity during the reference year. Labour market information is available for small areas and small population groups.

    These data are used by governments, businesses, labour unions and others to analyze labour market conditions throughout the country. For small areas, the census is useful in allowing for comparisons of labour market structure and performance between areas. Similarly, for small population groups, such as visible minorities, immigrants and language groups, the census allows the assessment of the occupational structure and labour market status and integration of these groups compared with the population as a whole. The census is also the only source of data covering the entire labour market, including Indian reserves, overseas households, and all provinces and territories. Given the size of the census sample, this level of industry and occupation detail is reliable at very detailed levels of geography.

    This table can be found in Topic Bundle: Canada's Workforce: Paid Work, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F0012XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0012XIE2001007.

    Release date: 2004-04-21

  • Table: 97F0011X2001040
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001040.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001046
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001046.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001047
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001047.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001048
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001048.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001054
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic 'Aboriginal Peoples of Canada,' which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001054.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Table: 97F0011X2001055
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001055.

    Release date: 2003-12-10

  • Profile of a community or region: 94F0046X
    Description:

    This profile provides a statistical overview at the provincial and territorial geographic level, presenting most of the census variables. It contains fewer details about the breakdown of variables than the electronic cumulative profiles and the print profiles.

    The profiles are part of the census standard data products, which are data tables extracted from the 2001 Census database. They contain statistical information about all population, household, dwelling and family characteristics.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Table: 97F0011X2001042
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001042.

    Release date: 2003-11-19

  • Table: 97F0011X2001043
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Aboriginal Peoples of Canada," which shows 2001 Census data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. Depending on the application, counts using any of the following concepts may be appropriate for defining the Aboriginal population: (1) Aboriginal identity, (2) Aboriginal origin, (3) Registered Indian status and (4) First Nation or Band membership. Data from the 2001 Census will be available for the geographical locations where these populations reside, including areas with urban/rural and Indian reserve designations. Data pertaining to the socio-economic characteristics of these populations is also available.

    Additional information on the Aboriginal population is also available from the Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. For more information, please refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0011XIE2001043.

    Release date: 2003-11-19
Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (0 to 10 of 36 results)

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201300211871
    Description:

    Regression models are routinely used in the analysis of survey data, where one common issue of interest is to identify influential factors that are associated with certain behavioral, social, or economic indices within a target population. When data are collected through complex surveys, the properties of classical variable selection approaches developed in i.i.d. non-survey settings need to be re-examined. In this paper, we derive a pseudo-likelihood-based BIC criterion for variable selection in the analysis of survey data and suggest a sample-based penalized likelihood approach for its implementation. The sampling weights are appropriately assigned to correct the biased selection result caused by the distortion between the sample and the target population. Under a joint randomization framework, we establish the consistency of the proposed selection procedure. The finite-sample performance of the approach is assessed through analysis and computer simulations based on data from the hypertension component of the 2009 Survey on Living with Chronic Diseases in Canada.

    Release date: 2014-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010950
    Description:

    The next census will be conducted in May 2011. Being a major survey, it presents a formidable challenge for Statistics Canada and requires a great deal of time and resources. Careful planning has been done to ensure that all deadlines are met. A number of steps have been planned in the questionnaire testing process. These tests apply to both census content and the proposed communications strategy. This paper presents an overview of the strategy, with a focus on combining qualitative studies with the 2008 quantitative study so that the results can be analyzed and the proposals properly evaluated.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010994
    Description:

    The growing difficulty of reaching respondents has a general impact on non-response in telephone surveys, especially those that use random digit dialling (RDD), such as the General Social Survey (GSS). The GSS is an annual multipurpose survey with 25,000 respondents. Its aim is to monitor the characteristics of and major changes in Canada's social structure. GSS Cycle 21 (2007) was about the family, social support and retirement. Its target population consisted of persons aged 45 and over living in the 10 Canadian provinces. For more effective coverage, part of the sample was taken from a follow-up with the respondents of GSS Cycle 20 (2006), which was on family transitions. The remainder was a new RDD sample. In this paper, we describe the survey's sampling plan and the random digit dialling method used. Then we discuss the challenges of calculating the non-response rate in an RDD survey that targets a subset of a population, for which the in-scope population must be estimated or modelled. This is done primarily through the use of paradata. The methodology used in GSS Cycle 21 is presented in detail.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Stats in brief: 89-628-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is Canada's national survey that gathers information about adults and children whose daily activities are limited by a physical, mental, or other health-related condition or problem.

    This report presents some basic information about the survey and an overview of the methodological and content changes between the 2001 and 2006 PALS. The major difference involves a change in coverage resulting from the inclusion of a number of aboriginal communities, the addition of the three territories, and the modification to the definition of collective dwellings.

    Release date: 2007-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006282
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment rates and earnings among single mothers improved significantly after 1980, and by 2000, low-income rates reached new historic lows. Unlike married mothers, most of the gains among lone mothers were the result of the dynamics of population change and cohort replacement as the large and better educated baby boom generation replaced earlier cohorts and began entering their forties. Most of these gains, moreover, went to older lone mothers. The demographically driven gains of lone mothers in the past quarter century were an historical event unlikely to be repeated in the future. Since the demographic drivers underlying these gains are now nearing maturity, future gains from this source are likely to be modest.

    Release date: 2006-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005262
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper reviews the increase in the earnings gap between immigrants and Canadian-born over the past two decades, and the current explanations of this labour market deterioration among recent immigrants in particular. The paper also outlines the rising gap in low-income rates between immigrants and non-immigrants. Like previous research, the paper concludes that the earnings gap at entry has increased for immigrants entering Canada during the 1990s, as compared to those of the 1970s. Furthermore, the gap in the low-income rate has been increasing. The rate of low income has been rising among immigrants (particularly recent immigrants) during the 1990s, while falling among the Canadian-born. The rise in low-income rates among immigrants was widespread, affecting immigrants in all education groups, age groups, and from most source countries (except the "traditional source regions"). Immigrants with university degrees were not excluded from this rise in low-income rates, in spite of the discussion regarding the rising demand for more highly-skilled workers in Canada. As a result of both rising low-income rates among immigrants, and their increasing share of the population, in Canada's major cities virtually all of the increase in the city low-income rates during the 1990s was concentrated among the immigrant population.

    Also reviewed here are the explanations discussed in the literature for the deterioration of immigrant economic outcomes. Three major sources are identified as being empirically important, all of which follow from declining labour market outcomes. First, the change in the characteristics of immigrants (e.g., from different source regions, rising levels of educational attainment, etc.) appears to have accounted for about one-third of the increase in the earnings gap at entry (i.e., the gap between immigrants and comparable Canadian-born). Second, decreasing economic returns to foreign work experience appears to play an equally large role. Third, there has been a general decline in the labour market outcomes of all new entrants to the Canadian labour market, and when new immigrants arrive in Canada they, regardless of age, appear to face a similar phenomenon. Other possible explanations are also discussed. Importantly, one potential factor that does not appear to be behind the decline is a reduction in the economic return to education. Immigrants, on average, do have a somewhat lower return to education obtained prior to immigrating (although not to education obtained once in Canada), but this has not changed much over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2005-06-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-589-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children who reported Aboriginal ancestry, Aboriginal identity, Registered Indian status and/or Band membership on the 2001 Census. Approximately 76,000 adults and 41,000 children living in private households in the provinces and territories were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected between September 2001 and January 2002.

    The purpose of this article is to present the initial findings from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Information on health, housing, education, residential schools and language are highlighted for Aboriginal people living off-reserve. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also information provided on children. Data showing change over time are provided as are some comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population.

    For data on the Aboriginal population residing on-reserve, please see Aboriginal Peoples Survey 2001: Internet Community Profiles (Catalogue no.89-590-XIE).

    Release date: 2003-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003203
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study addresses the effects of macroeconomic conditions on the labour market outcomes of immigrants. It simultaneously identifies both the effects of macroeconomic conditions at the time of entry into the labour market and at the time of the survey was taken, while allowing for cohort effects. Also, for the first time in the literature, the impacts on labour force participation along with employment outcomes are explored. The study uses 19 annual cross-sections of the Survey of Consumer Finances, covering the period from 1979 to 1997. The results suggest that the deterioration in the assimilation of recent immigrants is partly due to the adverse economic conditions they face in the year they enter the labour market and the subsequent years following. Macroeconomic conditions at the time of labour market entry have adverse impacts on both labour force participation (LFP) and employment. With the inclusion of controls for macroeconomic conditions, the significance and magnitude of the assimilation-measuring co-efficient increases. Therefore, not only are the estimated cohort effects sensitive to the inclusion of controls for business cycles, but so too are the assimilation profiles.

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310213084
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper looks at the availability of qualified workers as baby boomers retire, a key challenge facing employers over the first decades of the 21st century. It also examines which industries and occupations may be affected more than others.

    Release date: 2003-02-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002195
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many studies have examined the relative success of immigrant men in the (primarily paid) workforce. Despite the fact that they represent approximately one-sixth of the immigrant workforce, self-employed immigrants are a relatively understudied group. This study uses the 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1996 Census files to assess the success of self-employed immigrant men (compared with self-employed native-born men), using the relative success of paid immigrant men as the benchmark.

    After controlling for various other factors, recent immigrants (those arriving within the last five years) are as likely to be self-employed as the native-born and, over time spent in the country, are more likely to become self-employed. Recent immigrants in the 1990s were far more likely to be self-employed than the native-born. Successive cohorts of recent immigrants have fared progressively worse in the paid labour market compared with paid native-born workers. This is not the case in the self-employed workforce. Although self-employed recent immigrants typically report lower net self-employment income upon entry than the self-employed native-born, the gap has not grown. Instead, it has followed a cyclical movement: narrowing at the peak, and widening in times of weaker economic activity.

    Release date: 2002-12-09
Reference (3)

Reference (3) ((3 results))

  • Notices and consultations: 92-140-X2016001
    Description:

    The 2016 Census Program Content Test was conducted from May 2 to June 30, 2014. The Test was designed to assess the impact of any proposed content changes to the 2016 Census Program and to measure the impact of including a social insurance number (SIN) question on the data quality.

    This quantitative test used a split-panel design involving 55,000 dwellings, divided into 11 panels of 5,000 dwellings each: five panels were dedicated to the Content Test while the remaining six panels were for the SIN Test. Two models of test questionnaires were developed to meet the objectives, namely a model with all the proposed changes EXCEPT the SIN question and a model with all the proposed changes INCLUDING the SIN question. A third model of 'control' questionnaire with the 2011 content was also developed. The population living in a private dwelling in mail-out areas in one of the ten provinces was targeted for the test. Paper and electronic response channels were part of the Test as well.

    This report presents the Test objectives, the design and a summary of the analysis in order to determine potential content for the 2016 Census Program. Results from the data analysis of the Test were not the only elements used to determine the content for 2016. Other elements were also considered, such as response burden, comparison over time and users’ needs.

    Release date: 2016-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-591-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this document is to provide users with a discussion of the concepts and definitions used in the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, which was conducted in the fall of 2001 through to the spring of 2002. Technical details on sampling, processing, data quality, etc. are also included. The guide explains the relationship between the Aboriginal Peoples Survey and the 2001 Census and cautions users as to important differences in the data produced from the two sources. A list of products is also included.

    Release date: 2003-09-24

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X19990015670
    Description:

    To reach their target audience efficiently, advertisers and media planners need information on which media their customers use. For instance, they may need to know what percentage of Diet Coke drinkers watch Baywatch, or how many AT&T customers have seen an advertisement for Sprint during the last week. All the relevant data could theoretically be collected from each respondent. However, obtaining full detailed and accurate information would be very expensive. It would also impose a heavy respondent burden under current data collection technology. This information is currently collected through separate surveys in New Zealand and in many other countries. Exposure to the major media is measured continuously, and product usage studies are common. Statistical matching techniques provide a way of combining these separate information sources. The New Zealand television ratings database was combined with a syndicated survey of print readership and product usage, using statistical matching. The resulting Panorama service meets the targeting information needs of advertisers and media planners. It has since been duplicated in Australia. This paper discusses the development of the statistical matching framework for combining these databases, and the heuristics and techniques used. These included an experiment conducted using a screening design to identify important matching variables. Studies evaluating and validating the combined results are also summarized. The following three major evaluation criteria were used; accuracy of combined results, statibility of combined results and the preservation of currency results from the component databases. The paper then discusses how the prerequisites for combining the databases were met. The biggest hurdle at this stage was the differences between the analysis techniques used on the two component databases. Finally, suggestions for developing similar statistical matching systems elsewhere will be given.

    Release date: 2000-03-02
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