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All (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019012
    Description:

    It has been well-documented that postsecondary graduates, on average, earn considerably more than others. Consequently, increasing postsecondary enrollment among youth from lower-income families—through targeted student aid or community outreach programs—may constitute an effective mechanism for promoting upward income mobility. However, there currently exists no evidence of the benefits of a postsecondary education (PSE) for youth from lower-income families per se. Using postsecondary administrative records and income tax records, this study bridges this information gap by estimating the association between earnings and PSE by level of parental income among a cohort of Ontario postsecondary graduates and a comparison group of Ontario youth who did not enroll in a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2019-04-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019010
    Description:

    While several studies have documented the evolution of the earnings of immigrants in Canada over the last three decades, the evolution of immigrants’ wealth has received relatively little attention. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security of 1999, 2005, 2012 and 2016, this study fills this gap. The study uncovers several key patterns.

    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100005
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), this article looks at changes in debt, assets and net worth among senior Canadian families over the period from 1999 to 2016. It also examines changes in the debt-to-income ratio and the debt-to-asset ratio of Canadian senior families with debt.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019003
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines data on the financial conditions of Canadian households, focusing on recent trends related to indebtedness, income growth, and net worth. Aggregate leverage indicators are examined for the household sector as a whole, followed by a more detailed analysis of households with different income profiles in selected urban areas. This study highlights the extent to which indebtedness and household wealth differ across the country, along with the financial vulnerabilities facing low income households.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Public use microdata: 13M0006X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Financial Security is a collection of income, assets, debts and wealth data on the economy of Canadian families. The production of this file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person or family.

    The file is produced at the economic family level with information on family demographics; income; financial behaviours and attitudes; principal residence; assets, debts and net worth; family composition and size; and the major income recipient.

    Please see the user guide for more information.  

    Release date: 2018-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017083
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2017-03-15
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Public use microdata: 13M0006X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Financial Security is a collection of income, assets, debts and wealth data on the economy of Canadian families. The production of this file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person or family.

    The file is produced at the economic family level with information on family demographics; income; financial behaviours and attitudes; principal residence; assets, debts and net worth; family composition and size; and the major income recipient.

    Please see the user guide for more information.  

    Release date: 2018-06-26

  • Table: 13-022-X
    Description:

    These data tables provide national and sectoral wealth and net worth in the form of quarterly balance sheets for the total economy and its component sectors. Sector aggregations and tangible and financial asset and liability categories are reconcilable to quarterly financial flow account transactions. The tables include data beginning in 1990, and is no longer being released.

    Release date: 2012-06-15

  • Table: 56-203-X
    Description:

    This online publication presents annual, detailed financial statistics on the Canadian telephone industry by province. Also included are operational data such as wire mileage, number of telephone calls and number of access lines in service. There is a textual analysis of the data with comments on methodology, a data quality and a glossary of terms.

    Release date: 2001-04-17
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019012
    Description:

    It has been well-documented that postsecondary graduates, on average, earn considerably more than others. Consequently, increasing postsecondary enrollment among youth from lower-income families—through targeted student aid or community outreach programs—may constitute an effective mechanism for promoting upward income mobility. However, there currently exists no evidence of the benefits of a postsecondary education (PSE) for youth from lower-income families per se. Using postsecondary administrative records and income tax records, this study bridges this information gap by estimating the association between earnings and PSE by level of parental income among a cohort of Ontario postsecondary graduates and a comparison group of Ontario youth who did not enroll in a postsecondary institution.

    Release date: 2019-04-26

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019029
    Description:

    This infographic examines economic wellbeing for millennials (those between 25 and 34 years old in 2016) and provides a comparison with generation X at the same age (those between 25 and 34 years old in 1999). Information is provided on income, assets, debts and net worth.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Stats in brief: 89-20-00042019002
    Description:

    A recent study compares financial outcomes for millennials and generation X when they were younger. A short video provides a quick overview of key points, examining how millennials are doing in terms of wealth and debt levels. It also highlights disparities in wealth among their generation.

    Release date: 2019-04-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019010
    Description:

    While several studies have documented the evolution of the earnings of immigrants in Canada over the last three decades, the evolution of immigrants’ wealth has received relatively little attention. Using data from the Survey of Financial Security of 1999, 2005, 2012 and 2016, this study fills this gap. The study uncovers several key patterns.

    Release date: 2019-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100005
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), this article looks at changes in debt, assets and net worth among senior Canadian families over the period from 1999 to 2016. It also examines changes in the debt-to-income ratio and the debt-to-asset ratio of Canadian senior families with debt.

    Release date: 2019-04-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019003
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines data on the financial conditions of Canadian households, focusing on recent trends related to indebtedness, income growth, and net worth. Aggregate leverage indicators are examined for the household sector as a whole, followed by a more detailed analysis of households with different income profiles in selected urban areas. This study highlights the extent to which indebtedness and household wealth differ across the country, along with the financial vulnerabilities facing low income households.

    Release date: 2019-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017071
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article documents the characteristics of families with children under the age of 18 who hold registered education savings plan (RESP) investments. The article also examines the relationship between holding an RESP account at age 15 and postsecondary enrolment between the ages of 19 and 27. The data are drawn from the 1999 and 2012 Survey of Financial Security and from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A, linked to the T1 Family File. Postsecondary enrolment is derived from education deductions and tuition credits in the tax data.

    Release date: 2017-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017083
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2017-03-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114194
    Description:

    This article examines changes in the wealth of Canadian families over the period 1999 to 2012, with a particular focus on changes across income quintiles. The paper also examines changes in the concentration of wealth across income quintiles, as well as the characteristics of families with low income and no wealth.

    Release date: 2015-06-03
Reference (12)

Reference (12) (0 to 10 of 12 results)

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201500314153
    Description:

    The Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA) is a source of invaluable information for business, governments and citizens. These accounts provide users with important insights into the inner-workings of the economy, current economic trends and interactions between the various sectors of the economy. In order for these accounts to remain relevant, the underlying concepts, methods, classification systems and data sources need to be periodically updated.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-605-X201400111911
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are carried out regularly in the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods.

    Release date: 2014-02-28

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201400111912
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are regularly applied to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods. Statistics Canada also conducts more comprehensive revisions to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts, which generally reflect new concepts, accounting treatments or methods.

    Release date: 2014-02-28

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201300311816
    Description:

    Statistical revisions are regularly applied to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts in order to incorporate the most current information from censuses, annual surveys, administrative statistics, public accounts, etc., and to implement improved estimation methods. Statistics Canada also conducts more comprehensive revisions to the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts, which generally reflect new concepts, accounting treatments or methods. This paper outlines the scheduled revisions planned for 2013 to 2015.

    Release date: 2013-05-21

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201200111671
    Description:

    Macroeconomic data for Canada, including Canada's National Accounts (gross domestic product (GDP), saving and net worth), Balance of International Payments (current and capital account surplus or deficit and International Investment Position) and Government Financial Statistics (government deficit and debt) are based on international standards. These international standards are set on a coordinated basis by international organizations including the United Nations, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and Eurostat, with input from experts around the world. Canada has always played an important role in the development and updating of these standards as they have transformed from the crude guidelines of the early to mid 20th century to the fully articulated standards that exist today.

    The purpose of this document is to introduce a new presentation of the quarterly National Accounts (Income and Expenditure Accounts, Financial Flow Accounts and National Balance Sheet Accounts) that will be published with the conversion of the Canadian National Accounts to the latest international standard - System of National Accounts 2008.

    Release date: 2012-05-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X201000111130
    Description:

    The majority of Canada's national, provincial and territorial macroeconomic indicators originate from the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA). These indicators include such things as gross domestic product, net worth, savings, personal disposable income and government debt. Statistics Canada is launching a project that will make key changes to these macroeconomic indicators. The changes introduced by this project are outlined in this paper.

    Release date: 2010-05-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2007001
    Description:

    This guide will be of assistance when using the public use microdata file (PUMF) of the Survey of Financial Security (SFS) conducted by the Pensions and Wealth Surveys Section of the Income Statistics Division.

    Release date: 2007-09-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001003
    Description:

    Initial results from the Survey of Financial Security (SFS), which provides information on the net worth of Canadians, were released on March 15 2001, in The daily. The survey collected information on the value of the financial and non-financial assets owned by each family unit and on the amount of their debt.

    Statistics Canada is currently refining this initial estimate of net worth by adding to it an estimate of the value of benefits accrued in employer pension plans. This is an important addition to any asset and debt survey as, for many family units, it is likely to be one of the largest assets. With the aging of the population, information on pension accumulations is greatly needed to better understand the financial situation of those nearing retirement. These updated estimates of the Survey of Financial Security will be released in late fall 2001.

    The process for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits is a complex one. This document describes the methodology for estimating that value, for the following groups: a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    This methodology was proposed by Hubert Frenken and Michael Cohen. The former has many years of experience with Statistics Canada working with data on employer pension plans; the latter is a principal with the actuarial consulting firm William M. Mercer. Earlier this year, Statistics Canada carried out a public consultation on the proposed methodology. This report includes updates made as a result of feedback received from data users.

    Release date: 2001-09-05

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M2001002
    Description:

    The Survey of Financial Security (SFS) will provide information on the net worth of Canadians. In order to do this, information was collected - in May and June 1999 - on the value of the assets and debts of each of the families or unattached individuals in the sample. The value of one particular asset is not easy to determine, or to estimate. That is the present value of the amount people have accrued in their employer pension plan. These plans are often called registered pension plans (RPP), as they must be registered with Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Although some RPP members receive estimates of the value of their accrued benefit, in most cases plan members would not know this amount. However, it is likely to be one of the largest assets for many family units. And, as the baby boomers approach retirement, information on their pension accumulations is much needed to better understand their financial readiness for this transition.

    The intent of this paper is to: present, for discussion, a methodology for estimating the present value of employer pension plan benefits for the Survey of Financial Security; and to seek feedback on the proposed methodology. This document proposes a methodology for estimating the value of employer pension plan benefits for the following groups:a) persons who belonged to an RPP at the time of the survey (referred to as current plan members); b) persons who had previously belonged to an RPP and either left the money in the plan or transferred it to a new plan; c) persons who are receiving RPP benefits.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13F0026M1999006
    Description:

    Although income and expenditure data provide an indication of current consumption and ability to purchase goods and services, they provide little information on the long-term ability of families to sustain themselves. The results of this survey will provide information on the net worth (wealth) of Canadian families, that is, the value of their assets less their debts.

    This paper examines the objectives of the survey, how the survey has changed since 1984, the types of questions being asked and information that will be provided, as well as other survey background. An accompanying table outlines the content of the questionnaire. The intent of this paper is to describe the work done to date and the next steps for this important subject.

    Release date: 1999-09-27
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