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  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017069
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the extent to which immigrant-owned businesses are in the ‘knowledge-based’ economy, in the more traditional ethnic economy, or in other industrial sectors. It further outlines the differences among immigrant classes (family, refugee, business and economic classes) in the types of businesses owned. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: privately-owned incorporated companies and the unincorporated self-employed.

    Release date: 2017-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the late 1990s, studies showed that a growing number of the most qualified Canadian workers were leaving Canada to work in the United States. This article looks at whether this trend has continued in recent years. Using a relatively new data source, the American Community Survey (ACS), this article examines Canadian emigration to the United States. More specifically, it examines demographic and socio-economic characteristics of those who migrate to the United States.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611126
    Description:

    Lifelong learning is increasingly recognized as an important element in today's knowledge-based economy defined by rapid advancements in technology and constantly changing skill needs. Lifelong learning is supported by both formal education and training. Information on the participation of Canadian adults in education and training activities is provided by the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) 2003 and the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) 2008. This article highlights some of the key findings of a recent Statistics Canada report that examined trends in adult education and training, based on data from these two surveys.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: 1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), which focused on 0 to 18 year olds; 2) the Post-Secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS), which focused on 18 to 24 year olds; and 3) the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), which focused on 25 to 65 year olds. While these three surveys examined specific facets of Canadian's educational experience, their integration in the ASETS allows for a more holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada. While the ASETS can be used to undertake the same research as the PEPS, AETS and SAEP, it can also be used to address additional research not previously possible.

    The ASETS results presented in this report refer to activities undertaken between July 2007 and June 2008 reference period.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-511-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This book is designed to contribute to the foundation of basic information that leaders and researchers will need when they begin to devote much more time and resources to the institutional adjustments that the up-coming wave of retirements among baby boomers will require. Its contents deal with aspects of retirement that have been outside the main focus in the research literature, but which will likely receive much greater attention in the future. These aspects include social issues arising from the emergence of a large number of people who form a substantial proportion of the adult population and whose length of time in retirement will be as long as that of a generation, roughly 25 years; women's retirement; family dynamics and retirement; and retirement processes among people with no career job as conventionally defined. A large part of the book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data series that serve to illustrate the potentials of our data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 71-585-X
    Description:

    This compendium provides data from the new Workplace and Employee Survey (WES) conducted by Statistics Canada with the support of Human Resources Development Canada. The survey consists of two components: (1) a workplace survey on the adoption of technologies, organizational change, training and other human resource practices, business strategies, and labour turnover in workplaces; and (2) a survey of employees within these same workplaces covering wages, hours of work, job type, human capital, use of technologies and training. The result is a rich new source of linked information on workplaces and their employees.

    Release date: 2008-09-24
Analysis (63)

Analysis (63) (0 to 10 of 63 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017069
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series describes the extent to which immigrant-owned businesses are in the ‘knowledge-based’ economy, in the more traditional ethnic economy, or in other industrial sectors. It further outlines the differences among immigrant classes (family, refugee, business and economic classes) in the types of businesses owned. The analysis focuses on two types of businesses: privately-owned incorporated companies and the unincorporated self-employed.

    Release date: 2017-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014361
    Description:

    In Canada, the selection of economic immigrants throughout the 1990s and 2000s was based largely on the human capital model of immigration. This model posits that selecting immigrants with high levels of human capital is particularly advantageous in the long run. It is argued that higher educational levels allow immigrants to both bring the skills needed in a "knowledge-based economy" and, perhaps more importantly, better adjust to both cyclical and structural changes in the labour market than immigrants with lower educational levels.

    This paper examines the trends in the earnings advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over less educated immigrants by immigration class. The focus is on three questions. First, did the well-documented decline in entry earnings observed over the last quarter-century vary by immigrant educational level and by admission class? Second, have there been significant shifts across recent cohorts in the economic advantage that more highly educated immigrants hold over their less educated counterparts, both at entry and in the longer run? Third, and most importantly, does the relative earnings advantage of more highly educated immigrants change with time spent in Canada, that is, in the longer run?

    Release date: 2014-05-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the late 1990s, studies showed that a growing number of the most qualified Canadian workers were leaving Canada to work in the United States. This article looks at whether this trend has continued in recent years. Using a relatively new data source, the American Community Survey (ACS), this article examines Canadian emigration to the United States. More specifically, it examines demographic and socio-economic characteristics of those who migrate to the United States.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900611126
    Description:

    Lifelong learning is increasingly recognized as an important element in today's knowledge-based economy defined by rapid advancements in technology and constantly changing skill needs. Lifelong learning is supported by both formal education and training. Information on the participation of Canadian adults in education and training activities is provided by the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS) 2003 and the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS) 2008. This article highlights some of the key findings of a recent Statistics Canada report that examined trends in adult education and training, based on data from these two surveys.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009079
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report is based on the Access and Support to Education and Training Survey (ASETS), which was undertaken by Statistics Canada in partnership with Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The ASETS brings together three previous education surveys that covered specific population groups: 1) the Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP), which focused on 0 to 18 year olds; 2) the Post-Secondary Education Participation Survey (PEPS), which focused on 18 to 24 year olds; and 3) the Adult Education and Training Survey (AETS), which focused on 25 to 65 year olds. While these three surveys examined specific facets of Canadian's educational experience, their integration in the ASETS allows for a more holistic approach to collecting information on participation in and financing of education and training in Canada. While the ASETS can be used to undertake the same research as the PEPS, AETS and SAEP, it can also be used to address additional research not previously possible.

    The ASETS results presented in this report refer to activities undertaken between July 2007 and June 2008 reference period.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The bulletin summarizes and highlights new results in the analysis of science, technology and the information society. The articles cover current issues in science and technology activities, advanced technologies, innovation in industry and electronic media. The bulletin is designed to be easily readable by non-experts.

    Release date: 2009-06-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 75-511-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This book is designed to contribute to the foundation of basic information that leaders and researchers will need when they begin to devote much more time and resources to the institutional adjustments that the up-coming wave of retirements among baby boomers will require. Its contents deal with aspects of retirement that have been outside the main focus in the research literature, but which will likely receive much greater attention in the future. These aspects include social issues arising from the emergence of a large number of people who form a substantial proportion of the adult population and whose length of time in retirement will be as long as that of a generation, roughly 25 years; women's retirement; family dynamics and retirement; and retirement processes among people with no career job as conventionally defined. A large part of the book is devoted to scientific papers that are based upon Statistics Canada's data and which require substantial innovations of useful concepts and data series that serve to illustrate the potentials of our data.

    Release date: 2008-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800210644
    Description:

    This article provides information on employer-sponsored training in Canada. It examines the reasons for participating in adult education and training, the labour force status of participants, the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning and the relationship between skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning. The findings summarized here are based on analysis of data from the 1994 International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS), undertaken in 1994, and the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), undertaken in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Adult Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)). The analysis is provided from an international perspective, with the situation in Canada being compared to that of three other countries - Norway, Switzerland and the United States.

    Release date: 2008-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800110560
    Description:

    Research has shown that in a knowledge-based economy and society, economic opportunities and active participation in the broader society are increasingly linked to an individual's ability to command and control his or her own life. It is this context that makes the distribution of adult learning across the population of such importance.

    Canada has had a long interest in better understanding the distribution of adult literacy and learning across population sub-groups. Canada participated in the first round of data collection in the International Adult Literacy Survey (ALL) in 1994. Canada was also a lead country in the international Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL) in 2003 ((the Canadian component is called the International Literacy and Skills Survey (IALSS)).

    The data collected by these surveys provide a wealth of information on the characteristics of adult learners and have generated a number of research studies. This article presents some of the key findings of a recent report that provides detailed information on the characteristics of adult learners in Canada, including the links between participation in adult education and training and literacy skill levels, education, family background and age.

    Release date: 2008-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 81-590-X2007001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test. This report provides results from the PISA 2006 assessment of student performance in science, reading and mathematics at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2006 has a special focus on science. Over fifty countries participated in PISA 2006, including all 30 OECD countries. About 22,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-03-14
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-622-M2003001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report focusses on new studies that analyse information and communications technology industries, science-based industries, high-technology industries and firms, the knowledge-based economy, and knowledge workers.

    Release date: 2003-05-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11
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