Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (18)

All (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Table: 61-220-X
    Description:

    Each year, Statistics Canada produces a report on foreign control {Foreign control in the Canadian economy}, as stipulated in the Corporations Returns Act. This report draws a national profile of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy, examining financial and ownership information on corporations conducting business in Canada. This information is used to evaluate the extent and effect of non-resident control of the Canadian corporate economy. The report includes charts and tables providing time series on selected financial characteristics (assets, operating revenue and operating profits) by specific country of control and classified by major industry groups. The statistics provided in the Corporations Returns Act report are presented at the 21-industry level, using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). Previous versions of this report may use different industry classification systems. The industry system used will be referenced within the specific version.

    Release date: 2018-08-01

  • Table: 12-581-X
    Description:

    Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and environment. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Table: 36-27-0002
    Description:

    The data shown in this page correspond to the data described on the International Monetary Fund's Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB).

    Release date: 2018-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500614219
    Description:

    This article describes new quarterly estimates of household sector debt payments (mortgage and non-mortgage), including both interest and principal components, from 1990 to the present.

    Release date: 2015-09-01

  • Table: 11-210-X
    Description:

    This companion volume contains historical annual series that correspond to those published in the monthly tables. It includes Canada-wide data on the national accounts, prices, international and domestic trade, labour and financial markets, as well as provincial data on employment earnings, retail trade, housing and consumer price indexes.

    Release date: 2011-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800410559
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite the turmoil in financial markets and a slowdown in the US, Canada's growth was remarkably steady in 2007. This reflects the ongoing boom in the resource sector and the boost the rising loonie gave to domestic spending.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113155
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the last three years, low interest rates have spurred a surge in home construction, and strong world demand has stimulated natural resource industries. At the same time, a soaring loonie has created challenges for Canadian manufacturing. This article examines these three industries, looking at the labour market impact in the resource-rich western provinces and the large manufacturing base in central Canada.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Burkart and Ellingsen (2004) develop a model of trade credit and bank credit rationing which predicts that trade credit will be used by medium-wealth and low-wealth firms to help ease bank credit rationing. This paper tests this and other predictions of the Burkart and Ellingsen model using a large sample of more than 28,000 Canadian firms. The author uses an endogenous method to divide the firms into the appropriate wealth categories rather than arbitrarily selecting firms likely to be credit-rationed. The data support the main predictions of the model quite well. The author finds that medium-wealth firms substitute trade credit for bank credit consistent with using it to alleviate bank credit rationing. The low-wealth firms use trade credit but it is positively linked to bank credit, suggesting those firms are constrained in both bank credit and trade credit markets, and so cannot use trade credit to adjust as much to negative shocks. The findings also suggest that there are very few unconstrained, high-wealth Canadian firms. The author also finds low-wealth, declining and distressed firms supply proportionally more trade credit than firms with healthier balance sheets.

    Release date: 2005-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050108758
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The current boom in housing reflects not just low interest rates, but also a number of factors such as population changes, migration and household formation. These will continue to support housing even if interest rates rise.

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040127744
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent media reports suggest that the ratio of gross national income (formerly gross national product) to gross domestic product reflects a nation's 'economic maturity'. Nations at a higher stage of economic development generally have a GNI larger than GDP because of their past investments abroad. Less developed countries that depend on large inflows of foreign investment to finance their growth have a smaller GNI than GDP. This article analyzes how relevant these suggestions are for the Canadian economy. Since 1998, our ratio of GNI to GNP has risen 96% to 98%. In dollar terms, Canadians would have received $16.4 billion less income if GNI had grown only as fast as GDP, equivalent to $512 for every Canadian. Based on recent trends, Canada's GNI could outstrip its GDP for the first time on record before the end of the current decade.

    Release date: 2004-12-16
Data (4)

Data (4) ((4 results))

  • Table: 61-220-X
    Description:

    Each year, Statistics Canada produces a report on foreign control {Foreign control in the Canadian economy}, as stipulated in the Corporations Returns Act. This report draws a national profile of foreign control in the Canadian corporate economy, examining financial and ownership information on corporations conducting business in Canada. This information is used to evaluate the extent and effect of non-resident control of the Canadian corporate economy. The report includes charts and tables providing time series on selected financial characteristics (assets, operating revenue and operating profits) by specific country of control and classified by major industry groups. The statistics provided in the Corporations Returns Act report are presented at the 21-industry level, using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS Canada 2012). Previous versions of this report may use different industry classification systems. The industry system used will be referenced within the specific version.

    Release date: 2018-08-01

  • Table: 12-581-X
    Description:

    Canada at a Glance presents current statistics on Canadian demography, education, health and aging, justice, housing, income, labour market, household, economy, travel, finance, agriculture, foreign trade and environment. This booklet also includes important international comparisons, so that readers can see how Canada stacks up against its neighbours. Updated yearly, Canada at a Glance is a very useful reference for those who want quick access to current Canadian statistics.

    Release date: 2018-03-27

  • Table: 36-27-0002
    Description:

    The data shown in this page correspond to the data described on the International Monetary Fund's Dissemination Standards Bulletin Board (DSBB).

    Release date: 2018-03-20

  • Table: 11-210-X
    Description:

    This companion volume contains historical annual series that correspond to those published in the monthly tables. It includes Canada-wide data on the national accounts, prices, international and domestic trade, labour and financial markets, as well as provincial data on employment earnings, retail trade, housing and consumer price indexes.

    Release date: 2011-07-14
Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201500614219
    Description:

    This article describes new quarterly estimates of household sector debt payments (mortgage and non-mortgage), including both interest and principal components, from 1990 to the present.

    Release date: 2015-09-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200800410559
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite the turmoil in financial markets and a slowdown in the US, Canada's growth was remarkably steady in 2007. This reflects the ongoing boom in the resource sector and the boost the rising loonie gave to domestic spending.

    Release date: 2008-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610113155
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the last three years, low interest rates have spurred a surge in home construction, and strong world demand has stimulated natural resource industries. At the same time, a soaring loonie has created challenges for Canadian manufacturing. This article examines these three industries, looking at the labour market impact in the resource-rich western provinces and the large manufacturing base in central Canada.

    Release date: 2006-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005036
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Burkart and Ellingsen (2004) develop a model of trade credit and bank credit rationing which predicts that trade credit will be used by medium-wealth and low-wealth firms to help ease bank credit rationing. This paper tests this and other predictions of the Burkart and Ellingsen model using a large sample of more than 28,000 Canadian firms. The author uses an endogenous method to divide the firms into the appropriate wealth categories rather than arbitrarily selecting firms likely to be credit-rationed. The data support the main predictions of the model quite well. The author finds that medium-wealth firms substitute trade credit for bank credit consistent with using it to alleviate bank credit rationing. The low-wealth firms use trade credit but it is positively linked to bank credit, suggesting those firms are constrained in both bank credit and trade credit markets, and so cannot use trade credit to adjust as much to negative shocks. The findings also suggest that there are very few unconstrained, high-wealth Canadian firms. The author also finds low-wealth, declining and distressed firms supply proportionally more trade credit than firms with healthier balance sheets.

    Release date: 2005-11-04

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050108758
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The current boom in housing reflects not just low interest rates, but also a number of factors such as population changes, migration and household formation. These will continue to support housing even if interest rates rise.

    Release date: 2005-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040127744
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent media reports suggest that the ratio of gross national income (formerly gross national product) to gross domestic product reflects a nation's 'economic maturity'. Nations at a higher stage of economic development generally have a GNI larger than GDP because of their past investments abroad. Less developed countries that depend on large inflows of foreign investment to finance their growth have a smaller GNI than GDP. This article analyzes how relevant these suggestions are for the Canadian economy. Since 1998, our ratio of GNI to GNP has risen 96% to 98%. In dollar terms, Canadians would have received $16.4 billion less income if GNI had grown only as fast as GDP, equivalent to $512 for every Canadian. Based on recent trends, Canada's GNI could outstrip its GDP for the first time on record before the end of the current decade.

    Release date: 2004-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040056871
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This publication examines growth in gross domestic product across provinces, using data on interest rates, exports and imports.

    Release date: 2004-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004012
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines retail sales and household expenditures data from 1997 to 2002 to show the impact of homebuyers on furniture and appliance spending.

    Release date: 2004-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014744
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economy was booming in 1997. The economy, as measured by the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), grew 3.8% in 1997, its best performance since 1994 and the second best this decade.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1998007
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Over the years, the concept of core inflation has become of crucial importance for the central banks of various countries. Indeed, many of them have at some point given themselves the mandate to reduce inflation and achieve price stability. The Bank of Canada undertook this mandate in February 1991.

    Core inflation should reflect what is basic in price movements and ignore temporary fluctuations that have no long-term impact on prices. The phenomenon of core inflation must be of a lasting nature. The targets were initially set on the basis of the overall consumer price index (CPI). However, the Bank of Canada has stated that for practical reasons, it will focus on the consumer price index excluding the volatile food and energy components.

    The question that many are asking is the following: is a measure such as the CPI excluding food and energy a good indicator of core inflation? At the meeting of the 1996 Price Measurement Advisory Committee, a review of the literature on core inflation was presented. The Committee recommended taking a closer look at a weighted median index as a means of estimating core inflation. This study deals with the question of a weighted median index and covers the period of January 1985 to January 1997. The rates of change in the weighted median index calculated from monthly movements are quite often lower than the rates of change in the official index. This behaviour reflects the usual distribution of monthly price movements for the CPI, meaning a large proportion of the monthly movements are close to zero, and the remaining price movements are, in majority, positive. Because of this behaviour of monthly movements, the weighted median index advances much more slowly than the official index. This behaviour is just as evident when inflation advances at annual rates of 4% to 5% as when it ranges around 2%. An index based on the weighted median of monthly movements in the CPI yields somewhat disconcerting results. Even though some think that the official CPI does not clearly reflect the concept of core inflation, one does not necessarily expect to see such a large gap develop over time.

    Release date: 1999-10-05
Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

No content available at this time.

Date modified: