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  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010004
    Description:

    It is widely acknowledged that information and communications technologies (ICTs) have led to major innovations in business models and play an important role in firms' competitiveness and productivity.

    Because of the lack of statistics, however, there have been few Canadian studies of the deployment of electronic business (e-business) processes within firms. E-commerce was one of the first online activities to attract attention, and we now know a little more about it, yet e-commerce is just one of the many business processes supported by Internet-based business networks. In Canada, very little information is available about how ICTs are used to manage operating processes such as the logistics functions of delivery and inventory management and the marketing and client relations functions.

    In 2007, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology collected data for the first time on the deployment of Internet-based systems to manage various e-business processes. The Survey also asked firms about the internal and external integration of the systems that manage those e-business processes.

    Based on these new data, the study begins with a description of e-business adoption in Canada and then explores the benefits that firms see in doing business over the Internet. This study provides a clearer picture of how Canadian firms are deploying e-business processes, broken down by industry, size and type of e-business use.

    Release date: 2010-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511050
    Description:

    This article draws on information contained in the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which includes annual data from 1992 to 2007, to provide an overview of trends in university graduations in Canada and the provinces. That overview provides an overall view of the characteristics of university graduates over the period, from trends in the gender and age composition of graduates and in the share of graduates accounted for by international students to changes in the fields of study chosen by graduates.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800110539
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Households across the country regularly produce special wastes ranging from dead batteries to old paint containers. This study focuses on four special wastes for which information was collected in the 2006 Households and the Environment Survey' leftover or expired medication, dead batteries, old computer and communication equipment and leftover paint.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007005
    Description:

    This working paper provides results from a pilot survey on nanotechnology, which was appended to the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. The paper presents the conceptual issues and survey challenges relating to measurement of nanotechnology-related activities, as well as preliminary data on nanotechnology firms in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 56-505-X
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2001-03-26

  • Table: 63-222-X
    Description:

    This publication contains the principal statistics for businesses providing computer services as a major activity. Data are presented by size group and province, and include class of customer, operating expenses and revenue distribution by type of service. The publication includes data analysis and discussion of survey objectives, questionnaire content, methodology and notes on data quality.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (43)

Analysis (43) (0 to 10 of 43 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010004
    Description:

    It is widely acknowledged that information and communications technologies (ICTs) have led to major innovations in business models and play an important role in firms' competitiveness and productivity.

    Because of the lack of statistics, however, there have been few Canadian studies of the deployment of electronic business (e-business) processes within firms. E-commerce was one of the first online activities to attract attention, and we now know a little more about it, yet e-commerce is just one of the many business processes supported by Internet-based business networks. In Canada, very little information is available about how ICTs are used to manage operating processes such as the logistics functions of delivery and inventory management and the marketing and client relations functions.

    In 2007, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology collected data for the first time on the deployment of Internet-based systems to manage various e-business processes. The Survey also asked firms about the internal and external integration of the systems that manage those e-business processes.

    Based on these new data, the study begins with a description of e-business adoption in Canada and then explores the benefits that firms see in doing business over the Internet. This study provides a clearer picture of how Canadian firms are deploying e-business processes, broken down by industry, size and type of e-business use.

    Release date: 2010-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010002
    Description:

    This paper investigates the intensity and scope of Internet usage among individual Canadians, based on data from the 2005 and 2007 Canadian Internet Use Surveys (CIUS). It profiles various aspects of online behaviour and analyzes the 2007 findings to examine patterns of scope of Internet use by user characteristics. Multivariate analyses are applied to explore the relationships among Internet use behaviour and characteristics such as age, sex, income, and education.

    In addition to the shift from dial-up to high-speed Internet access that has been occurring among Canadian Internet users, the 2005 to 2007 period also saw a slight increase in the proportion of users who were online daily and for at least five hours per week. While this proportion is growing, fewer than 50% of Canadian Internet users were characterized as high intensity users in 2005 and 2007. Among individuals with high-speed connections, the low intensity users continued to outnumber the high intensity ones, challenging the notion that access to a high speed connection leads to intensive Internet usage. Among Internet users, age, income, sex, and years of online experience were all associated with the propensity to engage in online activities and to use the Internet intensively. The finding that experienced Internet users do use the Internet in more extensive ways underscores the importance of studying the nature of Internet users as they gain more experience.

    Release date: 2010-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511050
    Description:

    This article draws on information contained in the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which includes annual data from 1992 to 2007, to provide an overview of trends in university graduations in Canada and the provinces. That overview provides an overall view of the characteristics of university graduates over the period, from trends in the gender and age composition of graduates and in the share of graduates accounted for by international students to changes in the fields of study chosen by graduates.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800011013
    Description:

    Collecting data using audio recordings for interviewing can be an effective and versatile data collection tool. These recordings however can lead to large files which are cumbersome to manage. Technological developments including better audio software development tools and increased adoption of broadband connections has eased the burden in the collection of audio data. This paper focuses on technologies and techniques used to record and manage audio collected surveys using laptops, telephones and internet connections. The process outlined involves devices connecting directly to the phone receiver which streams conversations directly to the laptop for storage and transmission.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008315
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this paper asks (1) whether the changing characteristics of immigrants, notably the rise in the share with university education and in the "skilled economic" immigrant class, contributed positively to immigrant entry earnings during the 1990s, and (2) whether the entry earnings of immigrants improved after 2000, and if not, why not.

    We find that, through the 1990s, the rising number of entering immigrants with university degrees and in the skilled economic class did little to improve earnings at the bottom of the earnings distribution (and reduce poverty rates among entering immigrants), but the changes did increase earnings among immigrants at the middle and top of the earnings distribution. The increasing numbers of highly educated at the bottom of the earnings distribution were unable to convert their education and "skilled class" designation to higher earnings: they found themselves with low incomes. These outcomes may be related to language, credentialism, education quality, or supply issues, as discussed in the paper.

    We find that from 2000 to 2004, the entry earnings of immigrants renewed their slide, but for reasons that differed from the standard explanations of the earlier decline. Much of the fall after 2000 was concentrated among immigrants intending to practice in the information technology (IT) or engineering occupations. This coincided with the IT downturn, which appears to have significantly affected outcomes for these immigrants, particularly the men. Following the significant increase in supply in response to the call for more high-tech workers in the late 1990s, the large numbers of entering immigrants were faced with the IT downturn.

    Release date: 2009-04-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 56F0004M
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Connectedness series publishes analytical studies as well as research reports in the broad area of connectedness. This includes the industrial areas of telecommunications, broadcasting, computer services and Internet Service Providers as well as cross economy activities such as the Internet and electronic commerce. It offers a statistical perspective in these emerging phenomena that are changing the economic and societal landscape of the country.

    All papers are subject to peer and institutional review as well as review by subject matter experts, as necessary.

    Release date: 2008-12-04

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200800110539
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Households across the country regularly produce special wastes ranging from dead batteries to old paint containers. This study focuses on four special wastes for which information was collected in the 2006 Households and the Environment Survey' leftover or expired medication, dead batteries, old computer and communication equipment and leftover paint.

    Release date: 2008-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2007015
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper illustrates how the statistical architecture of Canada's System of National Accounts can be utilized to study the size and composition of a specific economic sector. For illustrative purposes, the analysis focuses on the information and communications technology (ICT) sector, and hence, on the set of technology-producing industries and technology outputs most commonly associated with what is often termed the high-technology economy. Using supply and use tables from the input-output accounts, we develop integrated ICT industry and commodity classifications that link domestic technology producers to their principal commodity outputs. We then use these classifications to generate a series of descriptive statistics that examine the size of Canada's high-technology economy along with its underlying composition. In our view, these integrated ICT classifications can be used to develop a richer profile of the high-technology economy than one obtains from examining its industry or commodity dimensions in isolation.

    Release date: 2007-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007005
    Description:

    This working paper provides results from a pilot survey on nanotechnology, which was appended to the Biotechnology Use and Development Survey 2005. The paper presents the conceptual issues and survey challenges relating to measurement of nanotechnology-related activities, as well as preliminary data on nanotechnology firms in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-08-31

  • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2006014
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses statistical information to begin to shed light on the outcomes and impacts of information and communications technology (ICT). Some of the expected outcomes associated with ICT are presented, while factual evidence is used to demonstrate that these outcomes have so far not materialized. The paperless office is the office that never happened, with consumption of paper at an all-time high and the business of transporting paper thriving. Professional travel has most likely increased during a period when the Internet and videoconferencing technology were taking-off; and, e-commerce sales do not justify recent fears of negative consequences on retail employment and real estate. The paper further demonstrates that some of the key outcomes of ICTs are manifested in changing behavioural patterns, including communication and spending patterns.

    Release date: 2006-11-10
Reference (6)

Reference (6) ((6 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 56F0003X
    Description:

    This electronic product is a comprehensive reference tool that contains an inventory of surveys, conducted by Statistics Canada, used to measure household/individual Internet use. Product features include survey names; descriptions (including information such as objective of survey, sample size, frequency, target group and response rate); user guides; charts and graphs. Also included is an extremely useful Questionnaire Comparability Chart that displays common content among questionnaires. This is a useful source of background information for respondents, researchers and those involved in survey development and questionnaire design.

    Release date: 2004-09-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62-014-X
    Description:

    The growth in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) sector has created a need for more sector-specific economic indicators. Prices Division at Statistics Canada (STC) currently produces price indexes for several ICT goods that include computers and computer equipment or peripherals (e.g., printers and monitors). These indexes measure the price movement of ICT goods at the final or end-purchaser level (i.e., government, businesses and households) for consumption. The ICT price index series are used by economists, industry analysts and the general public to track and comprehend events and trends as they occur in this important area of the ICT sector. Within STC, the series pertaining to consumers are used in the calculation of the Consumer Price Index. In addition, several series are used by the Canadian System of National Accounts in deflating the value of gross investment by government and businesses. This reference document outlines what ICT goods price indexes are produced and their underlying data sources and methodology.

    Release date: 2003-10-30

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020038526
    Description:

    The definition of the Information and communications technologies (ICT) sector will be modified to conform more closely to the international standard developed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Specifically, libraries and the retailing of ICT commodities will be removed from the aggregation, but due to data limitations we will not include the repair of ICT equipment in our aggregation. The estimates will be reworked back to January 1997.

    Release date: 2002-09-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016234
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    With the goal of obtaining a complete enumeration of the Canadian agricultural sector, the 2001 Census of Agriculture has been conducted using several collection methods. Challenges to the traditional drop-off and mail-back of paper questionnaires in a household-based enumeration have led to the adoption of supplemental methods using newer technologies to maintain the coverage and content of the census. Overall, this mixed-mode data collection process responds to the critical needs of the census programme at various points. This paper examines these data collection methods, several quality assessments, and the future challenges of obtaining a co-ordinated view of the methods' individual approaches to achieving data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Notices and consultations: 13-605-X20020018528
    Description:

    As of January 31, 2002 the monthly GDP by industry estimates will include Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) series. Three new aggregation series for the Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) sector and its manufacturing and services components are available back to January 1997 on CANSIM II.

    Release date: 2002-01-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-534-X
    Description:

    This report describes the Electronic Publications Pilot (EPP) which was conducted to gather knowledge on how library staff and their clients are adjusting to the Internet. The pilot was conducted from September 1996 to September 1997 as a joint initiative of Statistics Canada and the Depository Services Program (DSP), in partnership with the depository library community. The objective of the pilot was to assess the impact of replacing print publications with electronic equivalents via the Internet in DSP libraries. This objective was based on an assumption that the electronic medium will complement print rather than replace it entirely and that departments will continue to produce some print publications in the future. The major conclusions of the pilot cover resources and training, web site feedback, selection of publications for conversion to electronic format, web site access and security, publication functionality and access and archiving.

    Release date: 1999-01-28
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