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All (7)

All (7) ((7 results))

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2022007
    Description:

    This document describes the methodology and data source for the monthly average retail prices table. This supplement also explains the difference between the Consumer Price Index and average retail prices in context of inflation.

    Release date: 2022-05-04

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020015
    Description:

    This interactive calculator allows users to create a personal inflation time-series. Users enter dollar amounts in the common expense categories to produce a personalized inflation rate, which will more closely approximate an individual’s inflation experience than the average measure of inflation - the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    The Personal Inflation Calculator displays your personal index, 12-month percentage change, or 1-month percentage change in personal inflation alongside the official CPI in an interactive chart, allowing the user to compare inflation estimates over time in selected geographies.

    This web-based application is updated monthly, as the data for the latest CPI reference month become available.

    Release date: 2020-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2003016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For a long time, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) has been the most commonly referenced measure of inflation. However, it is not generally perceived how sensitive the CPI is to the measurement of price change for owned accommodation. The relative importance of the homeownership component in the CPI and the movement of that component are critically dependent on the choice of concept for estimating homeownership costs. However, there is no one concept that is generally agreed upon by official statistical agencies. As part of an ongoing research program into major issues involved in the construction of consumer price indexes, analytical indexes of consumer prices based on different treatments of owned accommodation are updated in this publication for the period 1995 to 2000.

    This paper presents seven alternative homeownership series based on four different concepts, including one based on the current concept used in the official CPI. Series are also shown for higher-level aggregates, including indexes at the All-items level. All of these higher-level aggregates differ only in their owned accommodation components, for all aggregates and all other components are based on the official concept.

    Release date: 2003-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1997005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since 1961, the service component of the Canadian Consumer Price Index (CPI) has generally shown a higher rate of increase than the goods component. Furthermore, when some of the more volatile components of the CPI are removed the spread widens. For instance, during the same period core goods inflation (excluding food and energy) increased at an annual rate of 4.3% compared to 6.1% per cent for services (excluding shelter). The literature on service sector inflation suggests five explanations for this phenomenon. Although all these sources of the inflation differential are interesting and important in their own right, this paper will examine two. Some believe that service inflation is a statistical artifact stemming from the inherent difficulties in measuring the output of services and hence their price changes. This issue will be examined first. Indeed the measurement problem appears more serious for services; however it cannot be held completely responsible for the inflationary gap. William Baumol (1967) originally suggested the other cause for higher service inflation whereby unbalanced sectorial growth would be the cause of the divergent inflation rates. This explanation will be the focus of the second part of the paper. In spite of the attractiveness of Baumol's model, empirical evidence rejects the hypothesis.

    Release date: 1999-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034329
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Price inflation for Canadian consumers has thus far been much lower in the 1990s than in the previous two decades. This has especially been the case for the prices of consumer goods. In the 1990-97 period, the price index for consumer goods rose by just 16%. However, the 1990s inflation rate for consumer services was a markedly higher 26%.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M19970103357
    Description:

    The ABS currently publishes a wide range of separate consumer, producer and international trade price indexes, each relating to a particular segment of economic activity, as well as implicit price deflators and fixed weighted indexes derived from the national accounts. These individual indexes can be considered as partial indicators as they each relate to a particular economic activity. Each index was developed to meet specific requirements and is released in its own separate, specialized publication, with substantial differences in profile. The Consumer Price Index is frequently used as a measure of inflation but it has a number of conceptual shortcomings for such purposes. In recent years, there has been increasing international attention directed towards developing new approaches to the measurement of inflation. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline the framework and current or future developments in the field of price statistics. The paper concludes that although no studies of bias have been undertaken in the Australian CPI, it is believed that any bias is likely to be small.

    Release date: 1997-10-02
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2020015
    Description:

    This interactive calculator allows users to create a personal inflation time-series. Users enter dollar amounts in the common expense categories to produce a personalized inflation rate, which will more closely approximate an individual’s inflation experience than the average measure of inflation - the Consumer Price Index (CPI).

    The Personal Inflation Calculator displays your personal index, 12-month percentage change, or 1-month percentage change in personal inflation alongside the official CPI in an interactive chart, allowing the user to compare inflation estimates over time in selected geographies.

    This web-based application is updated monthly, as the data for the latest CPI reference month become available.

    Release date: 2020-11-18
Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) ((6 results))

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2022007
    Description:

    This document describes the methodology and data source for the monthly average retail prices table. This supplement also explains the difference between the Consumer Price Index and average retail prices in context of inflation.

    Release date: 2022-05-04

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M2003016
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For a long time, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) has been the most commonly referenced measure of inflation. However, it is not generally perceived how sensitive the CPI is to the measurement of price change for owned accommodation. The relative importance of the homeownership component in the CPI and the movement of that component are critically dependent on the choice of concept for estimating homeownership costs. However, there is no one concept that is generally agreed upon by official statistical agencies. As part of an ongoing research program into major issues involved in the construction of consumer price indexes, analytical indexes of consumer prices based on different treatments of owned accommodation are updated in this publication for the period 1995 to 2000.

    This paper presents seven alternative homeownership series based on four different concepts, including one based on the current concept used in the official CPI. Series are also shown for higher-level aggregates, including indexes at the All-items level. All of these higher-level aggregates differ only in their owned accommodation components, for all aggregates and all other components are based on the official concept.

    Release date: 2003-04-10

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M1997005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Since 1961, the service component of the Canadian Consumer Price Index (CPI) has generally shown a higher rate of increase than the goods component. Furthermore, when some of the more volatile components of the CPI are removed the spread widens. For instance, during the same period core goods inflation (excluding food and energy) increased at an annual rate of 4.3% compared to 6.1% per cent for services (excluding shelter). The literature on service sector inflation suggests five explanations for this phenomenon. Although all these sources of the inflation differential are interesting and important in their own right, this paper will examine two. Some believe that service inflation is a statistical artifact stemming from the inherent difficulties in measuring the output of services and hence their price changes. This issue will be examined first. Indeed the measurement problem appears more serious for services; however it cannot be held completely responsible for the inflationary gap. William Baumol (1967) originally suggested the other cause for higher service inflation whereby unbalanced sectorial growth would be the cause of the divergent inflation rates. This explanation will be the focus of the second part of the paper. In spite of the attractiveness of Baumol's model, empirical evidence rejects the hypothesis.

    Release date: 1999-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034329
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Price inflation for Canadian consumers has thus far been much lower in the 1990s than in the previous two decades. This has especially been the case for the prices of consumer goods. In the 1990-97 period, the price index for consumer goods rose by just 16%. However, the 1990s inflation rate for consumer services was a markedly higher 26%.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19980044043
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This profile of unionized women covers demographic and labour characteristics, wages, benefits and work arrangements. Also included are selected union statistics for both men and women. (This is an updated version of an article released shortly before Labour Day, 1998).

    Release date: 1998-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 62F0014M19970103357
    Description:

    The ABS currently publishes a wide range of separate consumer, producer and international trade price indexes, each relating to a particular segment of economic activity, as well as implicit price deflators and fixed weighted indexes derived from the national accounts. These individual indexes can be considered as partial indicators as they each relate to a particular economic activity. Each index was developed to meet specific requirements and is released in its own separate, specialized publication, with substantial differences in profile. The Consumer Price Index is frequently used as a measure of inflation but it has a number of conceptual shortcomings for such purposes. In recent years, there has been increasing international attention directed towards developing new approaches to the measurement of inflation. The purpose of this paper is to briefly outline the framework and current or future developments in the field of price statistics. The paper concludes that although no studies of bias have been undertaken in the Australian CPI, it is believed that any bias is likely to be small.

    Release date: 1997-10-02
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