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  • Public use microdata: 98M0002X
    Description:

    This Hierarchical File, 2016 Census Public Use Microdata File (PUMF) product provides access to non-aggregated data covering a sample of 1% of the Canadian households. It is a comprehensive social, demographic and economic database about Canada and its people, and contains a wealth of characteristics on the population. The file enables the study of individuals in relation to their census families, economic families and households. Geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces, the three territories grouped into a region called Northern Canada and selected metropolitan areas (Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary) to ensure respondents’ anonymity. This comprehensive file is excellent tool for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modeling and performing statistical regression analysis using 2016 Census microdata.

    This product contains the data file (in ASCII format); user documentation and supporting information; all licence agreements; and SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. It is important to note that users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages (or software) such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to use this product.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019005
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article quantifies the degree to which families who expect their financial situation to get better in the next two years have, all else equal, more debt than comparable families. The data are drawn from the Survey of Financial Security for 1999, 2005 and 2016. The term “family” is used to refer to family units and includes economic families and unattached individuals. Debt and income estimates are shown in 2016 dollars. The study shows that even after a large set of socioeconomic characteristics is controlled for, families who expect their financial situation to improve in the near future have significantly more debt and generally higher debt-to-income ratios than other families.

    Release date: 2019-04-04

  • Table: 95F0217X1996005
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 2019-03-03

  • Table: 95F0199X1996002
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 2019-01-14

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2017001
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the treatment of drinking water by Canadian households. This publication covers some water treatment techniques, the reasons provided by households to explain their behavior, and various characteristics of households that have a link with their tendency to treat water.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015008
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at at changes in household size from 1941 to 2011.

    Release date: 2015-11-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-002-X2011001
    Description:

    This report describes sampling and weighting procedures used in the 2011 National Household Survey. It provides operational and theoretical justifications for them, and presents the results of the evaluation studies of these procedures.

    Release date: 2015-01-28

  • Public use microdata: 75M0010X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a collection of income, labour and family variables on persons in Canada and their families. This file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person.

    Although often referred to as a single file, the SLID public-use microdata file is actually four separate files: key, person, economic family and census family.

    The person file contains identifier data, which allows a researcher to group persons into households, economic families and census families, as well as link each of these files together.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Table: 98-312-X2011047
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families. Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household. This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20
Data (230)

Data (230) (0 to 10 of 230 results)

  • Public use microdata: 98M0002X
    Description:

    This Hierarchical File, 2016 Census Public Use Microdata File (PUMF) product provides access to non-aggregated data covering a sample of 1% of the Canadian households. It is a comprehensive social, demographic and economic database about Canada and its people, and contains a wealth of characteristics on the population. The file enables the study of individuals in relation to their census families, economic families and households. Geographic identifiers have been restricted to the provinces, the three territories grouped into a region called Northern Canada and selected metropolitan areas (Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver, Edmonton and Calgary) to ensure respondents’ anonymity. This comprehensive file is excellent tool for policy analysts, pollsters, social researchers and anyone interested in modeling and performing statistical regression analysis using 2016 Census microdata.

    This product contains the data file (in ASCII format); user documentation and supporting information; all licence agreements; and SAS, SPSS and Stata program source codes to enable users to read the set of records. It is important to note that users will require knowledge of data manipulation packages (or software) such as SAS, SPSS or Stata to use this product.

    Release date: 2019-06-18

  • Table: 95F0217X1996005
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 2019-03-03

  • Table: 95F0199X1996002
    Description:

    Series Description - The Basic Summary Tabulations Series (1996 Census of Population) provides data based on approximately 75 cross-tabulations of three or four census variables at five very detailed levels of geography. This series shows specific characteristics of the Canadian population considered either as individuals or in terms of their family or household relations, or with a characteristic pertaining to Canadian dwellings. The BSTs provide data based on a 20% sample except for Age, Sex, Marital Status and Common-law Status which are collected from a 100% sample.

    These tables are available on diskette and cover all census variable information such as Demographics; Families (Number, Type and Structure); Structural Type of Dwelling and Household Size; Immigration and Citizenship; Languages (e.g. Mother Tongue); Aboriginal Origins, Ethnic Origin and Visible Minorities (Population Groups); Labour Market Activities and Household Activities (unpaid work); Place of Work and Mode of Transportation; Education; Mobility and Migration; as well as Individual and Family Income.

    For ease in understanding the five levels of geography, the OLC numbers have related the last 3 digits to reflect the different geographies. See the information below.

    **Under Geographic Coverage, we have listed the five geographies with OLC numbers.

    BSTs ending with the following OLC #s represent:

    001 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Census Divisions and Census Subdivisions002 - Census Metropolitan Areas, Tracted Census Agglomerations and Census Tracts003 - Canada, Provinces, Territories, Federal Electoral Districts (1987 Representation Order) and Enumeration Areas004 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Federal Electoral Districts (1996 Representation Order)005 - Canada, Provinces, Territories and Forward Sortation Areas

    Release date: 2019-01-14

  • Public use microdata: 75M0010X
    Description:

    The cross-sectional public-use microdata file for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) is a collection of income, labour and family variables on persons in Canada and their families. This file includes many safeguards to prevent the identification of any one person.

    Although often referred to as a single file, the SLID public-use microdata file is actually four separate files: key, person, economic family and census family.

    The person file contains identifier data, which allows a researcher to group persons into households, economic families and census families, as well as link each of these files together.

    Release date: 2014-07-30

  • Table: 98-312-X2011047
    Description:

    This topic presents data on census families, including the number of families, family size and structure. The data also include persons living in families, with relatives, with non-relatives and living alone. Family structure refers to the classification of census families into married couples or common-law couples (including opposite-sex or same-sex), and lone-parent families. Data are also presented on household characteristics. The household type refers to the number and types of census families living in a household. The household size refers to the number of people in the household. This topic also presents data on marital status and common-law relationships, by age and sex, for the entire Canadian population. These data show the number of persons who never-married, are married, separated, divorced or widowed, and those who are not married, whether they are living common-law or not.

    Release date: 2014-05-21

  • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
    Description:

    The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

    The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

    Release date: 2013-12-20

  • Table: 99-010-X2011037
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data from the National Household Survey using selected characteristics of the following variables: Immigration, Citizenship, Place of birth, Ethnic origin, Visible minority, Religion and Language.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • Table: 99-014-X2011047
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • Table: 99-014-X2011048
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-12-11
Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (0 to 10 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2019005
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article quantifies the degree to which families who expect their financial situation to get better in the next two years have, all else equal, more debt than comparable families. The data are drawn from the Survey of Financial Security for 1999, 2005 and 2016. The term “family” is used to refer to family units and includes economic families and unattached individuals. Debt and income estimates are shown in 2016 dollars. The study shows that even after a large set of socioeconomic characteristics is controlled for, families who expect their financial situation to improve in the near future have significantly more debt and generally higher debt-to-income ratios than other families.

    Release date: 2019-04-04

  • Stats in brief: 16-508-X2017001
    Description:

    This fact sheet looks at the treatment of drinking water by Canadian households. This publication covers some water treatment techniques, the reasons provided by households to explain their behavior, and various characteristics of households that have a link with their tendency to treat water.

    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2015008
    Description:

    In this edition of Canadian Megatrends, we look at at changes in household size from 1941 to 2011.

    Release date: 2015-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2013001
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2010.

    Release date: 2013-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Stats in brief: 98-312-X201100311703
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    These short analytical articles provide complementary analysis to the 2011 Census analytical document. These articles allow for a more in-depth look to relevant topics related to the Canadian population. The four articles linked to the families, households and marital status release and the structural type of dwelling and collectives release are entitled 'Fifty years of families in Canada,' ' Canadian households in 2011: Type and growth,' 'Living arrangements of young adults aged 20 to 29' and 'Living arrangements of seniors.'

    Release date: 2012-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200211636
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to study various aspects of household debt. It examines the characteristics of borrowers and the types of households that are more likely to carry debt. The paper also looks at the association between financial knowledge and the amount of debt held, using multivariate techniques.

    Release date: 2012-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010995
    Description:

    In 1992, a paper entitled "The Optimum Time at which to Conduct Survey Interviews" sought to illustrate the economic benefits to market research organisations in structuring the calling pattern of interviewers in household surveys. The findings were based on the Welsh Inter Censal Survey in 1986. This paper now brings additional information on the calling patterns of interviewers from similar surveys in 1997 and 2006 to ascertain whether the calling patterns of interviewers have changed. The results also examine the importance of having a survey response that is representative of the population, and how efficient calling strategies can help achieve this.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 83-003-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) is the first nationally representative survey to focus on the working conditions and health of Canada's nurses. Registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) in all provinces and territories shared their perceptions on a variety of topics, including:- workload- working overtime, whether paid or unpaid- adverse events such as medication errors and patient falls- support and respect from co-workers and supervisors- staffing adequacy- working relations with physicians- their own chronic diseases and injuries- their mental health.

    The 2005 NSWHN was developed in collaboration with organizations representing practicing nurses, health care researchers, health information specialists and federal government departments. The survey was conducted by Statistics Canada in partnership with the Canadian Institute for Health Information and Health Canada. A total of 18,676 nurses were interviewed, representing LPNs, RNs and RPNs in a variety of health care settings and in all provinces and territories. The survey's impressive response rate of 80% reflects the enthusiasm and support of nurses across the country.

    The survey collected information on a rich array of topics reflecting the physical and emotional challenges nurses face in delivering patient care today. Nurses answered many questions about the quality of patient care, working relations with co-workers and managers, the amount of time they work to get their jobs done, and the way they feel about their jobs and careers as nurses. Data from the 2005 NSWHN will provide an invaluable resource for researchers, health care providers, policy makers and anyone with an interest in human resources, particularly in the health care field.

    Release date: 2006-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006052
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    The 2005 National Survey of the Work and Health of Nurses (NSWHN) represents a collaborative effort involving the Canadian Institute for Health Information, Health Canada, and Statistics Canada.

    The NSWHN was designed to examine links between the work environment and the health of regulated nurses in Canada, and is the first nationally representative survey of its kind. The survey's high response rate (80%) reflects the enthusiasm with which nurses involved themselves in the survey.

    Nearly 19,000 regulated nurses, representing registered nurses (RNs), licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and registered psychiatric nurses (RPNs) across the country were interviewed on a variety of topics, including the conditions in which they practice, the challenges they face in doing their jobs, and their physical and mental wellbeing.

    They shared their perceptions of work organization, including staffing, shift work, overtime and employee support. Nurses were also asked about work stress, role overload, respect, and quality of patient care. Information about their health status, such as chronic conditions, pain, self-perceived general and mental health, medication use, and the impact of health on the performance of nursing duties, was also collected.

    This document presents key findings from the 2005 NSWHN for each province, as well as for the three territories combined.

    Release date: 2006-12-11
Reference (10)

Reference (10) ((10 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-002-X2011001
    Description:

    This report describes sampling and weighting procedures used in the 2011 National Household Survey. It provides operational and theoretical justifications for them, and presents the results of the evaluation studies of these procedures.

    Release date: 2015-01-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M2011004
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on income developments, including survey design issues, data quality evaluation and exploratory research for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics in 2009.

    Release date: 2011-10-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 97-553-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topic: Family variables.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2007-10-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005002
    Description:

    This document will provide an overview of the differences between the old and the new weighting methodologies and the effect of the new weighting system on estimations.

    Release date: 2005-06-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004003
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending, which gathers information on the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households.

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. One section describes the statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share and aggregates).

    Release date: 2004-12-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001004
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces. (The three territories are surveyed every second year starting in 2001.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables, as well as descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2001-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1998 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2001002
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 1999 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret data, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, imputation rates and the impact of imputed data on the estimates. Added to these are various less often used indicators such as slippage rates and measures of the representativity of the sample for particular characteristics that are useful for evaluating the survey methodology.

    Release date: 2001-10-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2000005
    Description:

    This guide presents information of interest to users of data from the Survey of Household Spending. Data are collected via personal interview conducted in January, February and March after the reference year using a paper questionnaire. Information is gathered about the spending habits, dwelling characteristics and household equipment of Canadian households during the reference year. The survey covers private households in the ten provinces and three territories. (The three territories are surveyed every second year.)

    This guide includes definitions of survey terms and variables and descriptions of survey methodology and data quality. There is also a section describing the various statistics that can be created using expenditure data (e.g., budget share, market share, and aggregates).

    Release date: 2000-12-12

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0002M1994006
    Description:

    This paper documents the work done to date on the construction of derived variables at the household and family levels for the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID).

    Release date: 1995-12-30
Date modified: