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  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2018002
    Description:

    This article reports on recent labour market trends for full-time students aged 15 to 24 since the 2008-2009 recession. The analysis is based on data from Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2018-09-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611405
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) to draw a portrait of the changing make-up of international students enrolled in Canadian universities on either a part-time or full-time basis over the 1992 to 2008 period. This portrait shows how different international students are today compared to their counterparts in the early 1990s by examining changes that are evident in their university program levels and fields of study, age and gender composition, source countries and destinations within Canada.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Table: 81-595-M2007058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report applies various assumptions regarding future participation rates in postsecondary education to projected demographic trends to create three scenarios that estimate the potential future population of students in postsecondary institutions in Canada and the provinces. Projections are provided separately for enrolments at the college and the university levels for three age cohorts: 17 to 19 year-olds, 20 to 24 year-olds and 25 to 29 year-olds. Demographic trends and participation rates in college and in university both vary widely across provinces. To reflect these differences, the analysis is presented at both a national level and for each of the ten provinces. At the national level, the sample size is large enough to allow analysis of trends in both full- and part-time enrolment at the national level; at the provincial level, we constrain our enquiry to full-time only. Demographic data on historical and projected population trends for each of the three age cohorts was provided by Demography Division, Statistics Canada, for the 1990 to 2031 period. Historical college and university participation rates were calculated as the ratio of enrolment to population for the three age cohorts as reported by the Labour Force Survey (LFS). We capture enrolments for the academic year through averaging enrolments over the eight-month period between September and April, for the academic years from 1990/1991 to 2005/2006. Because of the coverage of the LFS, the population considered is that of the ten provinces. Projections of possible future enrolment levels are provided based on three sets of assumptions or 'what if' scenarios: Scenario 1: Maintaining the status quo What if college and university participation rates remain at the average level over the 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 period? Scenario 2: Growth in line with historical trends What if national postsecondary participation rates were to maintain historical trends observed over the 1990/1991 to 2005/2006 period until 2016/2017, remaining constant thereafter? Scenario 3: Closing the gender gap What if, in future, male participation rates in postsecondary education matched the higher rates observed for females over the 2002/2003 to 2005/2006 period?

    Release date: 2007-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313160
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Every year the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) provides approximately $1.5 billion in loans and $80 million in grants to students with a demonstrated financial need. Nevertheless, a gap in postsecondary participation remains between children from upper- and lower-income backgrounds. While it is difficult to estimate the extent to which the CSLP has made it possible for low-income students to obtain a postsecondary education, the study looks at how well loans are targeted to low-income youth, the extent to which the loan amount reflects financial need, and the impact of parental income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048040
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using cross-sectional data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study examines whether the number of hours worked by full-time students aged 15 to 17 is associated with smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. As well, longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey were used to determine if work hours are related to the initiation of smoking and alcohol consumption, and to changes in physical activity over a two-year period.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • 81C0049
    Description:

    This annual survey collects data on the tuition and living accommodation costs at Canadian universities.

    Release date: 2005-04-01

  • Table: 97F0017X2001003
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001003.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001004
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001005
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001005.

    Release date: 2003-03-11
Data (8)

Data (8) ((8 results))

  • Table: 81-595-M2007058
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report applies various assumptions regarding future participation rates in postsecondary education to projected demographic trends to create three scenarios that estimate the potential future population of students in postsecondary institutions in Canada and the provinces. Projections are provided separately for enrolments at the college and the university levels for three age cohorts: 17 to 19 year-olds, 20 to 24 year-olds and 25 to 29 year-olds. Demographic trends and participation rates in college and in university both vary widely across provinces. To reflect these differences, the analysis is presented at both a national level and for each of the ten provinces. At the national level, the sample size is large enough to allow analysis of trends in both full- and part-time enrolment at the national level; at the provincial level, we constrain our enquiry to full-time only. Demographic data on historical and projected population trends for each of the three age cohorts was provided by Demography Division, Statistics Canada, for the 1990 to 2031 period. Historical college and university participation rates were calculated as the ratio of enrolment to population for the three age cohorts as reported by the Labour Force Survey (LFS). We capture enrolments for the academic year through averaging enrolments over the eight-month period between September and April, for the academic years from 1990/1991 to 2005/2006. Because of the coverage of the LFS, the population considered is that of the ten provinces. Projections of possible future enrolment levels are provided based on three sets of assumptions or 'what if' scenarios: Scenario 1: Maintaining the status quo What if college and university participation rates remain at the average level over the 2003/2004 to 2005/2006 period? Scenario 2: Growth in line with historical trends What if national postsecondary participation rates were to maintain historical trends observed over the 1990/1991 to 2005/2006 period until 2016/2017, remaining constant thereafter? Scenario 3: Closing the gender gap What if, in future, male participation rates in postsecondary education matched the higher rates observed for females over the 2002/2003 to 2005/2006 period?

    Release date: 2007-11-21

  • Table: 97F0017X2001003
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001003.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001004
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001004.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 97F0017X2001005
    Description:

    This table is part of the topic "Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling," which presents data on school attendance and the highest level of schooling Canadians have attained, and data on certificates, degrees or diplomas they have been granted. These data can be used to track the educational qualifications of the labour force in general, and of specific groups such as women or immigrants. These data can also be used to measure the link between level of schooling and paid employment.

    "School attendance" refers to either full-time or part-time attendance at school, college or university during the nine-month period between September 2000 and May 2001. It is counted only for courses that could be used as credits towards a certificate, diploma or degree.

    This data table can be found in the Topic Bundle: Education in Canada: School Attendance and Levels of Schooling, 2001 Census, Catalogue No. 97F00017XCB2001000.

    It is also possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release bundles. Refer to Catalogue No. 97F0023XCB for more information.

    This table is available FREE on the Internet, Catalogue No. 97F0017XIE2001005.

    Release date: 2003-03-11

  • Table: 71-001-P
    Description:

    This publication provides the most current monthly labour market statistics. Each month, this publication contains a brief commentary highlighting recent developments in the Canadian labour market. It also includes a series of charts and tables on a variety of labour force characteristics, such as employment and unemployment for Canada, the provinces, metropolitan areas and economic regions.

    Release date: 2002-08-09

  • Table: 81-229-X
    Description:

    This publication is an annual review of statistics on Canadian education. It summarizes information on institutions, enrolment, graduates, teachers and finance for all levels of education and provides an analysis of the data. Ten-year time series are shown for most variables at the Canada level and five-year time series at the provincial level. The publication also provides demographic data from the census of Canada and educational attainment, labour force participation rates and unemployment rates of the adult population from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Table: 75-001-X19970033207
    Description:

    Is there a relationship between participation in adult education and unemployment? This article looks at trends in adult education from 1976 to 1996, and examines who goes back to school, according to age, sex, education already attained and family situation.

    Release date: 1997-09-10

  • Public use microdata: 89M0013X
    Description:

    This public use microdata file provides unaggregated data on the Aboriginal adult population - those who identify with their Aboriginal origin(s) and those who do not. For persons who identify, it contains almost 700 variables from the 1991 survey, such as, the group with which they identify, language proficiency, disability, chronic health conditions, schooling, work experience and the 1991 Census variables such as, income levels, marital status, fertility. The same census variables are provided for the population who does not identify.

    Release date: 1995-06-30
Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (0 to 10 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-004-M2018002
    Description:

    This article reports on recent labour market trends for full-time students aged 15 to 24 since the 2008-2009 recession. The analysis is based on data from Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2018-09-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000611405
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS) to draw a portrait of the changing make-up of international students enrolled in Canadian universities on either a part-time or full-time basis over the 1992 to 2008 period. This portrait shows how different international students are today compared to their counterparts in the early 1990s by examining changes that are evident in their university program levels and fields of study, age and gender composition, source countries and destinations within Canada.

    Release date: 2011-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610313160
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Every year the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) provides approximately $1.5 billion in loans and $80 million in grants to students with a demonstrated financial need. Nevertheless, a gap in postsecondary participation remains between children from upper- and lower-income backgrounds. While it is difficult to estimate the extent to which the CSLP has made it possible for low-income students to obtain a postsecondary education, the study looks at how well loans are targeted to low-income youth, the extent to which the loan amount reflects financial need, and the impact of parental income.

    Release date: 2006-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048040
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using cross-sectional data from the 2003 Canadian Community Health Survey, this study examines whether the number of hours worked by full-time students aged 15 to 17 is associated with smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. As well, longitudinal data from the National Population Health Survey were used to determine if work hours are related to the initiation of smoking and alcohol consumption, and to changes in physical activity over a two-year period.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-586-X19980015874
    Description:

    The purpose of this chapter is to present, for the first time, an overview of major trends in Canadian adult education and training. Data from a series of national adult education and training surveys have been brought together for analytical purposes for the first time.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-586-X
    Description:

    In today's emerging knowledge societies, the capacity of labour markets, firms and individuals to adjust to change, improve productivity and capitalize on technological innovation depends in large measure on the skills of the adult population. Improving the stock of skills available to the economy through investment in adult education and workplace learning has therefore become an issue of considerable strategic importance. But how are the Canadian markets for adult education and training evolving?

    This report presents, for the first time, evidence on the development of adult education and training in Canada during the last decade. Examined are not only broad trends in the demand and supply of adult education, but also the factors contributing to observed developments. Survey data collected in 1998 allow readers to gauge the current situation and make comparisons over time and across Canadian provinces. The findings indicate, first, that growth in adult education participation has slowed in recent years, and second, that there are major differences between the provinces in who gets trained, and how much.

    Release date: 2001-05-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 72F0020X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This research paper summarizes the approach, methodology and results of a study of the labour market behaviour of persons in various categories of attachment to the labour market. The analysis focuses on the transition probabilities for various categories of labour market attachment. Specifically, the study will include a discussion of the behavioural differences of the following groups:

    a) a comparison of transitions from U (unemployed), M (marginally attached - wants work) and N (not attached - does not want work); b) a further breakdown of the transitions from U by active searchers, passive searchers, those on temporary layoff and short-term future starts; c) a further breakdown of transitions for M by reason for not searching; and d) a further breakdown of transitions from N by long-term future starts and other.

    The study will be based on 1997-1999 Labour Force Survey data.

    Release date: 2000-01-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19980034471
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Earlier this decade, labour market conditions for young Canadians aged 15-24 deteriorated significantly. In the late 1980s, youths were more likely to be working than were adults. By 1997, only about half were employed, almost ten percentage points less than adults. Furthermore, when they did find work, youths today are more likely to be working part-time compared to adults and compared to yourths at the start of the decade, leading to reduced pay.

    Release date: 1999-03-31

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044417
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at the growing phenomenon of young adults continuing to live at home with their parents.

    Release date: 1999-03-11
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