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    • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

      The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

      Release date: 2013-12-20

    • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

      The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

      Release date: 2013-12-20

    • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

      Release date: 2012-11-23

    • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

      Release date: 2009-08-06

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

      Release date: 2008-05-22

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

      Release date: 2007-11-05

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

      Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

      Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

      Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

      Release date: 2005-12-05

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

      Release date: 2005-06-20

    • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037732
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article draws a basic profile of Internet use among Canadians of Aboriginal ancestry living off-reserve, using the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Then, with the 2000 General Social Survey on technology use, it asks whether a second digital divide exists between these users.

      Release date: 2004-12-07

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037425
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article explores Canadians' use of the Internet to research health-related or medical information. Using data from the Household Internet Use Survey, the article examines the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of household surfers who looked for health information on-line.

      Release date: 2004-10-29
    Data (6)

    Data (6) ((6 results))

    • Public use microdata: 56M0004X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

      The Household Component of the CIUS includes a short series of questions on the type of Internet connections and devices used by households to access the Internet from home, as well as availability of high speed service, and a standard module on household income. The questions may be answered by any knowledgeable member of the household. This content is supplemented by selected household characteristics and some geographic detail (i.e. province and region).

      Release date: 2013-12-20

    • Public use microdata: 56M0005X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) was redesigned in 2010 to better measure the type and speed of household Internet connections. It is a hybrid survey that measures both household Internet access and the individual online behaviours of a selected household member. It replaces the previous CIUS, a biennial survey conducted in 2005, 2007 and 2009. As the new survey has two distinct components - household and individual - with revised and streamlined questions, it is not appropriate to directly compare results from these two surveys in most cases.

      The Individual Component is administered in a similar fashion to the individual-level surveys conducted in prior years. Following the Household Component, an individual aged 16 years and older is randomly selected and asked about their use of the Internet, and online activities including electronic commerce. While the Household Component covers Internet access at home, the Individual Component covers uses of the Internet from any location. This content is supplemented by individual and household characteristics (e.g. age, household income, family type) and some geographical detail (e.g. province and region).

      Release date: 2013-12-20

    • Public use microdata: 56M0003X
      Description:

      The Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) measures the extent and scope to which individual Canadians use the Internet. Survey content includes the location of use (e.g., at home, at work), the frequency and intensity of use, the specific uses of the Internet from the home, the purchase of products and services (electronic commerce), and other issues related to Internet use (such as concerns over privacy). This content is supplemented by information on individual and household characteristics (e.g., age, income, education, family type) and some geographic detail (e.g. province, urban/rural, and Census Metropolitan Area).

      Release date: 2012-11-23

    • Table: 95F0301X
      Description:

      This product presents basic counts and totals for all 2001 Census of Agriculture farm variables, including number and type of farms; crop, horticulture and land use areas; land management practices; numbers of livestock and poultry; organic farming; computer use; farm machinery and equipment; farm capital; and farm operating expenses and receipts. It provides a comprehensive picture of the agriculture industry across Canada.These data from the initial release of the 2001 Census of Agriculture are available at the Canada, province, territory, census agricultural region (CAR) and census division (CD) levels.This product replaces the series of eight Agricultural Profile publications (one for Canada, one for the Atlantic Provinces, and one for each of the other six provinces) produced for the 1996 Census of Agriculture.

      Release date: 2002-05-15

    • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
      Geography: Province or territory
      Description:

      This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

      Release date: 2001-06-29

    • Table: 56-505-X
      Description:

      This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

      Release date: 2001-03-26
    Analysis (31)

    Analysis (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

    • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210910
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article looks at how Canadian seniors (those aged 65 and older) use the Internet compared with baby boomers (those aged 45 to 64 - the seniors of tomorrow). It examines the closing gap between Internet use rates of seniors and boomers, and describes differences in the types of online activities, as well as in the intensity of Internet use.

      Release date: 2009-08-06

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200800110597
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Internet use is a key hallmark of an information society. Assessing Internet use today goes beyond access to encompass a cluster of behaviours that reflect the individual's ability to participate productively in an information economy. This study compares the pattern of Internet use of Canadians working in the information and communications technology industries with that of other Canadians.

      Release date: 2008-05-22

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2007015
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      The 2005 Canadian Internet Use Survey (CIUS) included a module of questions on the extent and reasons for which Canadians use the Internet to connect with all levels of government - federal, provincial and municipal. This study examines the patterns of use for government online information and services among adult Canadians. A profile of government online users is developed in order to compare them with other Internet users and with non-users on the basis of various socio-demographic and Internet use characteristics. Concerns about Internet privacy and security are examined as potential barriers to the use of government online services. Finally, a multivariate logistic regression model helps to disentangle the various factors influencing the use of the Internet for government online activities.

      Release date: 2007-11-05

    • Articles and reports: 56F0004M2005012
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This paper investigates relationships between adult literacy skills and use of information and communications technologies (ICTs). Using the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey (ALL), it becomes possible to compare respondents' ICT use, based on self-assessed ICT use patterns and attitudes toward computers, with literacy skills and a number of socio-demographic characteristics, including age, gender and educational attainment. The paper offers data for Canada, its provinces and territories, as well as five other countries (Bermuda, the United States, Italy, Norway and Switzerland), allowing international and inter-provincial comparisons. An important objective of the paper is to examine outcomes associated with literacy skills in combination with patterns of ICT use, and this is achieved by profiling these characteristics and studying their relationships with respondent income. In addition, it offers a portrait of adults' computer and Internet use, including purposes of use, attitudes toward computers, and use of other ICTs, and analyzes such use, with a detailed focus on Canada.

      Patterns of Internet and computer access confirm the existence of "digital divides" both within and between nations. Apart from Italy, differences between the countries included in this study are not large. However, as found elsewhere, large divides exist within countries when examining respondents grouped by their level of income. In Canada, the Western provinces, the territories, and Ontario emerge as leaders in ICT use, although regional patterns are complex and vary depending on the specific technology examined.

      Many other factors are also strongly associated with respondents' ICT use. Age, gender, educational attainment, and level of literacy proficiency help predict whether a respondent is a "high-intensity" computer user. A significant decline in ICT use is found to occur after age 45 in all countries. The findings for ICT use by gender, however, were mixed. In the European countries included in this study (Italy, Norway and Switzerland), clear gender differences emerge but no such gap exists in North America. Respondents with less than upper-secondary education are significantly less likely to use computers for a range of purposes, and this pattern is most pronounced in Italy and Bermuda. In addition, scales that measure individuals' use of computers and the Internet, and attitudes toward computers, tend to increase with the literacy proficiency of respondents.

      Finally, literacy and computer use profiles are strongly related to the likelihood that respondents have high earnings. In most countries included in this study, adults who have average or higher literacy skills and who are intensive computer users have about three to six times the odds of being in the top quartile of personal income, compared to respondents with below average literacy skills and less intensive computer use.

      Release date: 2005-12-05

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

      Release date: 2005-06-20

    • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20040037732
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article draws a basic profile of Internet use among Canadians of Aboriginal ancestry living off-reserve, using the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Then, with the 2000 General Social Survey on technology use, it asks whether a second digital divide exists between these users.

      Release date: 2004-12-07

    • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037425
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article explores Canadians' use of the Internet to research health-related or medical information. Using data from the Household Internet Use Survey, the article examines the socio-economic and demographic characteristics of household surfers who looked for health information on-line.

      Release date: 2004-10-29

    • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016244
      Description:

      This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

      Over the past few years, Statistics New Zealand (SNZ) has experienced an increase in the volume of business survey data supplied by e-mail. However, up until now, SNZ has not had the business processes available to support electronic collection in a way that meets both the needs of SNZ and data suppliers. To this end, SNZ has invested a lot of effort over the last year in investigating how best to approach the problems and opportunities presented by electronic data collection. This paper outlines SNZ's plans to move the e-mail supplied data to a secure lodgement facility and the future development of an internet-based data collection system. It also presents a case study of the Monthly Retail Trade Survey data currently supplied by e-mail. This case study illustrates some of the benefits of electronic data, but also examines some of the costs to the organization and the data quality problems encountered. It also highlights the need to consider the data collection methodology within the wider context of the total survey cycle.

      Release date: 2002-09-12

    • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2001005
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      Information and communication technologies (ICTs) represent both a "problem" and an "opportunity" for rural Canadians. On the one hand, rural employment levels are diminished as more services are supplied to rural Canadians by ICTs - the ubiquitous ATMs (automatic teller machines) are one example. On the other hand, ICTs, and particularly the Internet, provide easier access for rural Canadians to target urban markets and provide urban consumers with easier access to rural goods and services.

      Release date: 2002-01-21

    • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010026043
      Geography: Canada
      Description:

      This article is a synopsis of an article published previously by the Science, Innovation, and Electronic Information Division, Statistics Canada. It highlights the sections that we believe are of most interest to readers from the culture sector drawing data from the 1999 Household Internet Use Survey (HIUS).

      Release date: 2001-12-19
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