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  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411339
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines trends in high school dropout rates over the 1990/1991 to 2009/2010 period. The high school dropout rate is defined as the share of 20 to 24 year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school. In addition, national data for both Aboriginal people and immigrants are now available from the Labour Force Survey, allowing researchers to assess how dropout rates differ between these groups and the rest of the population. Finally, the article also examines trends in labour market outcomes of dropouts in terms of unemployment rates and median weekly earnings.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411360
    Description:

    Differences across provinces in the 'typical' age at which students graduate from high school result in an apparent paradox: in some provinces, high school graduation rates and high school dropout rates both are low, while in others, both rates are high. This article addresses this apparent paradox, using data from the Labour Force Survey for 2009/2010. It examines high school status, by age group for 16 to 24 year olds, for Canada and the provinces, showing how the share of graduates, continuers and dropouts changes as students age.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    This report is a follow-up of a previous study of postsecondary participation (Shaienks and Gluszynski, 2007) which found that the overall postsecondary dropout rate was 15%. That rate however, differs across all types of institution and by demographic, family and school characteristics. This paper explores the impact of those characteristics on participation, graduation and dropping out of different types of postsecondary institution.

    Three new variables were developed to account for the type of institution attended by the student and the status in each of them. The university status, the college status and the other postsecondary status allow us to determine independently the outcome of participation in the different types of institution and profile graduates, continuers and especially drop outs according to their specific characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060039341
    Description:

    It's that time of year again - back-to-school for thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university. It's a busy and exciting time for parents as well as they stock up on school supplies, buy new clothing for their growing offspring and prepare for the start of another school year, teachers' meetings, homework and report cards.

    In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few facts relating to education, including the latest research findings on the very important role that parents play in their children's education, from setting expectations, to playing an active part in their children's learning, to spending on school supplies and extracurricular activities, to saving for the eventual costs of college or university.

    Facts and charts are provided for:Early childhood;School readiness;How common are French immersion programs?;How much homework do 15-year olds do?;Working while in school;Trends in high-school drop-out rates;What influences the decision to pursue a college or university education?;How many young people go on to postsecondary education?;Household savings and spending on education;The costs of attending college or university;Paying for postsecondary education;Government student loan debt;What is the first year of college or university like?Persistence in postsecondary education;University enrolment trends;What is education worth in the labour market?

    Release date: 2006-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006275
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study assesses the effects of literacy and numeracy skills on the labour market outcomes of Canadian high school drop-outs. We find that these skills have significant effects on the probability of being employed and on hours and weeks of work for both men and women, and also have strong (direct) influences on men's, but not women's, incomes. These findings imply that high school curricula that develop literacy and numeracy skills could provide significant returns even for those who do not complete their programs and wind up at the lower end of the labour market. Our findings similarly suggest that training programs catering to drop-outs could substantially improve these individuals' labour market outcomes by developing these basic skills. The results also have implications for dual labour market theory, since it is often assumed that the secondary market is characterized by minimal returns to human capital'contrary to what is found here.

    Release date: 2006-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050048984
    Description:

    This article uses Labour Force Survey data for the 1990-1991 to 2004-2005 school years to examine trends in the high school drop-out rate for Canada and the provinces, for males compared to and females and for census metropolitan areas compared to rural areas. A high school drop-out is defined as the share of 20-to-24-year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-589-X
    Description:

    The report Children and youth at risk documents the proceedings of a symposium held in Ottawa on April 6 and 7, 2000 to explore research and policy issues concerning the education of children who, for whatever reason, are at risk of not meeting the normal expectations of the education system.

    It includes summaries of presentations, discussions and commissioned research papers. The themes and issues are summarized in a synthesis written by Dr. Robert Crocker of the faculty of education at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    The symposium was held as an activity of the Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda. The Canadian Education Statistics Council - a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada - started this research program with a view to promoting research on policy issues in education of concern to researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. Human Resources Development Canada provided financial support for the symposium.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22
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Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411339
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this article examines trends in high school dropout rates over the 1990/1991 to 2009/2010 period. The high school dropout rate is defined as the share of 20 to 24 year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school. In addition, national data for both Aboriginal people and immigrants are now available from the Labour Force Survey, allowing researchers to assess how dropout rates differ between these groups and the rest of the population. Finally, the article also examines trends in labour market outcomes of dropouts in terms of unemployment rates and median weekly earnings.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201000411360
    Description:

    Differences across provinces in the 'typical' age at which students graduate from high school result in an apparent paradox: in some provinces, high school graduation rates and high school dropout rates both are low, while in others, both rates are high. This article addresses this apparent paradox, using data from the Labour Force Survey for 2009/2010. It examines high school status, by age group for 16 to 24 year olds, for Canada and the provinces, showing how the share of graduates, continuers and dropouts changes as students age.

    Release date: 2010-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    This report is a follow-up of a previous study of postsecondary participation (Shaienks and Gluszynski, 2007) which found that the overall postsecondary dropout rate was 15%. That rate however, differs across all types of institution and by demographic, family and school characteristics. This paper explores the impact of those characteristics on participation, graduation and dropping out of different types of postsecondary institution.

    Three new variables were developed to account for the type of institution attended by the student and the status in each of them. The university status, the college status and the other postsecondary status allow us to determine independently the outcome of participation in the different types of institution and profile graduates, continuers and especially drop outs according to their specific characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060039341
    Description:

    It's that time of year again - back-to-school for thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university. It's a busy and exciting time for parents as well as they stock up on school supplies, buy new clothing for their growing offspring and prepare for the start of another school year, teachers' meetings, homework and report cards.

    In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few facts relating to education, including the latest research findings on the very important role that parents play in their children's education, from setting expectations, to playing an active part in their children's learning, to spending on school supplies and extracurricular activities, to saving for the eventual costs of college or university.

    Facts and charts are provided for:Early childhood;School readiness;How common are French immersion programs?;How much homework do 15-year olds do?;Working while in school;Trends in high-school drop-out rates;What influences the decision to pursue a college or university education?;How many young people go on to postsecondary education?;Household savings and spending on education;The costs of attending college or university;Paying for postsecondary education;Government student loan debt;What is the first year of college or university like?Persistence in postsecondary education;University enrolment trends;What is education worth in the labour market?

    Release date: 2006-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006275
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study assesses the effects of literacy and numeracy skills on the labour market outcomes of Canadian high school drop-outs. We find that these skills have significant effects on the probability of being employed and on hours and weeks of work for both men and women, and also have strong (direct) influences on men's, but not women's, incomes. These findings imply that high school curricula that develop literacy and numeracy skills could provide significant returns even for those who do not complete their programs and wind up at the lower end of the labour market. Our findings similarly suggest that training programs catering to drop-outs could substantially improve these individuals' labour market outcomes by developing these basic skills. The results also have implications for dual labour market theory, since it is often assumed that the secondary market is characterized by minimal returns to human capital'contrary to what is found here.

    Release date: 2006-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20050048984
    Description:

    This article uses Labour Force Survey data for the 1990-1991 to 2004-2005 school years to examine trends in the high school drop-out rate for Canada and the provinces, for males compared to and females and for census metropolitan areas compared to rural areas. A high school drop-out is defined as the share of 20-to-24-year-olds who are not attending school and who have not graduated from high school.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-591-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report provides a descriptive overview of the first results from the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 18-20-year-olds in Canada. The YITS, developed through a partnership between Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a longitudinal survey designed to collect a broad range of information on the education and labour market experiences of youth.

    This report provides new information on high school dropout rates as of December 1999 and compares high school graduates and dropouts on a number of dimensions, including family background, parental education and occupation, engagement with school, working during high school, peer influence, and educational aspirations. This report also provides a first look at pathways followed by young people once they are no longer in high school, including their participation in post-secondary education, employment status, self-assessed skills levels, and barriers to post-secondary education.

    Release date: 2002-01-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-589-X
    Description:

    The report Children and youth at risk documents the proceedings of a symposium held in Ottawa on April 6 and 7, 2000 to explore research and policy issues concerning the education of children who, for whatever reason, are at risk of not meeting the normal expectations of the education system.

    It includes summaries of presentations, discussions and commissioned research papers. The themes and issues are summarized in a synthesis written by Dr. Robert Crocker of the faculty of education at Memorial University of Newfoundland.

    The symposium was held as an activity of the Pan-Canadian Education Research Agenda. The Canadian Education Statistics Council - a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada - started this research program with a view to promoting research on policy issues in education of concern to researchers, policy-makers and practitioners. Human Resources Development Canada provided financial support for the symposium.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-589-X20010015848
    Description:

    The authors began by noting that the concept of the "adolescent mother" encompasses a multitude of factors and indicators, which include the rates of fertility (birth rates) and pregnancy.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-589-X20010015850
    Description:

    This attempt at a synthesis will centre around three questions: "What do we know about children and youth at risk?" "What do we need to know?" and "What are the major policy issues surrounding this area that might be informed by research?"

    Release date: 2001-05-22
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