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All (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 22-20-0001
    Description: Digital Insights brings together a variety of data from across Statistics Canada and other sources to provide insights and analysis on the digital economy and society in Canada. The topics covered include: e-commerce, digital trade, cyber security and cybercrime, and the impacts of Internet and other technology use on the Canadian economy and society.
    Release date: 2024-05-21

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001202200100004
    Description: International Women’s Day (IWD), March 8, 2023, is an opportunity to highlight the status of progress made towards achieving gender equality, as well as celebrate women’s and girls’ social, economic, cultural, and political contributions and achievements. Using data from a number of Statistics Canada publications, this article highlights diverse groups of women’s access to and use of the Internet, as well as their representation in certain fields of study and occupations related to digital technologies.
    Release date: 2023-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2022001
    Description:

    Monitoring traffic in large urban areas remains a challenge for both practical and technical reasons. This paper presents a computer vision-based system to periodically extract vehicle counts from Canadian traffic camera imagery.

    Release date: 2022-09-06

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100033
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, computer technology has gradually changed workplaces, leading to a reduction of routine and manual job tasks, and an increase in non-routine, cognitive tasks. More recent developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning could be even more far-reaching, as they are designed to execute tasks that were traditionally considered non-automatable.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020011
    Description:

    The recent development of several artificial intelligence applications—such as driverless vehicles, robo-writers and computer-aided medical diagnostics—has led to concerns about the role of human workers in the future workforce. The COVID-19 pandemic has added to these concerns, as businesses may turn to new artificial intelligence technologies to perform work activities not traditionally regarded as automatable, such as social tasks. While previous studies have estimated the share of Canadian workers at high risk of automation-related job transformation, this study is the first to examine in great detail the automation risks faced by different groups of workers.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800510678
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2008-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210323
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although nanotechnology can be thought of as a sector of its own, it is clear that nanotechnology is a cross-sector phenomenon with potentially significant impacts. Nanotechnologies can be found in areas as diverse as biotechnology and health, agriculture, electronics and computer technology, environment and energy, optics, and in materials and manufacturing.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20040097861
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2002 survey of industrial R&D activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported and this is explained in the note on Methodology on page 9. The 2002 survey conducted in 2003 collects data on actual R&D spending in 2002, on preliminary figures for 2003, and on spending intentions for 2004.

    Release date: 2004-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0014X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description: This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 14 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 14 is the first cycle to collect detailed information on access to and use of information communication technology in Canada. Topics include general use of technology and computers, technology in the workplace, development of computer skills, frequency of Internet and E-mail use, non-users and security and information on the Internet. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.
    Release date: 2001-06-29
Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (0 to 10 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 22-20-0001
    Description: Digital Insights brings together a variety of data from across Statistics Canada and other sources to provide insights and analysis on the digital economy and society in Canada. The topics covered include: e-commerce, digital trade, cyber security and cybercrime, and the impacts of Internet and other technology use on the Canadian economy and society.
    Release date: 2024-05-21

  • Stats in brief: 89-28-0001202200100004
    Description: International Women’s Day (IWD), March 8, 2023, is an opportunity to highlight the status of progress made towards achieving gender equality, as well as celebrate women’s and girls’ social, economic, cultural, and political contributions and achievements. Using data from a number of Statistics Canada publications, this article highlights diverse groups of women’s access to and use of the Internet, as well as their representation in certain fields of study and occupations related to digital technologies.
    Release date: 2023-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 18-001-X2022001
    Description:

    Monitoring traffic in large urban areas remains a challenge for both practical and technical reasons. This paper presents a computer vision-based system to periodically extract vehicle counts from Canadian traffic camera imagery.

    Release date: 2022-09-06

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100033
    Description:

    Over the past few decades, computer technology has gradually changed workplaces, leading to a reduction of routine and manual job tasks, and an increase in non-routine, cognitive tasks. More recent developments in artificial intelligence and machine learning could be even more far-reaching, as they are designed to execute tasks that were traditionally considered non-automatable.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020011
    Description:

    The recent development of several artificial intelligence applications—such as driverless vehicles, robo-writers and computer-aided medical diagnostics—has led to concerns about the role of human workers in the future workforce. The COVID-19 pandemic has added to these concerns, as businesses may turn to new artificial intelligence technologies to perform work activities not traditionally regarded as automatable, such as social tasks. While previous studies have estimated the share of Canadian workers at high risk of automation-related job transformation, this study is the first to examine in great detail the automation risks faced by different groups of workers.

    Release date: 2020-06-29

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800510678
    Description:

    This service bulletin contains historical and current data on research and development (R&D) expenditures and personnel in Canada, by industry. In Canada, the industrial or business enterprise sector is the largest R&D performer.

    Release date: 2008-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210323
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although nanotechnology can be thought of as a sector of its own, it is clear that nanotechnology is a cross-sector phenomenon with potentially significant impacts. Nanotechnologies can be found in areas as diverse as biotechnology and health, agriculture, electronics and computer technology, environment and energy, optics, and in materials and manufacturing.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2005006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The growth in micro-technologies and their widespread diffusion across economic sectors have given rise to what is often described as a New Economy - an economy in which competitive prospects are closely aligned with the firm's innovation and technology practices, and its use of skilled workers. Training is one strategy that many firms undertake in order to improve the quality of their workforce.

    This study contributes to the expanding body of research in the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Using data on business sector workplaces from the 1999 Workplace and Employee Survey (WES), we investigate factors related to the incidence and intensity of training. The study focuses on whether training incidence and training intensity are more closely associated with the technological competencies of specific workplaces than with membership in ICT and science-based industry environments. The study finds that training incidence depends more on the technological competencies exhibited by individual workplaces. Among workplaces that decide to train, these technological competencies are also important determinants of the intensity of training.

    Workplaces which score highly on our index of technological competency are over three times more likely to train than those that rank zero on the competency index. The size of the workplace is also a factor. Large and medium-sized workplaces are 3 and 2.3 times more likely to train than small workplaces, respectively. And workplaces with higher-skilled workforces are more likely to train than workplaces with lower-skilled workforces.

    For workplaces that choose to train, their technological competency is the main determinant of training intensity. The size of the workplace, the average cost of training, and the skill level of the workforce are also influential factors'but to a lesser extent. Other factors, such as sector, outside sources of funding, and unionization status, are not influential factors in determining the intensity of training. Workplaces that have a higher average cost of training train fewer employees as a proportion of their workforce. However, the skill level of their employees moderates this effect, because as payroll-per-employee increases (a proxy for worker skills), plants train more.

    Release date: 2005-01-25

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X20040097861
    Description:

    The statistics in this bulletin are derived from the 2002 survey of industrial R&D activities in Canada, which covers firms spending a million dollars or more on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada, and from the administrative data of the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency (CCRA) for firms which spend less than a million dollars on the performance or funding of R&D in Canada. The use of CCRA data results in a small understatement in total figures for the most recent years reported and this is explained in the note on Methodology on page 9. The 2002 survey conducted in 2003 collects data on actual R&D spending in 2002, on preliminary figures for 2003, and on spending intentions for 2004.

    Release date: 2004-08-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-601-M2003065
    Description:

    This paper investigates the key characteristics of the farm operators and farm businesses that influence computer use.

    Release date: 2003-12-17
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