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  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2015006
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study takes a first look at school mobility among off-reserve First Nations students in grades 1 to 6 and grades 7 to 12. The reason off-reserve First Nations students last moved schools is examined, and comparisons are made between students in grades 1 to 6 and those in grades 7 to 12. Based on the number of schools that a student had attended and the reason provided for the last school move, comparisons are made between off-reserve First Nations students who were non-movers and movers. Three levels of socio-economic characteristics are examined for off-reserve First Nations students including: student characteristics (for example, age, sex, and registered Indian status); family characteristics (for example, income, living arrangements and parental education); and school support characteristics (for example, parental involvement in education) to show differences between non-movers and movers. Finally, school outcomes (for example, grade on last report card, happiness at school, ever repeated a grade) are compared between non-movers and movers to determine if having one “non-regular” progression school move is negatively related to academic success for off-reserve First Nations students.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-590-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    Information gathered through PISA enables a thorough comparative analysis of the skill level of students near the end of their compulsory education. PISA also permits exploration of the ways that skills vary across different social and economic groups and the factors that influence the level and distribution of skills within and between countries.

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In Canada, PISA is administered through a partnership of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    PISA will be repeated every three years. The first PISA cycle was conducted in 2000 and focused on reading, with mathematics and science as minor domains. The focus shifts to mathematics in PISA 2003, to science in 2006, and back to reading in 2009.

    These reports provide results of the PISA assessments of student performance at the provincial level, and compare the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Table: 89-637-X2009002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the First Nations analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for off-reserve First Nations children aged 6 to 14 for major themes covered in the analytical article: school achievement; parental satisfaction toward school practices; getting along with teachers; learning disability; frequency of reading books; and frequency of playing sports.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights initial findings from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey regarding the school experiences of First Nations children aged 6 to 14 who are living off reserve. The goal of this report is to provide a descriptive portrait of the early school experiences among First Nations children, as well as to gain an understanding of some of the contextual factors likely to be associated with their school achievement. To meet this end a number of factors are explored, including school experiences, socio-demographic characteristics, activity limitations and medical conditions, and out-of-school activities.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Stats in brief: 89-637-X2009003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and 2006 Census. This fact sheet provides information on the school experiences among First Nations children aged 6 to 14 who are living off reserve, as well as some of the contextual factors which were found to be associated with their school achievement, as perceived and reported by parents who responded on behalf of their child in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) in 2006.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

  • Table: 81-582-X
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) draws from a wide variety of data sources to provide information on the school-age population, elementary, secondary and postsecondary education, transitions, and labour market outcomes.

    PCEIP products include tables, fact sheets, reports and a methodological handbook. They present indicators for all of Canada, the provinces, the territories, as well as selected international comparisons and comparisons over time.

    The Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP) is an ongoing initiative of the Canadian Education Statistics Council, a partnership between Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada that provides a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada.

    Release date: 2019-09-18

  • Table: 89-637-X2009002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the First Nations analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for off-reserve First Nations children aged 6 to 14 for major themes covered in the analytical article: school achievement; parental satisfaction toward school practices; getting along with teachers; learning disability; frequency of reading books; and frequency of playing sports.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Table: 89-634-X2008005
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: 81-590-X2004001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is a collaborative effort among member countries of the OECD, designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    This report provides results from the PISA 2003 assessment of student performance in mathematics, reading, science and problem solving at the provincial level, and compares the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally. PISA 2003 has a special focus on mathematical literacy.

    Forty-one countries participated in PISA 2003, including all 30 OECD countries and 11 non-OECD countries. About 28,000 15-year-olds from more than 1,000 schools took part in Canada.

    Release date: 2004-12-20

  • Table: 81-229-X
    Description:

    This publication is an annual review of statistics on Canadian education. It summarizes information on institutions, enrolment, graduates, teachers and finance for all levels of education and provides an analysis of the data. Ten-year time series are shown for most variables at the Canada level and five-year time series at the provincial level. The publication also provides demographic data from the census of Canada and educational attainment, labour force participation rates and unemployment rates of the adult population from the Labour Force Survey.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Table: 64-203-X
    Description:

    This annual publication includes detailed analysis and charts depicting construction activity over the last decade. The tables are comparable to those in the monthly publication 64-001-XPB Building permits. In addition, the annual publication includes revised monthly data, on a seasonally adjusted basis, for the previous three years.

    Release date: 1998-03-30

  • Public use microdata: 89M0013X
    Description:

    This public use microdata file provides unaggregated data on the Aboriginal adult population - those who identify with their Aboriginal origin(s) and those who do not. For persons who identify, it contains almost 700 variables from the 1991 survey, such as, the group with which they identify, language proficiency, disability, chronic health conditions, schooling, work experience and the 1991 Census variables such as, income levels, marital status, fertility. The same census variables are provided for the population who does not identify.

    Release date: 1995-06-30
Analysis (49)

Analysis (49) (0 to 10 of 49 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114680
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: The Girl Child" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of girls aged 17 and under. The chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada and presents several topics related to their well-being including: living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, physical health and development, mortality, emotional and social health and development, child care, school readiness, education, and personal security. Where possible, comparisons are made between girls in different age groups, between girls and boys, and within several subpopulations.

    Release date: 2017-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2015006
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study takes a first look at school mobility among off-reserve First Nations students in grades 1 to 6 and grades 7 to 12. The reason off-reserve First Nations students last moved schools is examined, and comparisons are made between students in grades 1 to 6 and those in grades 7 to 12. Based on the number of schools that a student had attended and the reason provided for the last school move, comparisons are made between off-reserve First Nations students who were non-movers and movers. Three levels of socio-economic characteristics are examined for off-reserve First Nations students including: student characteristics (for example, age, sex, and registered Indian status); family characteristics (for example, income, living arrangements and parental education); and school support characteristics (for example, parental involvement in education) to show differences between non-movers and movers. Finally, school outcomes (for example, grade on last report card, happiness at school, ever repeated a grade) are compared between non-movers and movers to determine if having one “non-regular” progression school move is negatively related to academic success for off-reserve First Nations students.

    Release date: 2015-03-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-590-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) is designed to assess, on a regular basis, the achievement of 15-year-olds in reading, mathematical and scientific literacy through a common international test.

    Information gathered through PISA enables a thorough comparative analysis of the skill level of students near the end of their compulsory education. PISA also permits exploration of the ways that skills vary across different social and economic groups and the factors that influence the level and distribution of skills within and between countries.

    PISA is a collaborative effort among member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). In Canada, PISA is administered through a partnership of the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada, Human Resources and Skills Development Canada and Statistics Canada.

    PISA will be repeated every three years. The first PISA cycle was conducted in 2000 and focused on reading, with mathematics and science as minor domains. The focus shifts to mathematics in PISA 2003, to science in 2006, and back to reading in 2009.

    These reports provide results of the PISA assessments of student performance at the provincial level, and compare the achievement of Canadian students to that of students internationally.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009001
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article highlights initial findings from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey regarding the school experiences of First Nations children aged 6 to 14 who are living off reserve. The goal of this report is to provide a descriptive portrait of the early school experiences among First Nations children, as well as to gain an understanding of some of the contextual factors likely to be associated with their school achievement. To meet this end a number of factors are explored, including school experiences, socio-demographic characteristics, activity limitations and medical conditions, and out-of-school activities.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Stats in brief: 89-637-X2009003
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and 2006 Census. This fact sheet provides information on the school experiences among First Nations children aged 6 to 14 who are living off reserve, as well as some of the contextual factors which were found to be associated with their school achievement, as perceived and reported by parents who responded on behalf of their child in the Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) in 2006.

    Release date: 2009-01-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20070019630
    Description:

    Activities in a child's home environment, such as daily reading, high positive parent child interaction, participation in organized sports, as well as lessons in physical activities and the arts are associated with a child's readiness to learn in school at age 5. According to a recent study, children in lower-income households were less likely to have exposure to these activities -- however, those who did were more ready to learn than those who did not. The analysis draws on data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to describe the readiness to learn at school of Canadian children who were 5 years old in 2002-2003.

    Release date: 2007-05-01
Reference (2)

Reference (2) ((2 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-522-X20010016308
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    The Census Bureau uses response error analysis to evaluate the effectiveness of survey questions. For a given survey, questions that are deemed critical to the survey or considered problematic from past examination are selected for analysis. New or revised questions are prime candidates for re-interview. Re-interview is a new interview where a subset of questions from the original interview are re-asked to a sample of the survey respondents. For each re-interview question, the proportion of respondents who give inconsistent responses is evaluated. The "Index of Inconsistency" is used as the measure of response variance. Each question is labelled low, moderate, or high in response variance. In high response variance cases, the questions are put through cognitive testing, and modifications to the question are recommended.

    The Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) sponsored by The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), is also investigated for response error analysis and the possible relationships between inconsistent responses and characteristics of the schools and teachers in that survey. Results of this analysis can be used to change survey procedures and improve data quality.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Notices and consultations: 11-522-X19980015010
    Description:

    In 1994, Statistics Canada introduced a new longitudinal social survey that collects information from about 23,000 children spread over 13,500 households. The objective of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth is to measure the development and well being of children until they reach adulthood. To this end, the survey gathers together information about the child, parents, neighbourhood as well as family and school environment. As a consequence, the data collected for each child, is provided by several respondents, from parents to teachers, a situation which contributes to an increased disclosure risk. In order to reach a balance between confidentiality and the analytical value of released data, the survey produces three different microdata files with more or less information. The master file that contains all the information is only available by means of remote access. Hence, researchers do not have direct access to the data, but send their request in the form of software programs that are submitted by Statistics Canada staff. The results are then vetted for confidentiality and sent back to the researchers. The presentation will be devoted to the various disclosure risks of such a survey and to the tools used to reduce those risks.

    Release date: 1999-10-22
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