Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (19)

All (19) (0 to 10 of 19 results)

  • Data Visualization: 14-20-00012019001
    Description:

    This interactive visualization application provides a comprehensive picture of the Canadian labour market using the most recent data from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH). The estimates are seasonally adjusted and available by province and largest industrial sector. Historical estimates, going back 10 years, are also included. The interactive application allows users to quickly and easily explore and personalize the information presented. Combine multiple provinces and industrial sectors to create your own labour market domains of interest.

    Release date: 2021-05-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-203-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. It also provides information on products and services, as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2021-03-30

  • Table: 72-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours. The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series. The program provides data for over 200 industries on the total number of paid employees, earnings and hours for Canada, provinces and territories. The estimates are presented as weekly estimates and annual averages are also compiled.

    Release date: 2013-01-15

  • Table: 22-202-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of the Canadian greenhouse industry. Included are annual estimates of the total area under glass and plastic, months of operation and the total sales. Estimates of employment, labour costs, investments, purchases of plant materials and heating fuel costs are also available. Information on the value of sales of greenhouse vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants are published, as well as the production of flowers by variety. Also included are estimates on the area, cost of purchases, employment and value of nursery stock and sod. Finally, there is information on the proportion of sales through various channels.

    Release date: 2012-05-03

  • Table: 68-213-S
    Description:

    This publication presents detailed statistical tables, graphs and documentation supporting the public sector employment and finance data released in The Daily.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0026M2005005
    Description:

    The aim of this paper is to describe the actual methodology used to estimate annual hours worked by industry and province in Canada in view to be consistent with the System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2005-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016256
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    From a survey of employer payroll/tax filing practices, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) determined that some businesses prepare their own tax reports using payroll/tax software developed internally or purchased, while others arrange contracts with third parties for this type of service. Subsequently, the BLS developed an electronic data collection strategy for the quarterly Multiple Worksite Report (MWR), which is filed by 112,000 legal entities representing 1.2 million worksites.

    Recently, the BLS has been working closely with payroll/tax software developers and with firms providing payroll/tax filing services in order to include the electronic transmittal of MWR data into their systems. In the past, employers with multiple establishments in different states had to manually file paper MWRs for each state. With electronic reporting, data for all states are sent directly to the BLS, where the data is edited and then forwarded on to the proper state.

    This paper discusses the background information noted above, as well as the various approaches that the BLS staff has used to solicit the co-operation of these firms in modifying their systems to include electronic reporting as an option or additional service.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001149
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper extends earlier work by updating the structure and policy parameters of payroll taxes in Canada. Drawing from a newly available dataset, it also reports trends on the level, growth and role of each component of these taxes in recent years. Finally, it compares Canadian payroll taxes to those of the world's leading developed countries. The following highlights the main findings.

    Payroll taxes in Canada have grown considerably since the early 1980s, constituting an increasingly important source of revenues for both the federal and provincial governments. However, the rapid expansion observed in earlier years has in large part slowed down in the early 1990s. Payroll tax revenues collected from employees and employers in the country have stabilized at around 5.7% of GDP or 14.0% of total federal and provincial government revenues since 1992; the effective total payroll tax rate has levelled off at around $12.20 for every $100 of wages and salaries since 1994.

    The structure, level, growth, and role of each component of payroll taxes vary considerably from one province to another. Yet, EI premiums have remarkably been the largest component of these taxes in every province in both the 1980s and the 1990s, regardless of whether there are provincial payroll taxes; rising EI premiums have also consistently been the leading contributor to the expansion of total payroll taxes during this period.

    Despite rapid growth in the 1980s and early 1990s, Canadian payroll taxes remain one of the lowest in the world's major developed economies. According to data compiled by the OECD, total payroll tax revenues in Canada amounted to 6.0% of GDP in 1996 --- that is 14% lower than that of the United States (at 7.0% of GDP); the lowest in the G7 nations; and the 9th lowest among the 29 OECD member states.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the results of an investigation into three aspects of the low income cut-offs: the behaviour of a proposed 'annually updated' low income series, the addition of payroll taxes, and the restructuring of the matrix of 35 cut-offs.

    Release date: 2001-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010015610
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of changes between 1980 and 1997 in various taxes in the G-7 and OECD countries.

    Release date: 2001-03-23
Data (5)

Data (5) ((5 results))

  • Data Visualization: 14-20-00012019001
    Description:

    This interactive visualization application provides a comprehensive picture of the Canadian labour market using the most recent data from the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours (SEPH). The estimates are seasonally adjusted and available by province and largest industrial sector. Historical estimates, going back 10 years, are also included. The interactive application allows users to quickly and easily explore and personalize the information presented. Combine multiple provinces and industrial sectors to create your own labour market domains of interest.

    Release date: 2021-05-27

  • Table: 72-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents a timely picture of employment, earnings and hours. The tabulations focus on monthly labour market information and some historical data series. The program provides data for over 200 industries on the total number of paid employees, earnings and hours for Canada, provinces and territories. The estimates are presented as weekly estimates and annual averages are also compiled.

    Release date: 2013-01-15

  • Table: 22-202-X
    Description:

    This product provides an overview of the Canadian greenhouse industry. Included are annual estimates of the total area under glass and plastic, months of operation and the total sales. Estimates of employment, labour costs, investments, purchases of plant materials and heating fuel costs are also available. Information on the value of sales of greenhouse vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants are published, as well as the production of flowers by variety. Also included are estimates on the area, cost of purchases, employment and value of nursery stock and sod. Finally, there is information on the proportion of sales through various channels.

    Release date: 2012-05-03

  • Table: 68-213-S
    Description:

    This publication presents detailed statistical tables, graphs and documentation supporting the public sector employment and finance data released in The Daily.

    Release date: 2006-06-15

  • Table: 68-513-X19970013564
    Description:

    Canada's workers' compensation systems are financed through a payroll tax with the cost initially falling on employers. The rates that employers pay are supposed to reflect the costs of current and future medical and vocational rehabilitation, and financial compensation associated with workplace injuries, as well as the costs of administering the system.

    Release date: 1998-02-04
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20010016256
    Description:

    This paper discusses in detail issues dealing with the technical aspects of designing and conducting surveys. It is intended for an audience of survey methodologists.

    From a survey of employer payroll/tax filing practices, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) determined that some businesses prepare their own tax reports using payroll/tax software developed internally or purchased, while others arrange contracts with third parties for this type of service. Subsequently, the BLS developed an electronic data collection strategy for the quarterly Multiple Worksite Report (MWR), which is filed by 112,000 legal entities representing 1.2 million worksites.

    Recently, the BLS has been working closely with payroll/tax software developers and with firms providing payroll/tax filing services in order to include the electronic transmittal of MWR data into their systems. In the past, employers with multiple establishments in different states had to manually file paper MWRs for each state. With electronic reporting, data for all states are sent directly to the BLS, where the data is edited and then forwarded on to the proper state.

    This paper discusses the background information noted above, as well as the various approaches that the BLS staff has used to solicit the co-operation of these firms in modifying their systems to include electronic reporting as an option or additional service.

    Release date: 2002-09-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001149
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper extends earlier work by updating the structure and policy parameters of payroll taxes in Canada. Drawing from a newly available dataset, it also reports trends on the level, growth and role of each component of these taxes in recent years. Finally, it compares Canadian payroll taxes to those of the world's leading developed countries. The following highlights the main findings.

    Payroll taxes in Canada have grown considerably since the early 1980s, constituting an increasingly important source of revenues for both the federal and provincial governments. However, the rapid expansion observed in earlier years has in large part slowed down in the early 1990s. Payroll tax revenues collected from employees and employers in the country have stabilized at around 5.7% of GDP or 14.0% of total federal and provincial government revenues since 1992; the effective total payroll tax rate has levelled off at around $12.20 for every $100 of wages and salaries since 1994.

    The structure, level, growth, and role of each component of payroll taxes vary considerably from one province to another. Yet, EI premiums have remarkably been the largest component of these taxes in every province in both the 1980s and the 1990s, regardless of whether there are provincial payroll taxes; rising EI premiums have also consistently been the leading contributor to the expansion of total payroll taxes during this period.

    Despite rapid growth in the 1980s and early 1990s, Canadian payroll taxes remain one of the lowest in the world's major developed economies. According to data compiled by the OECD, total payroll tax revenues in Canada amounted to 6.0% of GDP in 1996 --- that is 14% lower than that of the United States (at 7.0% of GDP); the lowest in the G7 nations; and the 9th lowest among the 29 OECD member states.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2001003
    Description:

    This paper outlines the results of an investigation into three aspects of the low income cut-offs: the behaviour of a proposed 'annually updated' low income series, the addition of payroll taxes, and the restructuring of the matrix of 35 cut-offs.

    Release date: 2001-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20010015610
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article provides an overview of changes between 1980 and 1997 in various taxes in the G-7 and OECD countries.

    Release date: 2001-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000035373
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Payroll taxes vary widely in level and growth across the provinces. Of the nine taxes, only three are nationwide. This article looks at trends across the country. It also briefly compares total Canadian payroll taxes with those of other G-7 and OECD nations.

    Release date: 2000-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20000025070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Payroll taxes have grown substantially since the early 1980s, and have become an increasingly important source of government revenues. This article, part one of a two-part analysis, details the various payroll taxes collected by the federal and provincial governments. A subsequent article will report on national and provincial trends in the level, growth and role of each component and compare Canadian payroll taxes to those of the other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2000-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996093
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. The first part of this paper addresses various measurement issues raised in the recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set thatencompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of job creation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both theentire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of net and gross employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matterwhich method of sizing firms is used. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is verysensitive to the measurement approaches used. Part one of the paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, and examines employment growth inexisting small and large firms (i.e., excluding births). It is found that employment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar. Finallyattempts are made to introduce a job quality aspect to the numbers by using payroll distributions rather than employment. The net and gross rates of increase anddecrease in payrolls by firm size are found to be only marginally different than those of employment. The second part of the paper looks at concentration of employment creation and destruction within size classes. This is relevant because if growth is highlyconcentrated, knowing that a firm is small will provide little information about its prospects for growth. Most small firms would grow relatively little, or decline, whilea few expanded a lot. It is found that both job creation and destruction is highly concentrated among relatively few firms in all size groups, but it is greater amongsmall and mid-sized companies than large. Finally attempts are made to correlate the performance of businesses over two three-year periods. It is found thatknowing that a firm is a high performer (in terms of jobs created) over one period is of only limited value in determining growth in the second period. This isparticularly true among small firms. These results suggest that firms which expand rapidly during one period are replaced to some considerable degree by others inthe subsequent period.

    Release date: 1997-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1996090
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper outlines the structure of payroll taxes and documents evidence on the level, growth and role of each component over the last three decades for Canada and for each province. Levied by both the federal and provincial governments, payroll taxes in Canada include four major components: i) unemployment insurance (UI) premiums; ii) Canada/Quebec Pension Plan (C/QPP) contributions; iii) workers compensation (WC) premiums; and iv) the provincial health/post-secondary education (H/E) tax levied by Quebec, Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland. While the UI and C/QPP components are levied on both employers and employees, the WC and H/E components are levied on employers only. Our main findings are 1) payroll taxes have increased substantially over the last three decades in Canada as a whole and in every province; 2) the structure, level, growth and role of each component of payroll taxes vary remarkably from one province to another; 3) the expansion of the UI component in recent years has been the largest contributor to the rise in payroll taxes across every province in the country; and 4) despite significant growth in recent years, payroll taxes are still much lower in Canada than in most other western industrialized countries.

    Release date: 1996-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031641
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1994, for the first time in four years, employers expanded their workforces significantly. A look at recent changes in paid employment, earnings and hours across detailed industries.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199300420
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Changing economic conditions affect some industries more than others.

    Release date: 1993-12-07
Reference (4)

Reference (4) ((4 results))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 72-203-G
    Description:

    The Guide to the Survey of Employment, Payrolls and Hours contains a dictionary of concepts and definitions and covers topics such as survey methodology, data collection and processing, and data quality. It also provides information on products and services, as well as the survey questionnaire.

    Release date: 2021-03-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11F0026M2005005
    Description:

    The aim of this paper is to describe the actual methodology used to estimate annual hours worked by industry and province in Canada in view to be consistent with the System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2005-08-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 75F0010X
    Description:

    The publication guides the user through the vast array of labour market and income data sources. It offers detailed descriptions of the various surveys, including the data collected. A summary chart gives snapshot information for comparisons.

    Release date: 2000-09-13

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81F0004G
    Description:

    The guide lists and briefly describes the main sources of data, and for each source gives: data coverage, main variables available, strengths and limitation of the data, historical continuity, frequency and means of dissemination, indication of the type of analysis that can be performed.

    Release date: 1998-03-30
Date modified: