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All (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019016
    Description:

    This interactive data visualization dashboard provides a comprehensive picture of research and development (R&D) activities in Canadian industry. Users will find extensive coverage of characteristics on R&D activities in Canadian industry. The dashboard features information on in-house as well as outsourced R&D expenditures, statistics on energy-related R&D expenditures by area of technology and details on intellectual property product commerce.

    Release date: 2019-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2015078
    Description:

    The increased pace of globalization has brought about many changes in both the Canadian and world economies. One important change has been the increased prevalence of global value chains which sees production processes spread out around the globe, across vertically integrated multinationals or via arm’s length trade. This paper focuses on two types of global production arrangements, namely, the case of merchanting and of goods send abroad for processing, with the limiting case of factoryless goods producers. Using the results of the 2009 and 2012 Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy, this report aims to provide an indication of the degree and nature of outsourcing among Canadian firms, with respect to these global production arrangements.

    Release date: 2015-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010003
    Description:

    Design activities are central to firm competitiveness and delivering value-added products. Research has shown that rapidly growing companies attach greater weight to design activities. Through design, firms may improve the user interface and create characteristics that allow them to distinguish their products from those of their competitors. Using the results of the Survey of Advanced Technology 2007, this paper examines the extent of use of design activities among Canadian firms, with a view to explaining factors fostering firms' engagement in design activities. It explores whether design activities are more likely to be carried out in some manufacturing industries than in others. The average size of firms undertaking design activities will also be explored. Characteristics of firms that are likely to spend a greater proportion of their expenditures on in-house design activities versus those who outsource larger percentage of their design work to other firms outside their organizational boundaries will be discussed. This paper will also explore whether firms that have high design intensity are more likely to be innovators. Another area of interest of this paper is the question of whether firms that undertake design activities are more likely to be exporters. Common success factors reported by those firms with high design intensity will also be discussed.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2008-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries. Second, it examines the relationship between offshoring and changes in trade patterns at the industry level. It focuses on two major drivers that some have suggested are behind the recent trends toward offshoring: globalization and technological changes associated with information and communications technologies. Third, the paper examines the economic impact of offshoring by investigating the relationship between the extent of offshoring and productivity growth, shifts to high value-added activities and changes in labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060019000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Revenue multipliers show most industries outsourced more of their inputs to other industries in recent years, especially business services. But this outsourcing does not capture each industry's impact on GDP. These output multipliers are quite different from revenue multipliers.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019016
    Description:

    This interactive data visualization dashboard provides a comprehensive picture of research and development (R&D) activities in Canadian industry. Users will find extensive coverage of characteristics on R&D activities in Canadian industry. The dashboard features information on in-house as well as outsourced R&D expenditures, statistics on energy-related R&D expenditures by area of technology and details on intellectual property product commerce.

    Release date: 2019-08-26

  • 2. Non-metal Mines Archived
    Table: 26-224-X
    Description:

    The publication presents data on establishments, employment, payroll, materials and supplies used; production and shipments; drilling completed and tonnage of ore removed. It also includes a list of establishments, notes and definitions and a bibliography.

    Release date: 1999-10-13

  • Table: 16F0002X
    Description:

    This report presents results and analysis of the Waste Management Industry Survey: Government Sector. The survey gathers information on waste collection, disposal and recycling practices of Canadian municipalities. The document provides an overview of waste management activities in large municipalities (5 000 or more residents). More than three quarters of the Canadian population are represented in this survey, allowing for estimates of municipal solid waste at the national level and for selected regional groupings. The report also presents information on waste management expenditures by local governments, including expenditures for services provided by contractors and by government employees.

    Release date: 1998-07-23
Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (0 to 10 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2019025
    Description:

    This study identifies gig workers based on characteristics of their work arrangements and how these are reported in tax data. It introduces a definition of gig work specific to the way work arrangements are reported in the Canadian tax system and estimates the size of the gig economy in Canada using administrative data. The share of gig workers among all workers rose from 5.5% in 2005 to 8.2% in 2016. Some of this increase coincided with the introduction and proliferation of online platforms. The analysis highlights gender differences in the trends and characteristics of gig workers. By linking administrative data to 2016 Census microdata, this study also examines educational and occupational differences in the prevalence of gig workers.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2015078
    Description:

    The increased pace of globalization has brought about many changes in both the Canadian and world economies. One important change has been the increased prevalence of global value chains which sees production processes spread out around the globe, across vertically integrated multinationals or via arm’s length trade. This paper focuses on two types of global production arrangements, namely, the case of merchanting and of goods send abroad for processing, with the limiting case of factoryless goods producers. Using the results of the 2009 and 2012 Survey of Innovation and Business Strategy, this report aims to provide an indication of the degree and nature of outsourcing among Canadian firms, with respect to these global production arrangements.

    Release date: 2015-05-22

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2010003
    Description:

    Design activities are central to firm competitiveness and delivering value-added products. Research has shown that rapidly growing companies attach greater weight to design activities. Through design, firms may improve the user interface and create characteristics that allow them to distinguish their products from those of their competitors. Using the results of the Survey of Advanced Technology 2007, this paper examines the extent of use of design activities among Canadian firms, with a view to explaining factors fostering firms' engagement in design activities. It explores whether design activities are more likely to be carried out in some manufacturing industries than in others. The average size of firms undertaking design activities will also be explored. Characteristics of firms that are likely to spend a greater proportion of their expenditures on in-house design activities versus those who outsource larger percentage of their design work to other firms outside their organizational boundaries will be discussed. This paper will also explore whether firms that have high design intensity are more likely to be innovators. Another area of interest of this paper is the question of whether firms that undertake design activities are more likely to be exporters. Common success factors reported by those firms with high design intensity will also be discussed.

    Release date: 2010-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2008020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2008-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2008055
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper has three main objectives. First, it presents the long-term trends in outsourcing and offshoring across Canadian industries. Second, it examines the relationship between offshoring and changes in trade patterns at the industry level. It focuses on two major drivers that some have suggested are behind the recent trends toward offshoring: globalization and technological changes associated with information and communications technologies. Third, the paper examines the economic impact of offshoring by investigating the relationship between the extent of offshoring and productivity growth, shifts to high value-added activities and changes in labour markets.

    Release date: 2008-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210330
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Recent improvements in information and communications technologies (ICTs), coupled with the rise of new global players such as China and India, have enabled firms to outsource a growing share of their activities. This has allowed them to benefit from cost savings and to focus on their core competencies. While domestic and foreign outsourcing of certain manufacturing functions have been prevalent for decades, only recently has the trend extended significantly to services such as legal, accounting, data entry, and research and development (R&D).

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2006010
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data on manufacturing plants operating in Canada for the period 1981 to 1997, we estimate the effect of changes in the level of foreign control upon labour productivity in domestically-controlled plants. We distinguish between foreign control in own industry of domestically-controlled plants and foreign control in industries linked by their supply or use of intermediate inputs. We find that foreign control increases productivity growth in domestically-controlled plants in a way that is consistent with the transfer of technology from foreign suppliers to domestically-controlled plants. The positive productivity effects of foreign control are more pronounced for those plants that outsource more intermediates, and who purchase science-based intermediate inputs (i.e., electronics, machinery and equipment, and chemicals).

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060019000
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Revenue multipliers show most industries outsourced more of their inputs to other industries in recent years, especially business services. But this outsourcing does not capture each industry's impact on GDP. These output multipliers are quite different from revenue multipliers.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2005035
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) and of foreign outsourcing on the demand for skilled workers. One of the defining features of the Canadian economy in the last two decades has been an increasing wage gap between more- and less-skilled workers. Over the same period, there have been dramatic increases in expenditures on information and communication technologies and in purchases of foreign intermediate inputs. Using data for 84 Canadian manufacturing industries over the 1981-1996 period, we find that both ICT and foreign outsourcing are important contributors to the demand for skills.

    Release date: 2005-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510813148
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Certain provisions such as pay, leave and supplementary medical coverage are common to virtually all collective agreements. Others such as a cost-of-living allowance reflect the socioeconomic climate of the times. From a list of 10 collective bargaining provisions, employers in the Workplace and Employee Survey were asked the ones included in their settlements. The two most common in 2001 dealt with job security and occupational health and safety.

    Release date: 2005-09-21
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