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All (28)

All (28) (10 to 20 of 28 results)

  • Table: 55-001-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication covers the activities of the major pipelines carrying crude oil and equivalents, liquefied petroleum gases such as propane, butane, ethane and others within and between provinces. The data are collected by province for receipts, deliveries, imports, exports and inventories.

    Release date: 2002-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20020026177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the economic importance of international tourism to the Chinese economy, and the prospect of China becoming a major international tourism market. After decades of rapid economic growth, economic reforms and rising incomes, China could become one of the world's largest sources of international tourists by 2020, as well as a market of more than 1.2 billion potential consumers. The article also briefly describes Chinese travel to Canada.

    Release date: 2002-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010036133
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For many countries, tourism has become an increasingly important economic activity; it is now common practice for national governments to practice for national governments to develop policies to encourage its growth.

    Release date: 2002-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20020016072
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Drawing on the results of the International Travel Survey (ITS), this article summarizes how Canadians' travel habits outside their country have evolved over the past decade, more especially with respect to destinations other than the United States.

    Release date: 2002-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20020016073
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Overnight international travel to Canada posted its highest second-quarter result in the 27 years that international travel data have been collected. More than 5.4 million travellers arrived from foreign countries in the second quarter, up 3.4% from the second quarter of 2000.

    Release date: 2002-01-28

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20010045949
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In keeping with the upward trend worldwide, international travel to Canada (all durations combined) increased by 5.2% for arrivals from overseas and 1.8% for arrivals from the United States in 1999.

    Release date: 2001-10-17

  • 17. World trends Archived
    Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015895
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Global tourism continued to grow in 1998 despite the financial crisis that affected much of the East Asia/Pacific region. However, the strong recovery of tourism in that region in 1999 helped boost international tourist arrivals at national borders to a record 663 million and receipts to US$455 billion.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015896
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In keeping with the upward trend worldwide, international travel to Canada (all durations combined) increased by 5.2% for arrivals from overseas and 1.8% for arrivals from the United States in 1999. Between 1998 and 1999 expenditures during those trips jumped by 9.5% and 6.5% for overseas and American visitors respectively.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • 19. Canadian travel Archived
    Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015897
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    With the Canadian economy in solid shape, the number of overnight trips made by Canadians in Canada remained steady in 1999, as did travel to overseas destinations. Despite the Canadian dollar's weakness relative to its American counterpart, overnight travel to the United States was up 5% from 1998.

    Release date: 2001-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X20010015901
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 1999, travel expenditures in Canada totalled $50.1 billion, of which $20.1 billion or 40% was transportation-related. Canadians and foreigners travel billions of kilometres per year in Canada - by air, train or boat or in road vehicles, including private passenger vehicles as well as urban buses and intercity motor coaches providing scheduled or charter services.

    Release date: 2001-10-12
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 35-006-X
    Description:

    This publication provides detailed information on office furniture products. It contains semi-annual and year-to-date data for the current and previous year on shipments of office furniture products and their destination. The data are also disaggregated by selected wooden and metal furniture products including such commodities as: upholstered chairs, swivel seats, complete systems, systems components and furniture panels, desks, vertical and lateral filing equipment and screens.

    Release date: 2003-05-06

  • Table: 55-001-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication covers the activities of the major pipelines carrying crude oil and equivalents, liquefied petroleum gases such as propane, butane, ethane and others within and between provinces. The data are collected by province for receipts, deliveries, imports, exports and inventories.

    Release date: 2002-07-24

  • Table: 51-204-X
    Description:

    This on-line publication presents statistics and analysis on the volume of domestic air passenger traffic generated at Canadian cities and carried between pairs of Canadian points. The data may be used to indicate the relative community of interest between Canadian cities.

    Release date: 2000-10-05
Analysis (24)

Analysis (24) (0 to 10 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2015366
    Description:

    Canada and the United States have recently experienced an increase in the regional dispersion of entering immigrants. American research suggests that a mixture of economic push factors (away from states like California) and pull factors (toward states with growth of low-wage jobs), as well as changing government policies and regulations contributed to the development of the ‘New Gateways.’ Very few studies have been conducted to determine why the regional dispersion of entering immigrants occurred in Canada. This paper assesses the relative importance of immigrant selection programs and immigrant source regions in accounting for changes in the regional dispersion of entering immigrants during the 2000s.

    Release date: 2015-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X200400010665
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In this article, the authors analyze the migration flows of Canadians between 2001 and 2006 using the 2006 Census data. First, the major internal migration movements are described at various geographic levels. The results can show certain phenomena that have marked the 2001-2006 intercensal period, such as the overall decline in mobility, the attraction exercised by Alberta, the urban expansion and the outflow of young people from rural areas. Second, various migrant characteristics are examined using a multivariate statistical model including several types of destination. The results help better understand the socio-demographic characteristics associated with mobility status, such as age, marital status, education, family structure or immigrant status.

    Release date: 2008-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200701210464
    Geography: Geographical region of Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines whether cross-border shopping has taken flight with the loonie. It finds that measured by the number of trips to the US, the average spent per trip or even online purchases, the recent increase in cross-border shopping has been minimal, especially outside of Ontario. More notable is the drop in US visitors to Canada. Meanwhile, overseas travel in and out of Canada continues to grow rapidly.

    Release date: 2007-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005005
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This bulletin examines the number and characteristics of travellers to rural Canada in 2002 in order to develop an initial understanding.

    Release date: 2005-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005254
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study examines changes in the geographic concentration of Canada's major immigrant groups, with respect to their initial destination and subsequent redistribution during the past two decades. At the same time, it examines the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in determining immigrants' locational choices. The results show a large rise in concentration levels at the initial destination among major immigrant groups throughout the 1970s and 1980s; this subsided in the following decade. Redistribution after immigration was generally small-scale, and had inconsistent effects on changing concentration at initial destinations among immigrant groups and across arrival cohorts within an immigrant group. Even for immigrant and refugee groups whose initial settlement was strongly influenced by government intervention, redistribution only partly altered general geographic distribution. Finally, this study finds that the size of the pre-existing immigrant community is not a significant factor in immigrant locational choice when location fixed effects are accounted for.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005255
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article summarizes findings from the research paper entitled: The Initial Destinations and Redistribution of Canada's Major Immigrant Groups: Changes over the Past Two Decades. In 1981, about 58% of immigrants who had come to Canada in the previous 10 years lived in Toronto, Vancouver, and Montréal; by 2001, this had increased to 74% (Statistics Canada 2003), triggering debate on the merits of a more 'balanced geographic distribution of immigrants' (Citizenship and Immigration Canada-CIC 2001). Policies aimed at directing immigrants away from major gateway cities in many western countries have focused on the choice of initial destination, and little effort has been made to affect subsequent mobility. But such policies will work only if other, non-gateway regions, can keep immigrants or maintain balanced in- and out-migration. To this end, this study examines how Canada's major immigrant groups arriving over the past two decades have altered their geographic concentration through time, comparing immigrants arriving in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, in the concentration levels of their initial destinations, and in their subsequent geographic dispersal. It pays attention to the dispersal pattern of groups whose initial settlements were influenced by government policies and questions the role of pre-existing immigrant communities in geographic distribution.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 91F0015M2004006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The paper assesses and compares new and old methodologies for official estimates of migration within and among provinces and territories for the period 1996/97 to 2000/01.

    Release date: 2004-06-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X20020026177
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the economic importance of international tourism to the Chinese economy, and the prospect of China becoming a major international tourism market. After decades of rapid economic growth, economic reforms and rising incomes, China could become one of the world's largest sources of international tourists by 2020, as well as a market of more than 1.2 billion potential consumers. The article also briefly describes Chinese travel to Canada.

    Release date: 2002-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010036133
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    For many countries, tourism has become an increasingly important economic activity; it is now common practice for national governments to practice for national governments to develop policies to encourage its growth.

    Release date: 2002-03-08
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