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All (62) (0 to 10 of 62 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-539-X
    Description:

    This document brings together guidelines and checklists on many issues that need to be considered in the pursuit of quality objectives in the execution of statistical activities. Its focus is on how to assure quality through effective and appropriate design or redesign of a statistical project or program from inception through to data evaluation, dissemination and documentation. These guidelines draw on the collective knowledge and experience of many Statistics Canada employees. It is expected that Quality Guidelines will be useful to staff engaged in the planning and design of surveys and other statistical projects, as well as to those who evaluate and analyze the outputs of these projects.

    Release date: 2019-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-621-M2018105
    Description:

    Statistics Canada needs to respond to the legalization of cannabis for non-medical use by measuring various aspects of the introduction of cannabis in the Canadian economy and society. An important part of measuring the economy and society is using statistical classifications. It is common practice with classifications that they are updated and revised as new industries, products, occupations and educational programs are introduced into the Canadian economy and society. This paper describes the changes to the various statistical classifications used by Statistics Canada in order to measure the introduction of legal non-medical cannabis.

    Release date: 2019-07-24

  • Classification: 12-583-X
    Description:

    This publication provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 2018-12-19

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    This classification system is used for organizing economic data by industry, and is used by Canada, Mexico and the United States. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 version 3.0 supersedes NAICS 2017 Version 2.0. NAICS is revised on a five-year cycle in order to ensure that the classification continues to reflect the changing structure of the economy. NAICS Canada 2017 version 3.0 groups economic activity into 20 sectors and 928 Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2018-09-20

  • Classification: 65-209-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Export Classification is a structured, hierarchical classification system based on the Harmonized Description and Coding System. The HS nomenclature is divided into 21 Sections, which in general, group goods produced in the same sector of the economy.

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names. It provides names and codes for the geographical regions of Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions (counties, regional municipalities) and census subdivisions (municipalities). The names and codes for census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones, economic regions, census agricultural regions and census consolidated subdivisions are shown in the classification variants of the SGC. Volume I explains the changes between the current version of the SGC and the previous version that impact upon the classification, such as changes in name, type or code, and indicates how the new and old codes relate to one another.

    Reference maps showing the locations and boundaries of the standard geographic areas in the classification are in Volume II, Reference Maps

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Classification: 12-590-X
    Description:

    The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is used for classifying instructional programs according to field of study. CIP was originally created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the United States. It is a hierarchical classification. CIP Canada is the adaptation of this classification for use in Canada. CIP Canada 2016 is made up of 49 2-digit series, 387 4-digit subseries and 1,689 6-digit instructional program classes. The classification provides a detailed description of each instructional program class together with illustrative examples of the types of instructional programs found in that class. Illustrative examples are also provided of closely related programs that are classified elsewhere. In addition, the classification includes an introduction to CIP and an alternative structure for the aggregation of field of study data. CIP has a ten-year revision cycle.

    Release date: 2016-08-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-606-G201600114618
    Description:

    An explanation of key national accounting concepts involving stocks and flows; the distinction between price and volume changes; production, distribution, consumption and accumulation; residence; institutional units and sectors; classifications; and accounting concepts. Also includes a description of SNA 2008’s sequence of accounts.

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 57-602-G
    Description:

    The objective of this document is to present a proposed Statistical Framework for Energy in Canada, which will help guide data providers and users in the development of a strategic plan for addressing priority elements of the proposed framework.

    The framework is intended to apply to energy statistics in Canada in general, with application across a broad range of stakeholders involved in the collection, dissemination and use of energy statistics, including provincial and territorial administrative and statistical agencies.

    Release date: 2016-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201501014292
    Description:

    This article describes the revisions to the balance of payments data and related statistical products introduced as part of the 2015 Comprehensive Revision of the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). This exercise is conducted to strengthen the overall quality of the international accounts program and to introduce new concepts and classifications as recommended by updated international standards. The revisions are also harmonized with those of the corresponding accounts in the CSMA.

    Release date: 2015-11-30
Data (7)

Data (7) ((7 results))

  • Table: 99-012-X2011057
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area, Census agglomeration, Census metropolitan area part, Census agglomeration part
    Description:

    This table presents a cross-tabulation of data using selected characteristics from the National Household Survey.

    Release date: 2013-12-11

  • Thematic map: 98-320-X2011003
    Description:

    This map shows the Statistical Area Classification - Variant of SGC 2011. This map illustrates the spatial distribution of CSDs among CMAs, CAs and MIZs.

    Release date: 2012-02-08

  • Profile of a community or region: 94-581-X2006011
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2006 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, marital status, Aboriginal identity, mother tongue, knowledge of official languages, mobility status, immigration, visible minority groups, education, labour force activity, occupation, industry, income and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2008-11-25

  • Table: 97-556-X2006021
    Description:

    Data for Canada, provinces, territories and census metropolitan areas are shown in this table.

    This table is part of the topic 'Mobility and migration', which presents data on the geographic mobility of Canadians; that is, on place of residence one year and five years prior to the census. These data include changes in place of residence for persons who moved within Canada and place of origin for persons who moved to Canada from another country at a given point in time.

    It is possible to subscribe to all the day-of-release topic bundles. Refer to Catalogue no. 97-569-XCB for more information.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

  • Profile of a community or region: 95F0495X2001012
    Description:

    This table contains information from the 2001 Census, presented according to the statistical area classification (SAC). The SAC groups census subdivisions according to whether they are a component of a census metropolitan area, a census agglomeration, a census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zone (strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ or no MIZ) or of the territories (Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon Territory). The SAC is used for data dissemination purposes.

    Data characteristics presented according to the SAC include age, visible minority groups, immigration, mother tongue, education, income, work and dwellings. Data are presented for Canada, provinces and territories. The data characteristics presented within this table may differ from those of other products in the "Profiles" series.

    Release date: 2004-02-27

  • Table: 92F0138M2000001
    Description:

    With this working paper, Statistics Canada is releasing 1991 Census data tabulated by a new geographic classification called "census metropolitan area and census agglomeration influenced zones", or MIZ. This classification applies to census subdivisions (municipalities) that lie outside census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations. This part of Canada covers 96% of the country's total land mass and contains 22% of its population, yet up to now we have been limited in our means of differentiating this vast area. The MIZ classification shows the influence of census metropolitan areas (CMA) and census agglomerations (CA) on surrounding census subdivisions as measured by commuting flows based on 1991 Census place of work data. This version of the MIZ classification also incorporates a preliminary version of a north concept that flags census subdivisions according to their location in the north or south of Canada.

    The series of tables presented here show detailed demographic, social and economic characteristics for Canada as a whole, for the six major regions of Canada, and for individual provinces and territories. Within each table, the data are subdivided into five categories: census metropolitan area or census agglomeration, strong MIZ, moderate MIZ, weak MIZ and no MIZ. Within each of these categories, the data are further subdivided into north and south.

    Readers are invited to review and use the data tables to assess whether this combined MIZ and north/south classification of non-CMA/CA areas provides sufficient detail to support data analysis and research. The intent of this MIZ classification is to reveal previously hidden data detail and thereby help users address issues related to this vast geographic area.

    This is the first of three related Geography working papers (catalogue no. 92F0138MPE). The second working paper (no. 2000-2, 92F0138MPE00002) provides background information about the methodology used to delineate the MIZ classification. The third working paper (no. 2000-3, 92F0138MPE00003) describes the methodology used to define a continuous line across Canada that separates the north from the south to further differentiate the MIZ classification.

    Release date: 2000-02-03
Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 57-602-G
    Description:

    The objective of this document is to present a proposed Statistical Framework for Energy in Canada, which will help guide data providers and users in the development of a strategic plan for addressing priority elements of the proposed framework.

    The framework is intended to apply to energy statistics in Canada in general, with application across a broad range of stakeholders involved in the collection, dissemination and use of energy statistics, including provincial and territorial administrative and statistical agencies.

    Release date: 2016-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201501014292
    Description:

    This article describes the revisions to the balance of payments data and related statistical products introduced as part of the 2015 Comprehensive Revision of the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). This exercise is conducted to strengthen the overall quality of the international accounts program and to introduce new concepts and classifications as recommended by updated international standards. The revisions are also harmonized with those of the corresponding accounts in the CSMA.

    Release date: 2015-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008008
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    One of the most common terms in economic and social reporting is that of "labour market". This concept is normally used with two main connotations, which to some extent overlap. The first emphasizes a set of employment norms, practices and trends that are in some cases specific to certain occupations or industries. The second connotation emphasizes the spatial dimension of the market, as the geographic area in which a multitude of labour activities occur. In this bulletin, our focus is on this second aspect: we identify a set of self-contained labour areas (SLAs), which in broad terms can be described as geographic spaces in which the majority of the residents in the labour force also have their place of work.

    Release date: 2011-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800410747
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A selective approach may be used in an ecological study where the aim is to choose a subset of units of analysis (UAs) and produce interpretations about a population of interest (PI) based solely on those UAs. The results for the PI will be reliable if that population is concentrated in the selected UAs and rare in other UAs. This article presents a graphical tool that helps determine whether these conditions are satisfied.

    Release date: 2008-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M1992006
    Description:

    Labour force status will be an important analytical variable for many users of SLID data. The document discusses the issues involved in deriving this variable, and details the approach to be adopted.

    Briefly, a value will be assigned for every one-week period, with three possibilities: employed, unemployed and not in the labour force. To a large extent, concepts used in the Canadian Labour Force Survey will be used. Since there are several situations where a straightforward approach to the classification is not possible, additional information will be available to data users who wish to adjust the definitions used.

    Release date: 2008-02-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X20050019458
    Description:

    The proposed paper presents an alternative methodology that gives the data the possibility of defining homogenous groups determined by a bottom up classification of the values of observed details. The problem is then to assign a non respondent business to one of these groups. Several assignment procedures, based on explanatory variables available in the tax returns, are compared, using gross or distributed data: parametric and non parametric classification analyses, log linear models, etc.

    Release date: 2007-03-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-001-M2004001
    Description:

    The collection of firms producing environmental goods and delivering environmental services constitutes the 'environment industry.' This industry has grown significantly in the past 20 years and stands to continue this development in the future as emerging issues such as the level of greenhouse gas emissions are addressed.

    An important aspect in the evaluation of the industry's performance is in the area of job creation and employment generation. Related to the challenges involved in classifying firms to the environment industry is the issue of identifying the employees who work in environment-related activities. Currently, the published data on employment include only the total employment of those businesses producing environmental goods and services, i.e., employees who worked in the production/provision of goods and services that have both environmental and non-environmental applications.

    Release date: 2004-04-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 71-586-X
    Description:

    This paper is a response to the requests of Canadian policy makers and researchers to develop a comprehensive index of total labour costs for the Canadian economy. This Labour Cost Index (LCI), which measures both wage and non-wage costs, would be free from the influence of employment shifts in industries and occupations.

    This paper provides a review of the U.S. Employment Cost Index (ECI). The paper describes the LCI in general terms and compares this measure of labour cost with some other Canadian labour market indicators. The paper lists some of the uses and limitations of labour cost index based on the experiences of some other countries with such an index. The paper outlines the proposed plans and micro data model to be tested to develop a Canadian LCI. The major milestones and development issues are summarized in the paper.

    Release date: 2001-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X20000025539
    Description:

    In this paper we will combine two applications of multilevel models. The multilevel model is suitable to analyze interviewer effects on survey data. It can also be used to analyze longitudinal - "repeated measurements" - data. We will analyze a data quality indicator of panel data that come from the Belgian Election Studies.

    Release date: 2001-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 15-204-X19990005495
    Description:

    This chapter examines productivity growth in manufacturing by size of establishment and by whether it is Canadian- or foreign-owned.

    Release date: 2001-02-14
Reference (38)

Reference (38) (0 to 10 of 38 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-539-X
    Description:

    This document brings together guidelines and checklists on many issues that need to be considered in the pursuit of quality objectives in the execution of statistical activities. Its focus is on how to assure quality through effective and appropriate design or redesign of a statistical project or program from inception through to data evaluation, dissemination and documentation. These guidelines draw on the collective knowledge and experience of many Statistics Canada employees. It is expected that Quality Guidelines will be useful to staff engaged in the planning and design of surveys and other statistical projects, as well as to those who evaluate and analyze the outputs of these projects.

    Release date: 2019-12-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 11-621-M2018105
    Description:

    Statistics Canada needs to respond to the legalization of cannabis for non-medical use by measuring various aspects of the introduction of cannabis in the Canadian economy and society. An important part of measuring the economy and society is using statistical classifications. It is common practice with classifications that they are updated and revised as new industries, products, occupations and educational programs are introduced into the Canadian economy and society. This paper describes the changes to the various statistical classifications used by Statistics Canada in order to measure the introduction of legal non-medical cannabis.

    Release date: 2019-07-24

  • Classification: 12-583-X
    Description:

    This publication provides a systematic classification structure to identify and categorize the entire range of occupational activity in Canada. It consists of 10 broad occupational categories which are subdivided into major groups, minor groups and unit groups. Definitions and occupational titles are provided for each unit group. An alphabetical index of the occupational titles classified to the unit group level is also included.

    Release date: 2018-12-19

  • Classification: 12-501-X
    Description:

    This classification system is used for organizing economic data by industry, and is used by Canada, Mexico and the United States. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Canada 2017 version 3.0 supersedes NAICS 2017 Version 2.0. NAICS is revised on a five-year cycle in order to ensure that the classification continues to reflect the changing structure of the economy. NAICS Canada 2017 version 3.0 groups economic activity into 20 sectors and 928 Canadian industries.

    Release date: 2018-09-20

  • Classification: 65-209-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Export Classification is a structured, hierarchical classification system based on the Harmonized Description and Coding System. The HS nomenclature is divided into 21 Sections, which in general, group goods produced in the same sector of the economy.

    Release date: 2017-12-11

  • Geographic files and documentation: 12-571-X
    Description:

    The Standard Geographical Classification (SGC) provides a systematic classification structure that categorizes all of the geographic area of Canada. The SGC is the official classification used in the Census of Population and other Statistics Canada surveys.

    The classification is organized in two volumes: Volume I, The Classification and Volume II, Reference Maps.

    Volume I describes the classification and related standard geographic areas and place names. It provides names and codes for the geographical regions of Canada, provinces and territories, census divisions (counties, regional municipalities) and census subdivisions (municipalities). The names and codes for census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census metropolitan influenced zones, economic regions, census agricultural regions and census consolidated subdivisions are shown in the classification variants of the SGC. Volume I explains the changes between the current version of the SGC and the previous version that impact upon the classification, such as changes in name, type or code, and indicates how the new and old codes relate to one another.

    Reference maps showing the locations and boundaries of the standard geographic areas in the classification are in Volume II, Reference Maps

    Release date: 2016-11-16

  • Classification: 12-590-X
    Description:

    The Classification of Instructional Programs (CIP) is used for classifying instructional programs according to field of study. CIP was originally created by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) in the United States. It is a hierarchical classification. CIP Canada is the adaptation of this classification for use in Canada. CIP Canada 2016 is made up of 49 2-digit series, 387 4-digit subseries and 1,689 6-digit instructional program classes. The classification provides a detailed description of each instructional program class together with illustrative examples of the types of instructional programs found in that class. Illustrative examples are also provided of closely related programs that are classified elsewhere. In addition, the classification includes an introduction to CIP and an alternative structure for the aggregation of field of study data. CIP has a ten-year revision cycle.

    Release date: 2016-08-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 13-606-G201600114618
    Description:

    An explanation of key national accounting concepts involving stocks and flows; the distinction between price and volume changes; production, distribution, consumption and accumulation; residence; institutional units and sectors; classifications; and accounting concepts. Also includes a description of SNA 2008’s sequence of accounts.

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-012-X2011006
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This reference guide provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). This guide contains definitions and explanations of concepts, classifications, data quality and comparability to other sources. Additional information is included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the NHS.

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 99-012-X2011007
    Description:

    This reference guide provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). This guide contains definitions and explanations of concepts, classifications, data quality and comparability to other sources. Additional information is included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the NHS.

    Release date: 2013-06-26
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