Table 5
Divorce cases by time since initiation, selected provinces and territories, 2010/2011

Warning View the most recent version.

Archived Content

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please "contact us" to request a format other than those available.

Table 5
Divorce cases by time since initiation, selected provinces and territories, 2010/2011
Province or territoryNote 2 Time since initiationNote 1 Total active divorce casesNote 3
1 year or less Greater than 1 year to 2 years Greater than 2 years to 3 years Greater than 3 years to 4 years Greater than 4 years Unknown
number
Nova Scotia 1,792 1,325 524 355 1,355 3 5,354
Ontario 31,281 14,907 3,530 1,404 2,100 0 53,222
Alberta 9,726 6,804 3,173 1,971 7,616 206 29,496
British Columbia 10,832 5,926 2,160 2,105 3,701 8 24,732
Yukon 89 52 20 14 46 0 221
Northwest Territories 72 38 11 4 11 0 136
Nunavut 12 12 1 4 3 0 32
Total 53,804 29,064 9,419 5,857 14,832 217 113,193
percent
Nova Scotia 33 25 10 7 25 Note : not applicable 100
Ontario 59 28 7 3 4 Note : not applicable 100
Alberta 33 23 11 7 26 Note : not applicable 100
British Columbia 44 24 9 9 15 Note : not applicable 100
Yukon 40 24 9 6 21 Note : not applicable 100
Northwest Territories 53 28 8 3 8 Note : not applicable 100
Nunavut 38 38 3 13 9 Note : not applicable 100
Total 48 26 8 5 13 Note : not applicable 100
 
… not applicable
1. Time since initiation is based on the year of case initiation with a fiscal year-end of March 31.
2. Excludes data from Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec, Manitoba and Saskatchewan due to the unavailability of data.
3. Refers to cases that had activity or were initiated during the year.
Note: It is important to note that differences in how cases are processed in the provinces and territories may impact results related to "time since initiation" and comparisons between jurisdictions should be made with caution. For example, depending on jurisdictional practices, a variation of an existing order or further disputes related to the same family may either be captured under the original case file (which may distribute cases toward a longer "time since initiation") (e.g., as in British Columbia) or as a new case.
Source: Statistics Canada, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Civil Court Survey.
Date modified: