Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

May 2019

Does geography matter in mortality? An analysis of potentially avoidable mortality by remoteness index in Canada

by Rajendra Subedi, T. Lawson Greenberg and Shirin Roshanafshar

Despite the tremendous amount of ongoing research, the mechanism of urban–rural health disparities is not fully understood in Canada. Although rural and remote location in itself may not necessarily lead to poor health, it may influence other socioeconomic, environmental and occupational health determinants. There is noticeable heterogeneity within and between rural communities in Canada in terms of socioeconomic and geographic characteristics. However, in general, people who live in rural communities have limited access to health care services and have worse health outcomes than their urban counterparts. This may lead to disproportionate mortality rates between urban and rural communities.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

Related articles

Does geography matter in mortality? An analysis of potentially avoidable mortality by remoteness index in Canada

A pan-Canadian measure of active living environments using open data

by Thomas Herrmann, William Gleckner, Rania A. Wasfi, Benoît Thierry, Yan Kestens and Nancy A. Ross

Modifiable elements of neighbourhood environments (e.g., number of sidewalks, proximity to commercial services, population density) can increase rates of active transportation (walking and cycling for the purpose of transportation, and using public transportation). Public health and urban planning researchers often measure three characteristics of communities that support active travel: higher street connectivity (e.g., intersection density, route directness), higher density (e.g., population density, dwelling density), and greater numbers and diversity of nearby destinations. Canadian research suggests that exposure to these favourable “active living environments” is associated with more optimal markers of health, including more optimal systolic blood pressure, decreased obesity, overweight and diabetes prevalence, and improved body mass trajectories among men.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

Related articles

A pan-Canadian measure of active living environments using open data

Factor structure of a coping measure in the 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

by Jennifer E.C. Lee, Stacey Silins and Christine Frank

Coping is commonly believed to represent efforts to prevent or lessen threat, harm and loss, or to reduce distress. This concept was brought to the forefront of research as part of the body of work on cognitive appraisals that grew in the 1970s. In particular, based on the cognitive appraisal theory of stress, when individuals face a potentially threatening or stressful event, they engage in primary appraisal, where they assess the level of personal threat that they encounter. This is followed by a secondary appraisal, during which individuals assess the extent of resources they have available to help them deal with this threat. In response, individuals may experience a range of emotions that influence the specific coping strategies they use to deal with a threatening or stressful event.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

Related articles

Factor structure of a coping measure in the 2013 Canadian Forces Mental Health Survey

Date modified: