Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

November 2018

Health Utilities Index Mark 3 Scores for Major Chronic Conditions: Population Norms for Canada Based on the 2013 and 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey

by Jason R. Guertin, Brittany Humphries, David Feeny and Jean-Éric Tarride

Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has many definitions. One common definition for HRQoL within the health economic literature is the “values assigned to different health states.” Those values are also known as utility scores. By convention, a utility score of 1.00 is assigned to a perfect health state, and a utility score of 0.00 is assigned to a dead state. Health states considered worse than dead are assigned a negative value.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Health Utilities Index Mark 3 Scores for Major Chronic Conditions: Population Norms for Canada Based on the 2013 and 2014 Canadian Community Health Survey

Unmet home care needs in Canada

by Heather Gilmour

Home care encompasses a wide range of services delivered to individuals of all ages in their home rather than in a hospital or long-term care facility. Purposes of home care services include short-term care for recovery from surgery or acute illness, longer-term care for those who are disabled or experiencing limitations because of a chronic condition or aging, or care for those who are terminally ill. Unlike hospital and physician services, home care is not an insured service under the Canada Health Act. Therefore, the provinces and territories are not required to offer it to qualify for federal transfers for health care. However, all provinces and territories have home care programs that are an important component of the health care system. Variations in how expenditures are recorded and which services are included pose challenges to estimating overall costs. Two recent estimates of home care expenditures range from $3.7 billion to $5.9 billion.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Unmet home care needs in Canada

Understanding future needs of Canadian veterans

by Linda D. VanTil, Mary Beth MacLean, Jill Sweet and Kristofer McKinnon

An estimated 658,000 veterans were living in Canada as of March 2017. Veterans are former members of the Canadian Armed Forces (Regular Force or Reserve Force). Unfortunately, there is no detailed listing of the 650,000 Canadians who served in the First World War, the 1,037,000 who served in the Second World War, the 26,800 who served in the Korean War, or the many who served in the Canadian Armed Forces since 1954. Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) uses several sources to estimate the size and age structure of the veteran population in Canada. These sources are used to forecast future veteran population estimates, but do not describe veterans’ health.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Understanding future needs of Canadian veterans

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