Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

August 2018

Using data linkage to report surgical treatment of breast cancer in Canada

by Gisèle Carrière, Claudia Sanmartin, and Patricia Murison

Women in Canada are more likely to develop breast cancer than any other type of cancer. The lifetime probability of developing breast cancer (based on 2010 data) is 1 in 8 for women. An estimated 26,300 new cases of breast cancer and 5,000 deaths because of breast cancer were expected to have occurred in 2017. While the number of new breast cancer cases has been increasing, due largely to an aging population and population growth, the age-standardized incidence rate has remained stable. The age-standardized breast cancer mortality rate has been decreasing over time, falling 44% from 41.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 1988 to 23.2 deaths per 100,000 population in 2017. This is likely partly the result of earlier diagnosis through screening and treatment advances.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Using data linkage to report surgical treatment of breast cancer in Canada

Canadians vulnerable to workplace noise

by Pamela L. Ramage-Morin and Marc Gosselin

Excessive workplace noise can contribute to elevated blood pressure, sleep disturbance, stress, noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL), tinnitus and other negative health conditions. An estimated 22.4 million U.S. workers (17%) reported that, in their current jobs, they had to speak in raised voices to be heard. This is indicative of a hazardous noise level equivalent to at least 85 dB. Over 11 million Canadians (42%) worked in noisy environments in 2012 and 2013, or had done so in the past.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Canadians vulnerable to workplace noise

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