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A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

December 2016

Missing paternal data and adverse birth outcomes in Canada

by Gabriel D. Shapiro, Tracey Bushnik, Amanda J. Sheppard, Michael S. Kramer, Jay S. Kaufman and Seungmi Yang

In recent decades, the focus of perinatal research has extended beyond biomedical risk factors to include psychosocial variables, families and communities, and the role of paternal characteristics. However, as the range of factors investigated expands, so does the amount of missing data, a situation that could adversely affect analyses.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Missing paternal data and adverse birth outcomes in Canada

Linking the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database: An enhanced data source for the study of mortality

by Claudia Sanmartin, Yves Decady, Richard Trudeau, Abel Dasylva, Michael Tjepkema, Philippe Finès, Rick Burnett, Nancy Ross and Douglas G. Manuel

In most industrialized countries, vital statistics registries and national health surveys are cornerstones of health surveillance. Mortality data compiled by vital statistics registries for administrative purposes can be tabulated by basic demographic characteristics (age and sex), province and cause of death. However, little is known about the socioeconomic, cultural or linguistic characteristics of those who die, or about the contributions of lifestyle and social factors to mortality risk.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Linking the Canadian Community Health Survey and the Canadian Mortality Database: An enhanced data source for the study of mortality

Acute care hospitalization of refugees to Canada: Linked data for immigrants from Poland, Vietnam and the Middle East

by Edward Ng, Claudia Sanmartin and Douglas G. Manuel

Relatively little information is available at the national level about the health of refugees in Canada. Evidence from the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada showed that refugees were more likely than other immigrants to report poor health. Possible explanations include hardships associated with the involuntary nature of their migration and post-migration difficulty obtaining support and health care.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Acute care hospitalization of refugees to Canada: Linked data for immigrants from Poland, Vietnam and the Middle East

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