Health Reports

A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

September 2016

Outdoor time, physical activity, sedentary time, and health indicators at ages 7 to 14: 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey

by Richard Larouche, Didier Garriguet, Katie E. Gunnell, Gary S. Goldfield and Mark S. Tremblay

International evidence consistently shows that the majority of children and youth are not sufficiently active. This is often described as a physical inactivity crisis because, even at young ages, low physical activity is associated with the clustering of cardiovascular disease risk factors. Furthermore, population-based studies have reported that more than half the waking hours of children and adolescents are spent engaging in sedentary behaviours, which is also associated with detrimental health and psychosocial outcomes.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Outdoor time, physical activity, sedentary time, and health indicators at ages 7 to 14: 2012/2013 Canadian Health Measures Survey

Physical activity and sedentary behaviour of Canadian children aged 3 to 5

by Didier Garriguet, Valerie Carson, Rachel C. Colley, Ian Janssen, Brian W. Timmons and Mark S. Tremblay

For preschool children, physical activity is associated with improved measures of adiposity, motor skill development, psychosocial health and cardiometabolic health indicators, while sedentary behaviour, notably screen time, is associated with increased adiposity and decreased psychosocial and cognitive development. In 2012, this evidence was used to develop physical activity and sedentary behaviour4 guidelines for Canadian children aged 0 to 4.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Physical activity and sedentary behaviour of Canadian children aged 3 to 5

Epilepsy in Canada: Prevalence and impact

by Heather Gilmour, Pamela Ramage-Morin and Suzy L. Wong

Epilepsy is a chronic neurological condition characterized by spontaneous seizures, ranging in severity from a lapse in concentration to unconsciousness. The World Health Organization recognizes epilepsy as a major public health concern, estimating that more than 50 million people worldwide live with the condition. Epilepsy may be genetic in origin or the result of conditions affecting the brain such as tumors, infection, head injury, lack of oxygen (for example, at birth), and stroke. However, in more than half of cases, the cause is unknown. Epilepsy can be diagnosed at any age, and is associated with increased risk of premature death. An estimated 65% to 85% of cases eventually enter long-term remission.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Epilepsy in Canada: Prevalence and impact

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