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A Canadian peer-reviewed journal of population health and health services research

June 2016

Out-of-pocket spending on drugs and pharmaceutical products and cost-related prescription non-adherence among Canadians with chronic disease

by Deirdre Hennessy, Claudia Sanmartin, Paul Ronksley, Rob Weaver, Dave Campbell, Braden Manns, Marcello Tonelli and Brenda Hemmelgarn

Prescription drugs are essential in the management of chronic diseases—an estimated 90% of individuals with major chronic conditions report taking one or more medications. Unlike hospital and physician care, prescription medications (other than those provided in hospital) are not covered by a universal insurance plan. Although all Canadian provinces provide some publicly funded drug insurance for certain segments of the population such as seniors and people receiving social assistance, provinces differ in their coverage of prescription medications for other groups and in the provision of catastrophic drug coverage. For many Canadians, prescription drugs are financed primarily through private insurance and out-of-pocket expenditures. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information, out-of-pocket spending made up 34.3% of private expenditures on prescription medications in 2010.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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Out-of-pocket spending on drugs and pharmaceutical products and cost-related prescription non-adherence among Canadians with chronic disease

Child functional characteristics explain child and family outcomes better than diagnosis: Population-based study of children with autism or other neurodevelopmental disorders/disabilities

by Anton Miller, Jane Shen and Louise C. Mâsse

Children with neurodevelopmental disorders/disabilities (NDD/D) or “neurodisability” are the largest identifiable subpopulation of children with disabilities and account for 7% to 14 % of all children in developed countries. NDD/D comprise an array of conditions characterized by impairment in posture-mobility, cognitive-adaptive functioning, communication, relating socially, and regulating emotions and behaviour; biological or physical markers of a specific medical condition may or may not be present. Diagnoses under NDD/D include autism spectrum disorders (ASD), intellectual or learning disabilities, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), cerebral palsy, and Down and fetal alcohol syndromes.

Abstract Full article PDF version The Daily release

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