Insights on Canadian Society

Harassment in Canadian workplaces

by Darcy Hango and Melissa Moyser

Release date: December 17, 2018

Harassment in the workplace can come in a variety of forms, with the potential for far-reaching effects on the health and well-being of workers, as well as on their job tenure, job stability and job satisfaction. Using data from 2016 General Social Survey on Canadians at Work and Home (GSS), this study focuses on workplace harassment experienced by respondents at some point in the past year. The target population includes those who were aged 15 to 64 and worked for pay in the past year.

Results from the 2016 Census: Aboriginal languages and the role of second-language acquisition

by Thomas Anderson

Release date: December 7, 2018

Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which Aboriginal languages are spoken in Canada, and whether the number of Aboriginal-language speakers rose in past decades. The study also examines the factors that are related to Aboriginal language use and retention.

The association between job flexibility and job satisfaction

by Steve Martin

Release date: December 4, 2018

This study explores the association between job flexibility and job satisfaction among men and women aged 18 to 64, using data from the 2014 Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA). Four aspects of job flexibility are examined: the order of work (or the sequence of tasks), how the work is done, the speed of work, and the hours of work.

Preparing the social statistics system for the legalization of cannabis

by Kathryn Wilkins, Benjamin Mazowita and Michelle Rotermann

Release date: October 12, 2018

In anticipation of legislation (Bill C-45) legalizing cannabis for non-medical use coming into force, Statistics Canada has undertaken a thorough review of its capability to evaluate the bill’s impact. In the fall of 2017, the agency presented a strategy to incorporate the cannabis industry into the System of National Accounts. This document focuses on the agency’s social statistics system—specifically, surveys and administrative databases designed to collect information related to health and health care; law enforcement; the justice system and community safety and well-being; education; and labour. It describes recent adjustments and initiatives undertaken to enhance the capability of assessing the impact of legalizing cannabis for non-medical use on health and social institutions, and measuring outcomes against the legislation’s objectives.

Results from the 2016 Census: Is field of study a factor in the payoff of a graduate degree?

by Katherine Wall, John Zhao, Sarah-Jane Ferguson and Carlos Rodriguez

Release date: September 26, 2018

More and more Canadians are pursuing graduate studies, often to increase their chances of getting a better-paying job. Using data from the 2016 Census, this study examines the extent to which median earnings of workers with a master’s degree or doctorate differ from their counterparts with a bachelor’s degree, focusing on differences across fields of study. The target population includes paid employees aged 30 to 59 who worked full year and full time during the year preceding the census, and whose highest educational qualification was obtained in Canada.

Workers looking for a new job

by Manon Langevin

Release date: July 11, 2018

This study uses data from the Longitudinal and International Study of Adults (LISA) to provide information on individuals looking for work even if they are already employed. The study examines the reasons why workers want to look for a new job. The paper also explores the links between looking for a job while employed, the characteristics of workers seeking a new job and their level of job satisfaction.

Recent changes in the composition of minimum wage workers

by René Morissette and Dominique Dionne-Simard

Release date: June 13, 2018

This study uses the 2017 and 2018 Labour Force Survey to provide a recent profile of minimum wage workers. The paper focuses on three groups of minimum wage workers: students aged 15 to 24 and non-students the same age living with their parents (referred to below as minimum wage workers under 25); individuals aged 15 to 64 who are single, lone parents or spouses/partners in single-earner couples; and individuals aged 15 to 64 who are spouses/partners in dual-earner couples. The article documents the relative importance of these three groups as well as their weekly wages and work patterns.

Women and men who experienced cyberstalking in Canada

by Amanda Burlock and Tamara Hudon

Release date: June 5, 2018

Using data from the 2014 General Social Survey on Canadians’ Safety (Victimization), this study examines the prevalence of cyberstalking among women and men aged 15 and over living in the 10 Canadian provinces. This study also examines several factors associated with experiences of cyberstalking—specifically, self-rated mental health and satisfaction with personal safety from crime.

Results from the 2016 Census: Work activity of families with children in Canada

by André Bernard

Release date: May 15, 2018

This article uses data from the Census of the Population to examine changes between 2005 and 2015 in the work activity patterns of Canadian families with children. Results by education level and by immigration status are discussed, as well as results for lone parent families. The paper also provides an overview of regional differences in the work activity patterns of Canadian families.

Association between the frequency of cannabis use and selected social indicators

by Darcy Hango and Sébastien LaRochelle-Côté

Release date: May 3, 2018

Based on data from the 2015 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey and the 2014 General Social Survey on Victimization, this article examines recent cannabis use in Canada, with a focus on the characteristics of people who use cannabis. It also discusses the harmful effects from cannabis consumption reported by those who use cannabis, as well as the association between frequency of cannabis use and selected social indicators such as self-reported health, confidence in police and the justice system, and victimization.

A day in the life: How do older Canadians spend their time?

by Paula Arriagada

Release date: March 21, 2018

This study uses the 2015 General Social Survey on Time Use to examine the time spent by Canadian seniors aged 65 and over on various activities. The paper focuses on three types of activities: unpaid household work, active pursuits and passive leisure activities. It examines the factors associated with time spent on these activities, and also provides comparisons with the 1986 General Social Survey on Time Use.

Long-term job vacancies in Canada

by Manon Langevin

Release date: February 20, 2018

This study uses data from the Job Vacancy and Wage Survey (JVWS) to examine the characteristics of long-term job vacancies, defined as positions for which recruitment efforts had been ongoing for 90 days or more on the day of the survey. Specifically, the study aims to answer the following questions: What is the prevalence of long-term job vacancies in Canada? How do these vacancies differ from other vacant jobs? Is there a link between the duration of the vacancy and the offered wage?

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