Estimated gross annual earnings and student debt of postsecondary graduates in Canada: Interactive tool

Release date: November 5, 2019
Data

The data used to create this interactive web application is from the following listed data tables:

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Additional information

For more information on how to use this tool, consult the guide “How to use” available on this page (top right).

Notes

The target population for the 2018 National Graduates Survey (NGS) (class of 2015) corresponds to graduates of public postsecondary educational institutions in Canada during the 2015 calendar year who were living in Canada at the time of the interview.

All estimates were subject to rounding.

College includes college or other non-university certificates, college or other non-university diplomas, collège d'enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP) certificates, and CEGEP diplomas.

Bachelor's includes bachelor's degrees, degrees in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine and optometry, university certificates below bachelor's degrees, and university diplomas below bachelor's degrees.

Master's includes master's degrees, university diplomas above bachelor's degrees, and university certificates above bachelor's degrees.

Statistics on student debt exclude graduates who pursued further postsecondary education between graduation in 2015 and the time of the interview in 2018 (three years after graduation).

The average student debt owed at graduation excludes graduates who never had student debt and those who had paid off their student debt by graduation.

The Canada-level estimates for the province of study include the Yukon, the Northwest Territories and Nunavut.

The Canada-level estimates for the province of residence three years after graduation include the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and "Canada, unknown province/territory".

Estimated gross annual earnings exclude graduates who pursued further postsecondary education between graduation in 2015 and the time of the interview in 2018 as well as graduates who were either working part time or not working three years after graduation.

Working full time refers to usually working 30 hours or more per week at a single job or business.

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