A Presentation Series from Statistics Canada About the Economy, Environment and Society
Economic impacts of COVID-19 in the provinces and territories

Release date: June 23, 2021

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Lower economic activity during the COVID-19 pandemic highlights underlying differences in regional economies

While accommodation and food services, retail trade, and transportation services declined in all areas of the country, province-specific factors, including construction activities related to resource projects, played a key role in explaining how severely output contracted during 2020.

Chart 1 Cumulative percentage change in real gross domestic product, 2014 to 2019

Data table for Chart 1 
Data table for chart 1
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 1 Percent (appearing as column headers).
Percent
Newfoundland and Labrador 2.1
Prince Edward Island 16.7
Nova Scotia 8.8
New Brunswick 5.8
Quebec 11.7
Ontario 13.3
Manitoba 8.6
Saskatchewan 1.5
Alberta -1.1
British Columbia 15.1
Yukon 5.6
Northwest Territories -4.3
Nunavut 32.7
Canada 9.7

Chart 2 Annual percentage change in real gross domestic product, 2019 and 2020

Data table for Chart 2 
Data table for chart 2
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 2 2019 and 2020, calculated using percent units of measure (appearing as column headers).
2019 2020
percent
Newfoundland and Labrador 4.0 -5.3
Prince Edward Island 5.1 -3.0
Nova Scotia 2.5 -3.2
New Brunswick 1.1 -3.7
Quebec 2.7 -5.3
Ontario 2.1 -5.0
Manitoba 0.5 -4.8
Saskatchewan -0.9 -5.2
Alberta 0.0 -8.2
British Columbia 2.5 -3.8
Yukon 0.7 1.1
Northwest Territories -8.1 -10.4
Nunavut 6.5 3.5
Canada 1.8 -5.3

In Atlantic Canada

  • In the Maritime Provinces, increases in real estate activity and financial services helped mitigate steep declines in tourism-related sectors. Construction activity also rose in Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia.
  • About one half of the decline in Newfoundland and Labrador’s economic output reflected lower engineering construction linked to major resource projects.

In Central Canada

  • Lower manufacturing activity in Ontario and Quebec accounted for nearly one quarter of the declines in economic output, while increases in financial activity helped mitigate losses in both provinces.

In Western Canada

  • Reductions in engineering construction linked to resource projects exacerbated declines in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Lower oil and gas extraction in Alberta and Saskatchewan also contributed to sizable declines in economic activity.
  • Increases in engineering construction linked to major resource projects in British Columbia helped offset lower manufacturing output. Notable increases in real estate activity also helped to mitigate declines in high-contact sectors.

In Northern Canada

  • Yukon and Nunavut were the only jurisdictions where real gross domestic product rose in 2020, led by sharp increases in mining activity. Economic output in the Northwest Territories fell by 10% on lower mining and oil and gas extraction.

More resilient economic activity during the second and third waves as businesses and households continued to adjust to containment measures

  • New monthly estimates of economic activity highlight steep declines in Alberta and Saskatchewan since the start of the pandemic, and along with sizable declines in Ontario, New Brunswick and Quebec. These reflect large decreases in economic activity during the initial lockdowns.
  • While activity levels have generally remained resilient during the second and third waves, the monthly data point to a slowdown in the pace of the recovery in many regions of the country as containment measures tightened during late 2020 and early 2021.

Chart 3 Percentage change in experimental indexes of economic activity, February 2020 to January 2021

Data table for Chart 3 
Data table for chart 3
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 3 PCA-based index and LASSO-based index, calculated using percent units of measure (appearing as column headers).
PCA-based index LASSO-based index
percent
Newfoundland and Labrador Note .: not available for any reference period 3.0
Prince Edward Island -3.5 1.7
Nova Scotia 1.2 1.6
New Brunswick -6.0 0.7
Quebec -5.3 0.5
Ontario -9.1 -0.1
Manitoba 4.2 2.5
Saskatchewan -17.5 0.2
Alberta -25.0 -13.0
British Columbia -0.2 1.0
Yukon Note .: not available for any reference period 3.4
Northwest Territories -4.8 Note .: not available for any reference period
Nunavut Note .: not available for any reference period 4.1

British Columbia: Strongest employment recovery in Canada

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product rose by 2.5% in 2019, supported by notable increases in construction & real estate activity.
  • Employment in finance & education rose by 12,200 during 2019, while net losses in manufacturing exceeded 10,000.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product contracted by 3.8% in 2020, the smallest decline outside of the Atlantic bubble.
  • British Columbia experienced the strongest employment recovery of the country.
  • Employment in professional, scientific and technical services has risen by 36,500 since February 2020.
  • As of February 2021, British Columbia was the only province where the number of businesses operating in the business sector had surpassed  pre-COVID-19 levels.

Chart 4 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 4 
Data table for chart 4
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 4 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100)

units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)

Youth: male 69.1 103.7
Youth: female 58.2 85.4
Core-age: male 88.2 101.4
Core-age: female 85.8 100.5
Older: male 88.4 95.4
Older: female 90.4 97.6

Chart 5 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 5 
Data table for chart 5
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 5 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100
units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0000 100.0000 100.0000
March 94.1318 99.0246 95.3524
April 76.6762 85.2151 79.8161
May 88.0033 89.7940 85.1674
June 100.2905 94.8783 91.8977
July 102.4387 99.1258 98.6095
August 102.9570 104.0095 105.0231
September 105.9718 107.1838 107.5717
October 108.3845 109.7936 110.0727
November 108.8904 104.5243 111.4599
December 107.0707 111.1516 108.5270
January 111.7387 118.4276 117.6154
February 112.3201 120.1385 116.0457
March 111.1190 125.7395 119.5387

Chart 6 Percent change in active businesses, February 2020 to February 2021

Data table for Chart 6 
Data table for chart 6
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 6 Percent change (appearing as column headers).
Percent change
B.C. 0.51
P.E.I. -0.10
N.S. -0.90
Sask. -0.98
Que. -1.12
Man. -1.14
N.B. -1.68
Canada -1.95
Alta. -2.14
N.L. -4.44
Ont. -4.54

Alberta: Remains hardest hit by COVID-19 due to impacts on energy sector

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Economic growth stalled in 2019.
  • Declines in construction activity were offset by gains in real estate, healthcare and finance.
  • Total employment was little changed in 2019, as the province’s unemployment rate remained the highest in Western Canada.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Economic activity was hardest hit in Alberta due to the impact of COVID-19 on oil prices. Real GDP in the province contracted by 8.2% in 2020.
  • 2021 private capital intentions remain nearly 20% below pre-COVID-19 levels reported in 2019.
  • As of February 2021, the number of active businesses operating in Alberta was 2.1% below pre-COVID-19 levels, the largest net decline in Western Canada.

Chart 7 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 7 
Data table for chart 7
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 7 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 69.6 95.6
Youth: female 57.3 92.7
Core-age: male 88.8 100.1
Core-age: female 86.6 95.1
Older: male 92.5 96.3
Older: female 87.3 106.8

Chart 8 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 8 
Data table for chart 8
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 8 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 87.5 91.3 96.0
April 71.6 74.9 95.5
May 87.5 76.3 89.2
June 100.9 81.5 95.9
July 101.7 83.5 99.0
August 96.1 83.0 96.5
September 105.6 85.9 96.7
October 106.5 87.4 97.9
November 106.9 89.7 100.5
December 102.6 93.3 99.7
January 108.9 97.2 104.1
February 110.9 100.3 101.3
March 110.4 102.7 107.4

Chart 9 Petroleum and coal product manufacturing sales, February 2020 to March 2021, billions of dollars

Data table for Chart 9 
Data table for chart 9
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 9 Alberta, calculated using dollars units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Alberta
dollars
February 1,627,712,000
March 1,103,407,000
April 620,579,000
May 726,393,000
June 883,958,000
July 1,025,166,000
August 1,034,516,000
September 1,068,451,000
October 1,027,727,000
November 1,106,484,000
December 1,224,629,000
January 1,242,525,000
February 1,338,013,000
March 1,338,013,001

Saskatchewan: Second largest decline in economic activity since the onset of the pandemic due to stresses on resources and energy

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product declined by 0.9% in 2019.
  • Lower economic output reflected notable declines in non-metallic mining and quarrying, manufacturing and residential building construction.
  • Overall employment held steady in 2019 with gains in service industries offsetting lower employment in the goods sector.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product contracted by 5.2% in 2020. Experimental monthly estimates of economic activity point to relatively severe economic impacts since the onset of the pandemic.
  • Wholesale agricultural supplies & farm machinery sales were less impacted by economic disruptions due to COVID-19. As of March, Saskatchewan has the strongest recovery in wholesale sales of the Western provinces.
  • As of May, Saskatchewan has the strongest recovery in youth employment outside of the Atlantic bubble as the province avoids a third wave of restrictions.

Chart 10 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 10 
Data table for chart 10
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 10 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 76.5 100.5
Youth: female 73.3 103.6
Core-age: male 90.8 100.6
Core-age: female 88.3 99.2
Older: male 92.3 91.6
Older: female 83.8 92.6

Chart 11 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 11 
Data table for chart 11
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 11 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 89.3 93.3 107.1
April 78.0 79.4 110.4
May 91.7 83.6 100.3
June 102.6 84.1 109.6
July 102.6 90.9 109.2
August 102.9 91.1 109.5
September 102.6 87.7 104.1
October 103.5 93.2 113.4
November 103.2 93.4 118.3
December 103.2 99.6 114.3
January 105.9 105.7 116.6
February 106.4 109.3 121.2
March 107.1 120.9 121.2

Chart 12 Youth employment recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to May 2021, Western provinces

Data table for Chart 12 
Data table for chart 12
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 12 Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 85.9 90.2 81.1 84.1
April 67.2 75.0 63.4 63.7
May 74.2 73.1 69.8 66.6
June 86.8 87.8 80.9 79.6
July 87.0 93.9 83.9 88.0
August 90.8 93.7 83.8 86.7
September 92.1 99.0 87.6 88.2
October 93.9 97.8 90.9 89.9
November 83.7 95.3 89.8 92.7
December 79.8 91.6 84.1 90.5
January 82.1 93.0 88.2 93.3
February 89.7 94.6 90.2 97.5
March 94.6 97.0 95.0 104.2
April 95.8 97.8 93.0 96.5
May 95.7 101.8 94.1 94.5

Employment in Manitoba quickly rebounded as second-wave public health restrictions were eased

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real GDP growth slowed to 0.5% in 2019.
  • Increased output was led by gains in the service sector, including real estate and healthcare.
  • Manufacturing output fell as factory employment declined.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product contracted by 4.8% in 2020.
  • Following new restrictions in response to the second wave of COVID-19, employment fell sharply in late 2020. Employment has since rebounded as restrictions eased.
  • Retail sales fluctuated sharply as a result of second-wave restrictions, but has since recovered to have the strongest recovery of the Western provinces as of March.
  • Economic declines in Manitoba were generally in the mid-range compared to those in other provinces.

Chart 13 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 13 
Data table for chart 13
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 13 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 71.7 98.1
Youth: female 62.6 93.3
Core-age: male 90.1 98.9
Core-age: female 86.9 97.7
Older: male 92.9 99.6
Older: female 96.0 102.5

Chart 14 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 14 
Data table for chart 14
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 14 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 90.8 107.2 99.0
April 72.6 88.0 89.8
May 93.0 93.0 92.9
June 103.7 91.3 99.1
July 106.0 101.5 106.3
August 103.4 102.0 103.4
September 105.4 105.7 105.8
October 106.8 108.0 101.1
November 99.3 106.5 106.4
December 92.4 110.9 108.3
January 108.1 111.7 107.5
February 114.3 109.0 105.9
March 112.9 113.2 106.9

Chart 15 Employment recovery index, pre-COVID-19 to May, Western provinces

Data table for Chart 15 
Data table for chart 15
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 15 Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia, calculated using February 2020=100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Manitoba Saskatchewan Alberta British Columbia
February 2020=100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 96.0 96.2 95.4 94.9
April 86.4 87.4 85.1 84.5
May 88.4 87.7 86.3 86.0
June 92.9 92.4 90.3 90.7
July 94.9 95.2 93.2 93.2
August 95.9 95.6 93.7 93.5
September 98.2 97.2 95.3 95.7
October 98.1 97.0 96.4 97.2
November 95.3 96.3 95.8 98.3
December 94.2 95.2 95.2 98.3
January 95.0 95.6 96.1 98.4
February 97.4 96.0 96.9 99.4
March 98.4 96.0 98.5 100.8
April 98.9 97.6 98.0 99.1
May 98.4 98.4 97.9 99.0

Ontario: Extended lockdowns dampened the economic recovery in hard-hit sectors

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real GDP grew by 2.1% in 2019 driven by higher output in services industries.
  • Strong growth in professional, scientific and technical services as employment rose by 54,000.
  • Employment rose by over 250,000 in the services sector.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product contracted by 5.0% in 2020.
  • Employment levels in professional, scientific and technical industries has risen by more than 53,000 since February 2020
  • Private capital intentions in Ontario are at 95% of pre-COVID-19 levels reported in 2019, the highest level in the country.
  • As of February, Ontario has the lowest percentage of active businesses, relative to pre-COVID-19 levels, following second lockdown that resulted in sharp employment losses. Currently the province has the second lowest employment levels relative to those pre-pandemic, in the country.

Chart 16 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 16 
Data table for chart 16
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 16 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 70.2 86.3
Youth: female 64.4 77.9
Core-age: male 89.2 98.0
Core-age: female 87.5 98.6
Older: male 90.4 99.9
Older: female 86.4 94.3

Chart 17 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 17 
Data table for chart 17
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 17 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 91.9 86.0 95.3
April 63.6 53.8 66.3
May 75.5 64.1 72.7
June 99.9 90.1 93.6
July 99.8 101.2 98.1
August 99.4 96.1 98.4
September 101.2 97.0 99.4
October 101.6 97.0 100.8
November 104.8 95.9 101.1
December 98.0 95.1 101.2
January 96.2 98.6 103.5
February 99.6 93.8 102.7
March 108.6 96.5 103.0

Chart 18 Motor vehicle manufacturing sales, February 2020 to March 2021, billions of dollars

Data table for Chart 18 
Data table for chart 18
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 18 Motor vehicle manufacturing, calculated using dollars units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Motor vehicle manufacturing
dollars
February 4,454,977,000
March 2,869,437,000
April 562,000
May 956,264,000
June 3,761,624,000
July 5,003,648,000
August 4,367,404,000
September 4,243,350,000
October 4,261,516,000
November 3,985,447,000
December 4,021,641,000
January 3,627,101,000
February 3,074,183,000
March 3,410,652,000

Quebec: Second lockdown weighed on youth employment

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product rose by 2.7% in 2019.
  • Higher output reflected gains in manufacturing and services.
  • Employment rose by 66,000 in 2019, with over three-quarters of the increase in service industries.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Economic activity contracted by 5.3% in 2020.
  • Employment losses in April 2020 were relatively severe compared to other provinces.
  • The second lockdown had a strong impact on youth employment. As of May 2021, youth employment is at 90% of its pre-COVID-19 level.
  • Despite large declines during the lockdowns, retail sales as of March were nearly 15% above pre-COVID-19 levels.
  • Quebec has experienced the largest percentage increase in new housing prices of the provinces since the onset of the pandemic.

Chart 19 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 19 
Data table for chart 19
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 19 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 65.6 91.6
Youth: female 60.4 88.8
Core-age: male 84.4 98.6
Core-age: female 86.2 96.2
Older: male 78.4 102.6
Older: female 81.7 96.2

Chart 20 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 20 
Data table for chart 20
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 20 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 83.1 94.5 98.5
April 60.4 71.5 79.2
May 85.3 79.7 88.0
June 105.5 92.6 100.5
July 104.7 93.6 101.7
August 106.5 95.6 103.8
September 106.3 97.3 107.3
October 108.9 96.6 104.4
November 111.0 98.0 105.8
December 102.5 99.2 104.1
January 93.4 101.3 109.7
February 112.1 104.2 108.2
March 114.6 106.6 117.7

Chart 21 Youth employment recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to May 2021

Data table for Chart 21 
Data table for chart 21
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 21 Canada and Quebec, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Canada Quebec
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0
March 84.0 84.3
April 65.7 63.1
May 67.5 67.7
June 77.6 78.9
July 83.1 84.7
August 85.4 89.6
September 90.4 93.2
October 90.5 89.0
November 91.2 90.5
December 89.6 87.2
January 85.5 80.0
February 89.4 88.2
March 93.8 89.2
April 89.9 89.1
May 88.9 90.2

New Brunswick: Youth employment strengthens

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product grew by 1.1% in 2019.
  • Higher output was supported by gains in utilities and healthcare.
  • Declines in transportation, engineering construction and resource extraction tempered overall growth.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real GDP declined by 3.7% in 2020.
  • As of March, the province experienced the second strongest manufacturing recovery in Atlantic Canada, as non-durables rebounded.
  • As of May 2021, New Brunswick is one of only three provinces with youth employment above pre-COVID-19 levels, narrowly behind Newfoundland and Labrador.

Chart 22 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 22 
Data table for chart 22
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 22 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 74.5 102.7
Youth: female 73.3 108.0
Core-age: male 89.4 95.5
Core-age: female 85.3 99.7
Older: male 87.9 101.5
Older: female 92.9 95.0

Chart 23 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 23 
Data table for chart 23
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 23 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 88.8 79.3 98.7
April 73.3 64.5 79.0
May 91.3 66.9 85.0
June 102.5 80.2 103.6
July 102.1 86.8 100.1
August 102.2 85.5 105.3
September 107.0 95.4 102.7
October 102.0 102.8 104.9
November 104.9 107.4 107.9
December 99.1 110.7 105.4
January 106.4 117.2 112.2
February 106.2 111.9 112.4
March 106.6 119.7 112.0

Chart 24 Non-durable manufacturing sales, February 2020 to March 2021, billions of dollars

Data table for Chart 24 
Data table for chart 24
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 24 Non-durable goods, calculated using dollars units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Non-durable goods
dollars
February 1,149,327,000
March 876,332,000
April 683,617,000
May 702,965,000
June 857,193,000
July 940,760,000
August 896,631,000
September 1,008,058,000
October 1,121,850,000
November 1,186,762,000
December 1,224,745,000
January 1,242,022,000
February 1,168,062,000
March 1,275,101,000

Nova Scotia: Late April restrictions halt employment recovery

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Economy advanced by 2.5% in 2019, reflecting broad-based gains among services, led by real estate and healthcare.
  • Higher manufacturing output reflected increases in shipbuilding.
  • Employment gains largely reflected increases in healthcare and manufacturing.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Economic activity declined by 3.2% in 2020.
  • In April 2021, Nova Scotia has experienced the strongest employment recovery in the country, reflecting increases in professional, scientific and technical services, and educational services.
  • Third wave COVID-19 restrictions imposed in late April caused employment to decline by 4.8% in May, as the recovery in total employment slowed to the lowest of all provinces.
  • The province also experienced the strongest recovery in manufacturing and wholesale trade sales in Canada, as of March.

Chart 25 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 25 
Data table for chart 25
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 25 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 63.4 79.3
Youth: female 61.7 85.5
Core-age: male 88.9 95.7
Core-age: female 86.5 97.5
Older: male 92.4 105.2
Older: female 82.4 92.0

Chart 26 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 26 
Data table for chart 26
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 26 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 89.1 103.1 98.6
April 69.2 93.2 79.8
May 84.8 85.8 97.9
June 101.1 102.0 106.0
July 99.8 99.9 110.1
August 104.1 100.6 114.1
September 103.3 113.1 109.1
October 106.3 108.3 114.0
November 108.1 101.8 114.7
December 101.0 106.5 119.4
January 110.1 110.0 125.1
February 114.4 106.3 127.0
March 115.6 132.2 131.5

Chart 27 Employment recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to May 2021, Atlantic provinces

Data table for Chart 27 
Data table for chart 27
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 27 Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, calculated using February 2020 = 100
units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick
February 2020 = 100
February 100.00000 100.00000 100.00000 100.00000
March 97.23461 96.08802 94.38972 95.51177
April 84.52275 85.45232 83.94004 86.28900
May 87.91258 88.38631 85.73876 90.72250
June 89.47368 90.95355 91.39186 97.07170
July 92.41748 92.29829 92.50535 96.63383
August 94.95986 94.62103 93.70450 96.49699
September 96.96699 93.03178 95.93148 96.96223
October 99.68778 94.25428 96.68094 97.83799
November 101.02587 95.59902 99.07923 98.93268
December 100.26762 94.74328 97.40899 98.71374
January 99.06334 95.84352 99.07923 99.01478
February 92.37288 95.23227 99.61456 98.30323
March 98.34969 96.82152 99.95717 98.41270
April 97.81445 96.45477 99.76445 99.53476
May 96.87779 96.82152 95.01071 98.79584

Prince Edward Island: Largest Atlantic increase in new housing prices since the onset of the pandemic

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product rose by 5.1% in 2019—the largest increase among the provinces.
  • Higher output reflected increases in residential building construction and agriculture, along with broad-based gains among services.
  • The employment rate was 61.9% at the end of 2019, 0.2 percentage points above the national average.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product declined by 3.0% in 2020, the smallest decrease among the provinces.
  • The employment recovery in PEI has been slower than elsewhere in Atlantic Canada.
  • PEI has experienced the largest percentage increase in new housing prices of the Atlantic provinces since the onset of the pandemic.
  • As of February 2021, the number of active businesses in PEI had reached pre-COVID-19 levels, the strongest net recovery in Atlantic Canada.

Chart 28 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 28 
Data table for chart 28
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 28 Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) and Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021), calculated using index (February 2020=100) units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Indexed employment level during COVID-19 economic shutdown (April 2020) Indexed employment level during current reference month (May 2021)
index (February 2020=100)
Youth: male 72.5 92.8
Youth: female 67.2 89.1
Core-age: male 90.3 100.8
Core-age: female 86.1 96.3
Older: male 95.3 101.9
Older: female 82.3 89.6

Chart 29 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 29 
Data table for chart 29
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 29 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 87.2 92.6 121.8
April 73.7 83.7 101.3
May 90.0 82.1 77.3
June 103.1 82.3 97.8
July 96.2 75.1 103.1
August 102.6 76.5 108.9
September 107.5 86.5 112.6
October 109.5 91.5 107.4
November 112.2 89.4 110.7
December 104.1 93.4 122.5
January 115.3 85.1 134.3
February 119.8 88.3 125.4
March 119.5 93.9 127.0

Chart 30 New housing price index, pre-COVID-19 levels to April 2021, Atlantic provinces

Data table for Chart 30 
Data table for chart 30
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 30 Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Newfoundland and Labrador Prince Edward Island Nova Scotia New Brunswick
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 99.8 100.0 100.2 100.3
April 99.8 100.0 100.3 100.5
May 99.8 100.6 100.8 100.5
June 99.8 100.6 101.3 100.5
July 99.5 100.6 101.7 100.5
August 99.5 100.6 103.4 100.5
September 100.6 102.6 104.2 101.5
October 102.7 102.6 105.5 101.5
November 103.2 104.4 106.3 101.5
December 103.4 104.4 106.3 101.5
January 103.4 107.8 106.3 101.5
February 103.4 108.0 108.8 102.7
March 104.2 111.7 109.8 105.6
April 104.8 112.9 112.0 107.3

Newfoundland and Labrador: Youth employment rebounds while the recovery in manufacturing and active businesses lags

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Newfoundland and Labrador’s economy grew by 4.0% in 2019, reflecting increases in oil and gas extraction and construction.
  • Despite higher output, total employment edged down in 2019, as the employment rate ended the year at 50.0%.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Real gross domestic product fell by 5.3% in 2020.
  • The recovery in youth employment was among the strongest in the country.
  • The recovery in manufacturing sales lags that in the rest of the country, as does the recovery in the number of active businesses.

Chart 31 Employment, expressed as a percentage of pre-COVID-19 levels, by age group and sex

Data table for Chart 31 [an error occurred while processing this directive]

Chart 32 Sales recovery index, pre-COVID-19 levels to March 2021

Data table for Chart 32 
Data table for chart 32
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 32 Retail trade, Manufacturing and Wholesale trade, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Retail trade Manufacturing Wholesale trade
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 98.8 70.5 97.7
April 74.6 38.4 76.2
May 92.8 46.2 84.3
June 109.1 51.9 90.5
July 103.8 58.0 100.2
August 103.6 55.1 98.1
September 102.7 58.7 99.6
October 102.3 43.5 102.9
November 111.1 51.5 104.3
December 100.8 67.6 100.9
January 112.8 52.8 104.9
February 103.5 68.7 107.9
March 112.3 69.1 116.0

Chart 33 Youth employment recovery, May 2021

Data table for Chart 33 
Data table for chart 33
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 33. The information is grouped by Province (appearing as row headers), Youth Employment Recovery (appearing as column headers).
Province Youth Employment Recovery
N.L. 105.9
N.B. 105.2
Sask. 101.8
Man. 95.7
B.C. 94.5
Alta. 94.1
P.E.I. 91.0
Que. 90.2
Canada 88.9
N.S. 82.2
Ont. 82.1

The territories: Impacts of resource extraction vary as businesses remain resilient

Pre-COVID-19:

  • Yukon‘s real gross domestic product grew by 0.7% in 2019, as gains from real estate and other services offset lower wholesale activity.
  • Real GDP in the Northwest Territories contracted by 8.1% in 2019 due to sharp declines mining and engineering construction.
  • Nunavut’s economy grew for the fourth consecutive year, as real GDP rose by 6.5% on the strength of higher mining output.

Post-COVID-19:

  • Businesses remained resilient—as of February 2021, the number of active businesses in Yukon and Nunavut exceeded pre-COVID-19 levels, while the number operating in the Northwest Territories was 1% below levels reported in February 2020.
  • Public and private capital intentions for 2021, at $2.5 billion, are 9% higher than spending levels in 2020, but still down about 13% from pre-COVID-19 levels reported in 2019.
  • Employment in the North was less impacted by the initial economic shutdowns. As of May 2021, employment in the Northwest Territories was above pre-COVID-19 levels. Employment levels in the Yukon have remained stable, while levels in Nunavut have shown signs of recovery.

Chart 34 Percent change in active businesses, territories, February 2020 to February 2021

Data table for Chart 34 
Data table for chart 34
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 34 Percent change (appearing as column headers).
Percent change
Yukon 1.0
Nunavut 0.6
Northwest Territories -1.3
Canada -2.0

Chart 35 Employment recovery index, pre-COVID-19 to May 2021, territories

Data table for Chart 35 
Data table for chart 35
Table summary
This table displays the results of Data table for chart 35 Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut, calculated using February 2020 = 100 units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Yukon Northwest Territories Nunavut
February 2020 = 100
February 100.0 100.0 100.0
March 99.6 100.0 100.8
April 97.8 96.9 91.4
May 93.9 96.9 85.9
June 92.1 93.8 85.9
July 92.1 93.3 92.2
August 91.7 92.0 94.5
September 91.7 92.9 95.3
October 93.4 96.0 96.1
November 96.5 99.1 96.1
December 96.5 100.9 95.3
January 95.6 101.8 94.5
February 96.5 102.7 95.3
March 97.4 104.0 95.3
April 97.8 104.5 94.5
May 96.5 106.7 93.0
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