Lung Cancer in Canada, 2000 to 2016

Release date: June 3, 2019
Lung Cancer in Canada, 2000 to 2016
Description: Lung Cancer in Canada, 2000 to 2016

Lung Cancer in Canada, 2000 to 2016

Incidence

Lung cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers: 12% of new cancer cases in 2016.

New Diagnosed Cases

  • 2000: 13,820
  • 2016: 17,755
New diagnosed cases for males and females for the years 2000 and 2016
2000 2016
Males 56% 50%
Females 44% 50%

Stage at diagnosis

Compared to males, females are more likely to be diagnosed at stage 1 when the cancer has not spread.

About half of all lung cancer cases are diagnosed at stage 4 when the cancer has spread.

Percentage of lung cancer cases by sex and stage, 2011 to 2015 (91,645 cases)
Stage Females Males
1 25 19
2 9 9
3 19 20
4 46 50

Stages of cancer

Stage 1: Tumour is small and contained within the organ in which it started.

Stage 2: Tumour is larger and may have begun to spread.

Stage 3: Tumour is large and has spread into nearby tissues and lymph nodes.

Stage 4: Cancer has spread through the blood or lymphatic system to distant sites in the body.

Mortality

Deaths Attributed to Lung Cancer

  • 2000: 16,145 deaths attributed to lung cancer.
  • 2016: 20,080 deaths attributed to lung cancer.
Deaths attributed to lung cancer for males and females in the years 2000 and 2016
2000 2016
Males 60% 52%
Females 40% 48%

Survival

Females are about 40% more likely than males to survive over a period of five years after being diagnosed with lung cancer.

Notes:

  • All estimates include both bronchus and lung cancer.
  • Cancer incidence, stage and survival data exclude Quebec, as data for Quebec are not available in the Canadian Cancer Registry for 2011 to 2016.
  • Cancer stage data are restricted to people diagnosed at ages 18 to 79 and are for the combined 2011-2015 period.

Sources: Statistics Canada, Canadian Cancer Registry and Canadian Vital Statistics Death Database.

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