Off-reserve First Nations people entering the labour force: Findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

Release date: November 26, 2018 Correction date: November 27, 2018

Correction Notice

Conflicting statistics on the share of First Nations women who plan to enter the labour force that reported child care assistance would help them find work were corrected to contain the correct number.

The text was incorrect, while the associated image contained the correct data. As such the text was amended to read "Among women entering the labour force aged 25-54, 28% reported that child care assistance would help them find work".

Infographic: Off-reserve First Nations people entering the labour force: Findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey
Description: Off-reserve First Nations people entering the labour force: Findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

Off-reserve First Nations people entering the labour force: Findings from the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey

According to the 2017 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, 267,850 First Nations people aged 15 or older and living off reserve were employed.

Of those that were employed;

  • 20% were 15-24
  • 65% were 25-54
  • 15% were 55 or older
  • 47% were men
  • 53% were women

In 2017, there were 177,740 First Nations people living off reserve who were not currently working or actively looking for work, that is, they were not in the labour force.

Possible reasons people are not in the labour force

  • Going to school
  • Taking care of children
  • Retired
  • Illness or disability

When asked about plans to enter the labour force, 58,040 said they planned to look for work in the next 12 months.

Of those planning on entering the labour force:

  • 51% were 15-24
  • 39% were 25-54
  • 10% were 55 or older
  • 41% were men
  • 59% were women

Among youth entering the labour force aged 15 to 24, résumé writing skills (23%) and work experience (22%) were identified as most helpful.

Among women entering the labour force aged 25 to 54, 28% reported that child care assistance would help them find work.

When asked what would help them find work, the top ten most common responses were:

  • More education – 29%
  • Skills training – 25%
  • More jobs/work available – 19%
  • Work experience – 17%
  • Résumé writing skills – 16%
  • Better health – 16%
  • Contacts or networking – 14%
  • Job finding clubs – 13%
  • Transportation – 12%
  • Child care assistance – 12%

Source: Aboriginal Peoples Survey, 2017

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