Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026572
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table is an assembly of some of the most important statistics on the new economy.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002009
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commence and Technology (SECT) and explores organizational and technological changes in the domestic private sector between 1998 and 2000. The discussion contrasts the adoption rates of goods producing industries with service producing industries. The text also discusses the impact of employment size on adoption rates within these two sectors.

    Information includes rates for training, subsequent to the introduction of organizational or technological change, followed by the type of technological change. Finally, data are broken down by major industrial group, within the goods producing and services producing sectors.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026372
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The public sector is often considered staid and unchanging. Based on recent findings, this perception may need to be updated. Four-fifths of Canadian public sector organizations introduced significantly improved organizational structures or management techniques between 1998 and 2000. This rate of introducing organizational change is twice that recorded by the private sector (38%). The public sector also led the private sector overall in the introduction of significantly improved technologies (85% versus 44%).

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002001
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see Appendix for more details on the survey) and concentrates on the introduction of organisational and technological change in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made to the rates of introduction of organisational and technological change in the private sector. Rates of organisational and technological change in the public sector by employment size groups are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a look at these changes in the public sector based on industrial classification.

    Release date: 2002-01-31
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Articles and reports (11)

Articles and reports (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2009004
    Description:

    This paper provides an analysis of technological change within the Canadian economy based on data from the 2006 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology where firms indicated how they introduced significantly improved technologies. The paper explores differences in the use of methods of introduction of significantly improved technologies by firm/organization size and by industry in both the private and public sectors.

    The paper begins with a brief presentation of previous work carried out on technology introduction. The methodology is described. A description of concepts used in the analysis will follow. Analytic results examining technological change in the private sector overall, by industry and by size, and the public sector overall, by industry and by size are presented. A comparison of technological change in the private and public sectors follows. The paper concludes with a discussion of analytic results and further analytic work that could be undertaken.

    Release date: 2009-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2006010
    Description:

    It is well-known that small firms are managed differently from large firms, and this paper provides further evidence in support of this idea while suggesting that some small firms are adopting management behaviours of larger firms. Could these small firms be positioning themselves for growth or using organisational innovation as a tool for survival or adopting some formal organization practices early? In 2004, the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology provided a list of eight management practices that according to interviews with small and medium-sized firms indicated potential firm growth. The management practices listed were organisational structures; employee feedback surveys; mentoring or coaching programs; and written strategies for marketing; managing growth; commercialisation of intellectual property; succession management; and risk management.

    Release date: 2006-10-02

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004010
    Description:

    This paper analyses data from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology 2002 that looks at the acquisition of significantly improved technologies and the introduction of new or significantly improved products to the market. The target groups are technological innovators (firms that acquired new technologies and/or sold new products), and non-innovators (firms that neither acquired new technologies nor sold new products). A series of profiles is presented of information communication technology (ICT) use as well as barriers to its use for technological innovators and non-innovators.

    Release date: 2004-05-21

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004007
    Description:

    This paper presents data on technological change that have been made comparable from the Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) for 2000 and 2002. It shows that when comparable data for the 1998 to 2000 and 2000 to 2002 periods (based on the definition and survey universe employed by SECT 2000) are used, the propensity to adopt new technologies in the private sector has remained constant at about 40%. The rate of technology adoption in the public sector remained at four out of five organizations introducing significantly improved technologies (a level about twice as high as that for the private sector). This rate also shows little change from 2000. The paper presents the comparable technological change data, while explaining differences in the wording of the survey questions and universe between the two reference years. Information is provided for private and public sectors, selected employment size groups and sectors of both private and public sectors.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004008
    Description:

    For 2002, the rate of technology adoption in the public sector stood at close to double that of the private sector: 82% versus 42%. Quite obviously, not all turn-of-the-century technological change within the public sector was directly linked to the Year 2000 phenomena. Rather, public sector organizations appear to refresh their technologies on a continual basis. It also appears that the public sector remains committed to supporting the acquisition of significantly improved technologies through training.

    This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made with the private sector, with special attention given to employment size groups. The paper outlines the methods employed to acquire new technologies. It also provides an overview of three sectors within the public sector: educational services, health care and social services, and public administration.

    Release date: 2004-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2004001
    Description:

    Technological changes are occurring at home, work and play. In the workplace, change occurs in how business is conducted, its production processes and office procedures and much of this change is related to the introduction of new or significantly improved technologies. This paper is based on information from the 2002 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see the Appendix) and concentrates on the acquisition of significantly improved technologies in the private sector. The private sector and its two major subsectors, the goods producing and services producing sectors, are presented by employment-size groups. The technological change rates by major sector are also provided.

    Technological change in the workplace includes the seemingly simple purchases of off-the-shelf technologies such as accounting software; colour printers with double-sided printing and facsimile capabilities; and sophisticated medical diagnostic machines and equipment. Acquisition of new or significantly improved technologies is not limited to purchases, but also includes leasing and licensing as well as customizing and developing technologies. Another technology acquisition method, which could incorporate all of the other technology acquisition methods, is 'putting into place an improved production facility' by, for example, retro-fitting pulp and paper mills. At the turn of the new century, the Canadian private sector is not resisting the lure of change - 4 out of 10 private sector firms introduced technological change from 2000 to 2002.

    Release date: 2004-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030026572
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This table is an assembly of some of the most important statistics on the new economy.

    Release date: 2003-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002009
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commence and Technology (SECT) and explores organizational and technological changes in the domestic private sector between 1998 and 2000. The discussion contrasts the adoption rates of goods producing industries with service producing industries. The text also discusses the impact of employment size on adoption rates within these two sectors.

    Information includes rates for training, subsequent to the introduction of organizational or technological change, followed by the type of technological change. Finally, data are broken down by major industrial group, within the goods producing and services producing sectors.

    Release date: 2002-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020026372
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The public sector is often considered staid and unchanging. Based on recent findings, this perception may need to be updated. Four-fifths of Canadian public sector organizations introduced significantly improved organizational structures or management techniques between 1998 and 2000. This rate of introducing organizational change is twice that recorded by the private sector (38%). The public sector also led the private sector overall in the introduction of significantly improved technologies (85% versus 44%).

    Release date: 2002-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2002001
    Description:

    This paper is based on information from the 2000 Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology (SECT) (see Appendix for more details on the survey) and concentrates on the introduction of organisational and technological change in the public sector. To provide context, comparisons are made to the rates of introduction of organisational and technological change in the private sector. Rates of organisational and technological change in the public sector by employment size groups are presented. Finally, the paper concludes with a look at these changes in the public sector based on industrial classification.

    Release date: 2002-01-31
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