Analysis

COVID-19 A data perspective

COVID-19: A data perspective: Explore key economic trends and social challenges that arise as the COVID-19 situation evolves.

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All (26)

All (26) (0 to 10 of 26 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • 2. Baby boom women Archived
    Stats in brief: 75-001-X19940041563
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of the employment characteristics of women born in the early years of the baby boom with those of women born in the later years.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study attempts to compare the earnings of men and women on an equal footing by concentrating on recent postsecondary graduates and using survey data on a number of earnings-related characteristics. The data cover three graduating classes of university and community college students: 1982, 1986 and 1990. These data indicate that the gender earnings gap among graduates has narrowed in recent years. In fact among the most recent class, we found that female university graduates are rewarded slightly better than their male counterparts after controlling for experience, job tenure, education and hours of work. A small gender gap persists among community college graduates: about three-and-a-half percent on an hourly wage basis. For all graduates, the earnings gap tended to increase with age, even after controlling for previous work experience.

    Release date: 1994-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment equity legislation is becoming more prevalent in Canadian labour markets, yet -- other than broad availability numbers -- the labour market experiencesof designated groups have not been well documented. Using the National Graduates Survey of 1992, this report profiles the early labour market experiences ofvisible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities who graduated from Canadian universities and community colleges in 1990. In general, we find thatthe earnings of designated group members are very similar to the earnings of their classmates. However, we also find that members of these groups are more likely tobe unemployed and are less likely to participate in the labour force than others in their class.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The "standard" five-day week averaging 37 to 40 hours of work has prevailed since the 1960s. The study explores the evolution of the standard work week from the beginning of this century until now.

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • 9. Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1975 and 1993, part-time jobs grew much faster than full-time jobs. The article examines the labour market by looking at jobs rather than workers

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003155
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Having a second job is a growing phenomenon. Who are moonlighters and why do they moonlight? The characteristics of moonlighters and the work patterns of their second jobs are discussed.

    Release date: 1994-09-06
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

  • 1. Baby boom women Archived
    Stats in brief: 75-001-X19940041563
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A comparison of the employment characteristics of women born in the early years of the baby boom with those of women born in the later years.

    Release date: 1994-12-14
Articles and reports (25)

Articles and reports (25) (0 to 10 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041562
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    David Foot on the baby boom generation's influence on current and future forms of organizational structure in North America.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19940041582
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    An overview of the changing industrial structure in the census metropolitan areas of Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver since 1971.

    Release date: 1994-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994068
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study attempts to compare the earnings of men and women on an equal footing by concentrating on recent postsecondary graduates and using survey data on a number of earnings-related characteristics. The data cover three graduating classes of university and community college students: 1982, 1986 and 1990. These data indicate that the gender earnings gap among graduates has narrowed in recent years. In fact among the most recent class, we found that female university graduates are rewarded slightly better than their male counterparts after controlling for experience, job tenure, education and hours of work. A small gender gap persists among community college graduates: about three-and-a-half percent on an hourly wage basis. For all graduates, the earnings gap tended to increase with age, even after controlling for previous work experience.

    Release date: 1994-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994069
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Employment equity legislation is becoming more prevalent in Canadian labour markets, yet -- other than broad availability numbers -- the labour market experiencesof designated groups have not been well documented. Using the National Graduates Survey of 1992, this report profiles the early labour market experiences ofvisible minorities, Aboriginal peoples and persons with disabilities who graduated from Canadian universities and community colleges in 1990. In general, we find thatthe earnings of designated group members are very similar to the earnings of their classmates. However, we also find that members of these groups are more likely tobe unemployed and are less likely to participate in the labour force than others in their class.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994070
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper uses job turnover data to compare how job creation, job destruction and net job change differ for small and large establishments in the Canadian manufacturing sector. It uses several different techniques to correct for the regression-to-the-mean problem that, it has been suggested, might incorrectly lead to the conclusion that small establishments create a disproportionate number of new jobs. It finds that net job creation for smaller establishments is greater than that of large establishments after such changes are made. The paper also compares the importance of small and large establishments in the manufacturing sectors of Canada and the United States. The Canadian manufacturing sector is shown to have both a larger proportion of employment in smaller establishments but also to have a small establishment sector that is growing in importance relative to that of the United States.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M1994071
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The statistical observation that small firms have created the majority of new jobs during the 1980s has had a tremendous influence on public policy. Governmentshave looked to the small firm sector for employment growth, and have promoted policies to augment this expansion. However, recent research in the US suggeststhat net job creation in the small firm sector may have been overestimated, relative to that in large firms. This paper addresses various measurement issues raised inthe recent research, and uses a very unique Canadian longitudinal data set that encompasses all companies in the Canadian economy to reassess the issue of jobcreation by firm size. We conclude that over the 1978-92 period, for both the entire Canadian economy and the manufacturing sector, the growth rate of (net)employment decreases monotonically as the size of firm increases, no matter which method of sizing firms is used. The small firm sector has accounted for adisproportionate share of both gross job gains and job losses, and in that aggregate, accounted for a disproportionate share of the employment increase over theperiod. Measurement does matter, however, as the magnitude of the difference in the growth rates of small and large firms is very sensitive to the measurementapproaches used. The paper also produces results for various industrial sectors, asks whether the more rapid growth in industries with a high proportion of smallfirms is responsible for the findings at the all-economy level, and examines employment growth in existing small and large firms (ie excluding births). It is found thatemployment growth in the population of existing small and large firms is very similar.

    Release date: 1994-11-16

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400311
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The "standard" five-day week averaging 37 to 40 hours of work has prevailed since the 1960s. The study explores the evolution of the standard work week from the beginning of this century until now.

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • 8. Jobs! Jobs! Jobs! Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003127
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1975 and 1993, part-time jobs grew much faster than full-time jobs. The article examines the labour market by looking at jobs rather than workers

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X1994003155
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Having a second job is a growing phenomenon. Who are moonlighters and why do they moonlight? The characteristics of moonlighters and the work patterns of their second jobs are discussed.

    Release date: 1994-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X199400340
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    An examination of the characteristics of workers who accept part-time employment because they are unable to find full-time work.

    Release date: 1994-09-06
Journals and periodicals (0)

Journals and periodicals (0) (0 results)

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