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All (5)

All (5) ((5 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202300900001
    Description: Cybervictimization has emerged as a potentially serious form of victimization and has been associated with negative mental health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, disordered eating, and suicidality. However, very little research has examined the prevalence and correlates of cybervictimization among diverse subpopulations of youth. Using data from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth, this study describes the proportion of Canadian adolescents who have experienced cybervictimization and how this proportion may differ among subpopulations of Canadian adolescents (based on gender identity, ethnicity, and sexual orientation). This study also examines how these sociodemographic predictors are associated with the experience of cybervictimization and associations between cybervictimization and adolescent mental health and whether these associations differ among subpopulations.
    Release date: 2023-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202300200002
    Description: Online digital media are a central part of adolescents’ lives, providing opportunities for social connection. However, some research has suggested that online digital media use may be negatively associated with mental health. Using data from 13,600 adolescents aged 12-17 drawn from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth, the purpose of the present study was to examine differential associations between different types of online digital media use and mental health among Canadian adolescents.
    Release date: 2023-02-15

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2022018
    Description:

    This infographic visually presents information on the proportion of children aged 1-17 in Canada who have experienced the separation or divorce of their parents, and shows estimates by province and child’s age. It additionally presents information on children’s living arrangements and contact with the non-resident parent after a parental divorce or separation. This infographic is based on data from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth (CHSCY).

    Release date: 2022-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100003
    Description:

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadian and American parents of young children have faced unique stressors, such as additional homeschooling and caregiving responsibilities, and families in both countries have experienced pandemic-related deteriorations to mental health (Gadermann et al., 2021). This paper examines the parenting concerns of parents of young children in the U.S. and Canada during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic based on data from Statistics Canada’s Parenting during the Pandemic crowdsource survey and the University of Oregon’s Rapid Assessment of Pandemic Impact on Development – Early Childhood (RAPID-EC) survey, and explores contextual factors that might explain the similarities and differences between Canadian and American parents’ pandemic experiences.

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100800004
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, there has been a growing demand for non-parental child care services, in part due to a rise in dual earner families and single parent households who may require care while working or studying. Previous work has described the use of child care for pre-school aged children in Canada and other high-income countries. However, much less information is available to describe the use of child care for school-aged children. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to describe the use of non-parental child care for kindergarten and elementary school children (age 4 to 11), including type of care and number of hours in care, as well as to identify predictors and correlates of child care use for this demographic.

    Release date: 2021-08-25
Stats in brief (1)

Stats in brief (1) ((1 result))

Articles and reports (4)

Articles and reports (4) ((4 results))

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202300900001
    Description: Cybervictimization has emerged as a potentially serious form of victimization and has been associated with negative mental health outcomes, including depression, anxiety, disordered eating, and suicidality. However, very little research has examined the prevalence and correlates of cybervictimization among diverse subpopulations of youth. Using data from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth, this study describes the proportion of Canadian adolescents who have experienced cybervictimization and how this proportion may differ among subpopulations of Canadian adolescents (based on gender identity, ethnicity, and sexual orientation). This study also examines how these sociodemographic predictors are associated with the experience of cybervictimization and associations between cybervictimization and adolescent mental health and whether these associations differ among subpopulations.
    Release date: 2023-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X202300200002
    Description: Online digital media are a central part of adolescents’ lives, providing opportunities for social connection. However, some research has suggested that online digital media use may be negatively associated with mental health. Using data from 13,600 adolescents aged 12-17 drawn from the 2019 Canadian Health Survey on Children and Youth, the purpose of the present study was to examine differential associations between different types of online digital media use and mental health among Canadian adolescents.
    Release date: 2023-02-15

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202200100003
    Description:

    As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Canadian and American parents of young children have faced unique stressors, such as additional homeschooling and caregiving responsibilities, and families in both countries have experienced pandemic-related deteriorations to mental health (Gadermann et al., 2021). This paper examines the parenting concerns of parents of young children in the U.S. and Canada during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic based on data from Statistics Canada’s Parenting during the Pandemic crowdsource survey and the University of Oregon’s Rapid Assessment of Pandemic Impact on Development – Early Childhood (RAPID-EC) survey, and explores contextual factors that might explain the similarities and differences between Canadian and American parents’ pandemic experiences.

    Release date: 2022-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 36-28-0001202100800004
    Description:

    Over the past several decades, there has been a growing demand for non-parental child care services, in part due to a rise in dual earner families and single parent households who may require care while working or studying. Previous work has described the use of child care for pre-school aged children in Canada and other high-income countries. However, much less information is available to describe the use of child care for school-aged children. Thus, the purpose of the current study is to describe the use of non-parental child care for kindergarten and elementary school children (age 4 to 11), including type of care and number of hours in care, as well as to identify predictors and correlates of child care use for this demographic.

    Release date: 2021-08-25
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