Human resources in science and technology

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  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114643
    Description:

    This article provides information on women aged 25 to 64 in natural and applied science occupations in Canada (i.e. scientific occupations), using data from the 1991 and 2001 censuses and the 2011 National Household Survey (NHS). The employment conditions of men and women in these occupations are also examined, based on data from the Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2016-06-24

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X201100111392
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2011-02-02

  • Journals and periodicals: 88-222-X
    Description:

    This annual publication is based on the Survey of Intellectual Property Commercialization in the Higher Education Sector which tracks the progress of innovation in this area.

    The objective of the survey is to assure the availability of pertinent information to monitor science and technology related activities and to support the development of science and technology policy. The topic studied is intellectual property management at universities and affiliated teaching hospitals. The data are used to determine how to maximize the benefits resulting from public sector research. Data users include the federal and provincial governments and university administrators and researchers.

    Release date: 2010-08-23

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X201000111032
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2010-02-11

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200900310877
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2009-06-04

  • Stats in brief: 88-001-X200800110603
    Description:

    Canada's economic competitiveness depends on scientific and technological development and also on the people responsible for this development, especially those engaged in R&D. In an earlier Science statistics bulletin, we published the gross domestic expenditures on R&D in Canada (GERD). This issue presents a supplementary measure to the GERD, the number of personnel who perform Canada's R&D activities.

    Release date: 2008-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2008017
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines the growth of human capital in Canadian and U.S. cities. Using pooled Census of Population data for 242 urban centres, we evaluate the link between long run employment growth and the supply of different types of skilled labour. The paper also examines whether the scientific capabilities of cities are influenced by amenities such as the size of the local cultural sector.

    The first part of the paper investigates the contribution of broad and specialized forms of human capital to long-run employment growth. We differentiate between employed degree holders (a general measure of human capital) and degree holders employed in science and cultural occupations (specific measures of human capital). Our growth models investigate long-run changes in urban employment from 1980 to 2000, and control for other factors that have been posited to influence the growth of cities. These include estimates of the amenities that proxy differences in the attractiveness of urban areas.

    The second part of the paper focuses specifically on a particular type of human capital'degree holders in science and engineering occupations. Our models evaluate the factors associated with the medium- and long-run growth of these occupations. Particular attention is placed on disentangling the relationships between science and engineering growth and other forms of human capital.

    Release date: 2008-01-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2007063
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This study profiles scientists and engineers with doctorates at the beginning of the millennium. Using data from the 2001 Census, it analyzes the geographical distribution of this important Canadian workforce, together with the industrial sector where they work and their earnings.

    Release date: 2007-10-24

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X200700210331
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Highly qualified human resources in science and technology are vital for innovation and economic growth. Both are dependent on the stock of human capital which supplies the labour market with highly skilled workers and helps in the diffusion of advanced knowledge. This article profiles Canada's highly qualified personnel based on immigrant status and place of birth, field of study, and selected demographic and employment characteristics.

    Release date: 2007-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 88F0006X2007002
    Description:

    PhDs are an important and vital asset in Canada's labour force because not only do they represent the highest educational attainment level in a knowledge-based economy, but they are also highly skilled industrial researchers and innovators, teachers and professors, along with being scientists and engineers. The study examines what industries are employing scientists and engineers and in what occupations, along with other labour market characteristics such as income and unemployment, age, gender and geographic location. The report also examines the differences between Canadian born and non-Canadian born scientists and engineers.

    Release date: 2007-04-16
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  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5193
    Description: Research and Development (R&D) personnel data are essential to assure the availability of pertinent statistical information to monitor science and technology (S&T) related activities in Canada and to support the development of science and technology policy.
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