Income inequality

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All (54) (0 to 10 of 54 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016024143
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020022
    Description:

    This infographic examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada.

    Release date: 2020-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019065
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this infographic highlights the gender wage gap and its sources in 2018.

    Release date: 2019-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 45-20-00022019001
    Description:

    Reducing pay inequality between women and men is a key priority, both nationally and internationally, for achieving gender equality. Documenting gender inequality in pay and tracking progress in this regard for policy purposes requires at least one indicator. The adjusted gender pay gap-the raw difference between the employment earnings of women and men, expressed either as a proportion of men's earnings (i.e., the "gender pay ratio") or one minus the gender pay ratio-typically serves this purpose. At present, there are no internationally-recognized standards for measuring the adjusted gender pay gap, leaving considerable scope for political choice.

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of international standards for measuring the adjusted gender pay gap by explaining the assumptions underlying, and the implications following from, various methods. Additionally, the paper strives to increase literacy about the meaning and interpretation of different estimates of the gender pay gap, and to bring together various explanations for the gender pay gap.

    Release date: 2019-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2018002
    Description:

    This profile article is the first main release by Statistics Canada based on findings from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability. It is divided into three sections - demographics, employment, and income - and provides a general snapshot on persons with disabilities to inform on emerging government priorities (such as Opportunity for All: Canada's First Poverty Reduction Strategy; Government of Canada, 2018) and community interest in the areas of disability prevalence, labour market participation, and income inequality.

    Release date: 2018-11-28

  • Table: 11-10-0037-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 109-0014)
    Frequency: Every 5 years
    Description:

    This table contains 172 series, with data for years 1996 - 1996 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (173 items: Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services St. John's Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services Eastern Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; ...).

    Release date: 2017-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines why rates of homeownership have been increasing amongst young higher-income households, but declining among young lower-income households. For the period from 1981 to 2006, household data from the Census of Population, supplemented with information from the Survey of Financial Security, are employed to model the decision to own across the income distribution. The model assesses whether housing market conditions (e.g., the cost of renting versus owning), the financial condition of households (e.g., whether the household has sufficient wealth to make a standard down payment), and demographic factors (e.g., changing family composition) account for these diverging trends in housing demand.

    Release date: 2013-01-29
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 11-10-0037-01
    (formerly: CANSIM 109-0014)
    Frequency: Every 5 years
    Description:

    This table contains 172 series, with data for years 1996 - 1996 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years), and is no longer being released. This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (173 items: Canada; Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services St. John's Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; Health and Community Services Eastern Region, Newfoundland and Labrador; ...).

    Release date: 2017-03-06
Analysis (53)

Analysis (53) (0 to 10 of 53 results)

  • Stats in brief: 45-28-0001202000100029
    Description:

    The economic lockdown to stop the spread of COVID-19 has led to steep declines in employment and hours worked for many Canadians. For workers in essential services, in jobs that can be done with proper physical distancing measures or in jobs that can be done from home, the likelihood of experiencing a work interruption during the pandemic is lower than for other workers. This article assesses how the feasibility of working from home varies across Canadian families. It also considers the implications of these differences for family earnings inequality.

    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-001-X202016024143
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2020-06-08

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2020022
    Description:

    This infographic examines the impact of public sector salary disclosure laws on university faculty salaries in Canada.

    Release date: 2020-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2020007
    Description:

    The dispersion of earnings among workers may come from multiple sources. It may reflect differences in workers’ characteristics, such as education and experience. It may also be because workers are employed at different firms that pay differently. Recent studies from other countries have found that firms play an important role in explaining earnings disparities among workers, often through the link between productivity and pay. However, there has been no Canadian evidence on the link between the earnings dispersion and firm differences because of a lack of matched employer–employee data. This paper presents developments in the dispersion of individuals’ earnings in Canada and examines the potential of firm characteristics to account for this dispersion and changes in this dispersion in the post-2000 period using the Canadian Employer–Employee Dynamics Database.

    Release date: 2020-02-20

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019065
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey, this infographic highlights the gender wage gap and its sources in 2018.

    Release date: 2019-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 45-20-00022019001
    Description:

    Reducing pay inequality between women and men is a key priority, both nationally and internationally, for achieving gender equality. Documenting gender inequality in pay and tracking progress in this regard for policy purposes requires at least one indicator. The adjusted gender pay gap-the raw difference between the employment earnings of women and men, expressed either as a proportion of men's earnings (i.e., the "gender pay ratio") or one minus the gender pay ratio-typically serves this purpose. At present, there are no internationally-recognized standards for measuring the adjusted gender pay gap, leaving considerable scope for political choice.

    The purpose of this paper is to inform the development of international standards for measuring the adjusted gender pay gap by explaining the assumptions underlying, and the implications following from, various methods. Additionally, the paper strives to increase literacy about the meaning and interpretation of different estimates of the gender pay gap, and to bring together various explanations for the gender pay gap.

    Release date: 2019-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-654-X2018002
    Description:

    This profile article is the first main release by Statistics Canada based on findings from the 2017 Canadian Survey on Disability. It is divided into three sections - demographics, employment, and income - and provides a general snapshot on persons with disabilities to inform on emerging government priorities (such as Opportunity for All: Canada's First Poverty Reduction Strategy; Government of Canada, 2018) and community interest in the areas of disability prevalence, labour market participation, and income inequality.

    Release date: 2018-11-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2014364
    Description:

    During the 1980s and 1990s, immigration was associated with the rise in low-income rates and family-income inequality in Canada. Over the 2000s, there were significant changes in the labour market and in immigrant selection. This paper focuses on the direct effect of immigration on the change in low income and family-income inequality over the 1995-to-2010 period. The paper outlines recent trends in low-income rates and income inequality for both the Canadian-born and immigrants. The low-income rate in Canada fell during the 2000s. Was this driven in part by changes in economic outcomes among immigrants? Inequality increased considerably in the late 1990s. Did immigration contribute to this increase?

    Release date: 2014-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2013083
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper examines why rates of homeownership have been increasing amongst young higher-income households, but declining among young lower-income households. For the period from 1981 to 2006, household data from the Census of Population, supplemented with information from the Survey of Financial Security, are employed to model the decision to own across the income distribution. The model assesses whether housing market conditions (e.g., the cost of renting versus owning), the financial condition of households (e.g., whether the household has sufficient wealth to make a standard down payment), and demographic factors (e.g., changing family composition) account for these diverging trends in housing demand.

    Release date: 2013-01-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2010020
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using 2001 Census data, this paper investigates the extent to which the urban-rural gap in the earnings of employed workers is associated with human capital composition and agglomeration economies. Both factors have been theoretically and empirically linked to urban-rural earnings differences. Agglomeration economies-the productivity enhancing effects of the geographic concentration of workers and firms-may underlie these differences as they may be stronger in larger urban centres. But human capital composition may also drive the urban-rural earnings gap if workers with higher levels of education and/or experience are more prevalent in cities. The analysis finds that up to one-half of urban-rural earnings differences are related to human capital composition. It also demonstrates that agglomeration economies related to city size are associated with earnings levels, but their influence is significantly reduced by the inclusion of controls for human capital.

    Release date: 2010-01-25
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