Victimization

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  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111614
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS), this Juristat article presents information on the victimization experiences of those aged 15 years and over living in the territories. It examines the nature and extent of criminal victimization in the territories, as well as the socio-demographic and economic characteristics of those who have been victimized. This Juristat article also presents information on reporting victimizations to police, the use of victims' services and the perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system among residents of the territories.

    Release date: 2012-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111577
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on perceptions of personal safety and crime as reported by Canadians aged 15 and over living in the ten provinces. Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, it analyses Canadians' satisfaction with their personal safety from crime while performing specific activities, at both the provincial and census metropolitan area levels. It also includes information on Canadians' perceptions of the level of crime and social disorder in their neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2011-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111415
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. Interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.This Juristat article presents information on criminal victimizations as reported by Aboriginal people living in the ten provinces during 2009, with a particular focus on violent victimizations. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic risk factors, consequences of victimization, reasons for reporting (and not reporting) incidents to police and perceptions of personal safety.

    Release date: 2011-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-005-X201100111407
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This Juristat Bulletin presents the most up-to-date information on police-reported incidents and court cases involving criminal harassment in Canada. Specific issues include: rates of criminal harassment, geographic location of this type of offence, characteristics of victims and accused, such as age and sex, and the sentences most often received for incidents of criminal harassment.

    Release date: 2011-03-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211340
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fifith time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 2004, 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2009 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization.

    Release date: 2010-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010024
    Geography: Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This profile analyzes the differences in the violent victimizations experienced by males and females that comes to the attention of the police. Specifically, the report examines the types of violations experienced by each gender, the seriousness of their victimization and the location of the incident. The report outlines the differences in overall rates of victimization at the census metropolitan area, provincial/territorial and national level. The analysis is based on 2008 police-reported data obtained from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. Funding for this profile was provided by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues of the Department of Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010023
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    While they may be young, children and youth under the age of 18 fall victim to the same types of violence as adults including physical and sexual assault, robbery, criminal harassment and homicide. They can be victimized by a family member, a friend, an acquaintance or a stranger while in their own home, in their neighbourhood or at school. Quantifying the incidence of violent victimization against children and youth continues to be a challenge. In Canada, detailed information about police-reported violent incidents committed against children and youth is collected through the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR2) Survey. This report analyzes the nature and extent of police-reported violence committed against children and youth under the age of 18. It examines differences in victimization based on sex and age of victims, type of offence, prevalence across the provinces and territories, relationship to the perpetrator, weapon used and level of injury. It also presents information on trends over time.

    Release date: 2010-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050078803
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization. The impacts and consequences of being victimized are discussed, along with the informal and formal sources of support for victims.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040058404
    Geography: Canada, Province or territory, Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of residential, business and 'other' breaking and entering (B&E) offences in Canada, including trends in police-reported B&Es at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. In addition, the characteristics of all B&E incidents, victims and accused will be discussed as well as residential breaking and entering offences with the intent or threat of violence (home invasion). Finally, court responses to these types of incidents will be presented.

    Release date: 2004-07-08
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-564-X
    Geography: Province or territory
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10
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