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All (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154969
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population to examine changes between 2005 and 2015 in the work activity patterns of Canadian families with children. Results by education level and by immigration status are discussed, as well as results for lone parent families. The paper also provides an overview of regional differences in the work activity patterns of Canadian families.

    Release date: 2018-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Stats in brief: 99-012-X201100311850
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19
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Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154969
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Census of Population to examine changes between 2005 and 2015 in the work activity patterns of Canadian families with children. Results by education level and by immigration status are discussed, as well as results for lone parent families. The paper also provides an overview of regional differences in the work activity patterns of Canadian families.

    Release date: 2018-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016385
    Description:

    This study contributes to the debate about the role of self-employment in helping women improve family–work balance by offering Canadian evidence from a uniquely rich dataset that links individual records from the 2006 Census of Population to records from the 2011 National Household Survey. Unlike most previous studies estimating the determinants of women’s self-employment, the analysis focuses directly on transitions from wage employment to self-employment among new mothers.

    Release date: 2016-11-25

  • Stats in brief: 89-652-X2016003
    Description:

    This fact sheet examines the satisfaction with work-life balance of mothers and fathers of children aged 17 and under who work full-time.

    Release date: 2016-04-14

  • Stats in brief: 99-012-X201100311850
    Geography: Census metropolitan area
    Description:

    This National Household Survey in brief presents key findings emerging from the analysis of data on place of work and journey to work in Canada in 2011. It provides information on workers' mode of transportation, their place of work and their commuting time. The analysis focuses on various levels of geography, including Canada and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2013-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111366
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Using data from the different cycles of the General Social Survey from 2000 to 2008, this article explores the evolution of the popularity of working at home among employees and the self-employed. In particular, the characteristics of the workers most likely to work at home as well as the various reasons behind this phenomenon are studied. Perceptions about working at home and work-life balance are also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-12-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013238
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although it has received some attention in the Canadian literature, the issue of work life balance of older workers remains largely understudied. This article addresses that gap using data from the 2005 General Social Survey. Overall, 14% of Canadian workers age 55 and over reported being dissatisfied with their work life balance in 2005. The sources of conflict most frequently cited were too much time on the job and too little time for the family. Work life balance dissatisfaction was associated with having a disability, providing elder care, working long hours, occupying a managerial position and being a woman. At the same time, having an employed partner, being self-employed and enjoying one's job reduced the probability of work life conflict. When the self-selection of older individuals out of employment was taken into account, the risk of work life conflict did not vary with age.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910813235
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Women's labour market participation has increased substantially over recent decades, creating challenges for families in balancing work-life responsibilities. The examination of family work patterns revealed significant differences in annual hours of work between families with and those without children.

    Release date: 2009-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19
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