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All (48) (0 to 10 of 48 results)

  • Table: 91-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. The Quarterly Demographic Estimates publication contains the most recent estimates as well as a quarterly historical series. It also contains highlights and analysis of the most current demographic trends, as well as a brief description of the concepts, methods and data quality of the estimates.

    Release date: 2020-06-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 62F0026M
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on the issues, concepts, methodology, data quality and other relevant research related to household expenditures from the Survey of Household Spending, the Homeowner Repair and Renovation Survey and the Food Expenditure Survey.

    Release date: 2018-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600114540
    Description:

    In this paper, we compare the EBLUP and pseudo-EBLUP estimators for small area estimation under the nested error regression model and three area level model-based estimators using the Fay-Herriot model. We conduct a design-based simulation study to compare the model-based estimators for unit level and area level models under informative and non-informative sampling. In particular, we are interested in the confidence interval coverage rate of the unit level and area level estimators. We also compare the estimators if the model has been misspecified. Our simulation results show that estimators based on the unit level model perform better than those based on the area level. The pseudo-EBLUP estimator is the best among unit level and area level estimators.

    Release date: 2016-06-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91-528-X
    Description:

    This manual provides detailed descriptions of the data sources and methods used by Statistics Canada to estimate population. They comprise Postcensal and intercensal population estimates; base population; births and deaths; immigration; emigration; non-permanent residents; interprovincial migration; subprovincial estimates of population; population estimates by age, sex and marital status; and census family estimates. A glossary of principal terms is contained at the end of the manual, followed by the standard notation used.

    Until now, literature on the methodological changes for estimates calculations has always been spread throughout various Statistics Canada publications and background papers. This manual provides users of demographic statistics with a comprehensive compilation of the current procedures used by Statistics Canada to prepare population and family estimates.

    Release date: 2015-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211754
    Description:

    The propensity-scoring-adjustment approach is commonly used to handle selection bias in survey sampling applications, including unit nonresponse and undercoverage. The propensity score is computed using auxiliary variables observed throughout the sample. We discuss some asymptotic properties of propensity-score-adjusted estimators and derive optimal estimators based on a regression model for the finite population. An optimal propensity-score-adjusted estimator can be implemented using an augmented propensity model. Variance estimation is discussed and the results from two simulation studies are presented.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-567-X
    Description:

    The Coverage Technical Report will present the error included in census data that results from persons missed by the 2006 Census or persons enumerated in error. Population coverage errors are one of the most important types of error because they affect not only the accuracy of population counts but also the accuracy of all of the census data describing characteristics of the population universe.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-569-X2006002
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    The second edition includes the same content as the first, and new text has been added on data processing (Chapter 3). As well, modified content about data quality and 'on reserve' communities has been incorporated into the original sections.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-569-X
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010979
    Description:

    Prior to 2006, the Canadian Census of Population relied on field staff to deliver questionnaires to all dwellings in Canada. For the 2006 Census, an address frame was created to cover almost 70% of dwellings in Canada, and these questionnaires were delivered by Canada Post. For the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada aims to expand this frame further, with a target of delivering questionnaires by mail to between 80% and 85% of dwellings. Mailing questionnaires for the Census raises a number of issues, among them: ensuring returned questionnaires are counted in the right area, creating an up to date address frame that includes all new growth, and determining which areas are unsuitable for having questionnaires delivered by mail. Changes to the address frame update procedures for 2011, most notably the decision to use purely administrative data as the frame wherever possible and conduct field update exercises only where deemed necessary, provide a new set of challenges for the 2011 Census.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010989
    Description:

    At first sight, web surveys seem to be an interesting and attractive means of data collection. They provide simple, cheap and fast access to a large group of people. However, web surveys also suffer from methodological problems. Outcomes of web surveys may be severally biased, particularly if self-selection of respondents is applied instead of proper probability sampling. Under-coverage is also a serious problem. This raises the question whether web surveys can be used for data collection in official statistics. This paper addresses the problems under-coverage and self-selection in web surveys, and attempts to describe how Internet data collection can be incorporated in normal data collection practices of official statistics.

    Release date: 2009-12-03
Data (3)

Data (3) ((3 results))

  • Table: 91-002-X
    Description:

    This publication presents quarterly estimates of population for Canada, provinces and territories as well as statistics on the following components of population change: births, deaths, immigration, emigration, returning emigration, net temporary emigration, net non-permanent residents and interprovincial migration, the latter by origin and destination. The Quarterly Demographic Estimates publication contains the most recent estimates as well as a quarterly historical series. It also contains highlights and analysis of the most current demographic trends, as well as a brief description of the concepts, methods and data quality of the estimates.

    Release date: 2020-06-18

  • Table: 91-213-X
    Description:

    This publication contains population estimates by age and sex for Canada, provinces, territories, census divisions, census metropolitan areas and economic regions. It also includes, for provinces and territories, estimates by age, sex and marital status as well as estimates for census families.

    The estimates are based on the 2001 Census results, which have been adjusted for net census undercoverage. The publication also includes statistics for the demographic components that were used to produce the population estimates (births, deaths, marriages, divorces, immigration, emigration, net temporary emigration, returning emigration, internal migration and non-permanent residents) by age and sex. In addition, the publication contains highlights of current demographic trends and a description of the methodology.

    The print version of the publication includes a CD-ROM that provides additional data such as a chronological series of estimates by various levels of geography. With regard to provinces and territories, the estimates date back to 1971 (tables and animated age pyramid), 1986 for census divisions, census metropolitan areas and economic regions as well as census families.

    The time series available on the CD-ROM can be easily captured and manipulated by analysts who want to create customized demographic analyses in any spreadsheet program. The population figures can be used, for example, to calculate per-capita rates required for market research, quantitative analysis and planning.

    Release date: 2006-04-04

  • Public use microdata: 82M0011X
    Description:

    The main objective of the 2002 Youth Smoking Survey (YSS) is to provide current information on the smoking behaviour of students in grades 5 to 9 (in Quebec primary school grades 5 and 6 and secondary school grades 1 to 3), and to measure changes that occurred since the last time the survey was conducted in 1994. Additionally, the 2002 survey collected basic data on alcohol and drug use by students in grades 7 to 9 (in Quebec secondary 1 to 3). Results of the Youth Smoking Survey will help with the evaluation of anti-smoking and anti-drug use programs, as well as with the development of new programs.

    Release date: 2004-07-14
Analysis (31)

Analysis (31) (0 to 10 of 31 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 62F0026M
    Description:

    This series provides detailed documentation on the issues, concepts, methodology, data quality and other relevant research related to household expenditures from the Survey of Household Spending, the Homeowner Repair and Renovation Survey and the Food Expenditure Survey.

    Release date: 2018-12-12

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201600114540
    Description:

    In this paper, we compare the EBLUP and pseudo-EBLUP estimators for small area estimation under the nested error regression model and three area level model-based estimators using the Fay-Herriot model. We conduct a design-based simulation study to compare the model-based estimators for unit level and area level models under informative and non-informative sampling. In particular, we are interested in the confidence interval coverage rate of the unit level and area level estimators. We also compare the estimators if the model has been misspecified. Our simulation results show that estimators based on the unit level model perform better than those based on the area level. The pseudo-EBLUP estimator is the best among unit level and area level estimators.

    Release date: 2016-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X201200211754
    Description:

    The propensity-scoring-adjustment approach is commonly used to handle selection bias in survey sampling applications, including unit nonresponse and undercoverage. The propensity score is computed using auxiliary variables observed throughout the sample. We discuss some asymptotic properties of propensity-score-adjusted estimators and derive optimal estimators based on a regression model for the finite population. An optimal propensity-score-adjusted estimator can be implemented using an augmented propensity model. Variance estimation is discussed and the results from two simulation studies are presented.

    Release date: 2012-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010979
    Description:

    Prior to 2006, the Canadian Census of Population relied on field staff to deliver questionnaires to all dwellings in Canada. For the 2006 Census, an address frame was created to cover almost 70% of dwellings in Canada, and these questionnaires were delivered by Canada Post. For the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada aims to expand this frame further, with a target of delivering questionnaires by mail to between 80% and 85% of dwellings. Mailing questionnaires for the Census raises a number of issues, among them: ensuring returned questionnaires are counted in the right area, creating an up to date address frame that includes all new growth, and determining which areas are unsuitable for having questionnaires delivered by mail. Changes to the address frame update procedures for 2011, most notably the decision to use purely administrative data as the frame wherever possible and conduct field update exercises only where deemed necessary, provide a new set of challenges for the 2011 Census.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 11-522-X200800010989
    Description:

    At first sight, web surveys seem to be an interesting and attractive means of data collection. They provide simple, cheap and fast access to a large group of people. However, web surveys also suffer from methodological problems. Outcomes of web surveys may be severally biased, particularly if self-selection of respondents is applied instead of proper probability sampling. Under-coverage is also a serious problem. This raises the question whether web surveys can be used for data collection in official statistics. This paper addresses the problems under-coverage and self-selection in web surveys, and attempts to describe how Internet data collection can be incorporated in normal data collection practices of official statistics.

    Release date: 2009-12-03

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-639-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Beginning in late 2006, the Social and Aboriginal Statistics Division of Statistics Canada embarked on the process of review of questions used in the Census and in surveys to produce data about Aboriginal peoples (North American Indian, Métis and Inuit). This process is essential to ensure that Aboriginal identification questions are valid measures of contemporary Aboriginal identification, in all its complexity. Questions reviewed included the following (from the Census 2B questionnaire):- the Ethnic origin / Aboriginal ancestry question;- the Aboriginal identity question;- the Treaty / Registered Indian question; and- the Indian band / First Nation Membership question.

    Additional testing was conducted on Census questions with potential Aboriginal response options: the population group question (also known as visible minorities), and the Religion question. The review process to date has involved two major steps: regional discussions with data users and stakeholders, and qualitative testing. The regional discussions with over 350 users of Aboriginal data across Canada were held in early 2007 to examine the four questions used on the Census and other surveys of Statistics Canada. Data users included National Aboriginal organizations, Aboriginal Provincial and Territorial Organizations, Federal, Provincial and local governments, researchers and Aboriginal service organizations. User feedback showed that main areas of concern were data quality, undercoverage, the wording of questions, and the importance of comparability over time.

    Release date: 2009-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800410703
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Data from 16,190 respondents to the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey - Nutrition were used to estimate under-reporting of food intake for the population aged 12 or older in the 10 provinces.

    Release date: 2008-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X200800410704
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    A 24-hour dietary recall from 16,190 respondents aged 12 or older to the Canadian Community Health Survey - Nutrition was used to determine energy and nutrient intake. To identify plausible respondents, a confidence interval was applied to total energy expenditure derived from equations developed by the Institute of Medicine. Estimates of energy and nutrient intake for plausible respondents were compared with estimates for all respondents.

    Release date: 2008-10-15

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200800110616
    Description:

    With complete multivariate data the BACON algorithm (Billor, Hadi and Vellemann 2000) yields a robust estimate of the covariance matrix. The corresponding Mahalanobis distance may be used for multivariate outlier detection. When items are missing the EM algorithm is a convenient way to estimate the covariance matrix at each iteration step of the BACON algorithm. In finite population sampling the EM algorithm must be enhanced to estimate the covariance matrix of the population rather than of the sample. A version of the EM algorithm for survey data following a multivariate normal model, the EEM algorithm (Estimated Expectation Maximization), is proposed. The combination of the two algorithms, the BACON-EEM algorithm, is applied to two datasets and compared with alternative methods.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 12-001-X200700210497
    Description:

    Coverage deficiencies are estimated and analysed for the 2000 population census in Switzerland. For the undercoverage component, the estimation is based on a sample independent of the census and a match with the census. For the overcoverage component, the estimation is based on a sample drawn from the census list and a match with the rest of the census. The over- and undercoverage components are then combined to obtain an estimate of the resulting net coverage. This estimate is based on a capture-recapture model, named the dual system, combined with a synthetic model. The estimators are calculated for the full population and different subgroups, with a variance estimated by a stratified jackknife. The coverage analyses are supplemented by a study of matches between the independent sample and the census in order to determine potential errors of measurement and location in the census data.

    Release date: 2008-01-03
Reference (14)

Reference (14) (0 to 10 of 14 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 91-528-X
    Description:

    This manual provides detailed descriptions of the data sources and methods used by Statistics Canada to estimate population. They comprise Postcensal and intercensal population estimates; base population; births and deaths; immigration; emigration; non-permanent residents; interprovincial migration; subprovincial estimates of population; population estimates by age, sex and marital status; and census family estimates. A glossary of principal terms is contained at the end of the manual, followed by the standard notation used.

    Until now, literature on the methodological changes for estimates calculations has always been spread throughout various Statistics Canada publications and background papers. This manual provides users of demographic statistics with a comprehensive compilation of the current procedures used by Statistics Canada to prepare population and family estimates.

    Release date: 2015-11-17

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-567-X
    Description:

    The Coverage Technical Report will present the error included in census data that results from persons missed by the 2006 Census or persons enumerated in error. Population coverage errors are one of the most important types of error because they affect not only the accuracy of population counts but also the accuracy of all of the census data describing characteristics of the population universe.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-569-X2006002
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    The second edition includes the same content as the first, and new text has been added on data processing (Chapter 3). As well, modified content about data quality and 'on reserve' communities has been incorporated into the original sections.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-569-X
    Description:

    The 2006 Census Technical Report on Aboriginal Peoples deals with: (i) Aboriginal ancestry, (ii) Aboriginal identity, (iii) registered Indian status, and (iv) First Nation or Band membership. The report aims to inform users about the complexity of the data and any difficulties that could affect their use. It explains the conceptual framework and definitions used to gather the data, and it discusses factors that could affect data quality. The historical comparability of the data is also discussed.

    Release date: 2010-02-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X200700210491
    Description:

    Poststratification is a common method of estimation in household surveys. Cells are formed based on characteristics that are known for all sample respondents and for which external control counts are available from a census or another source. The inverses of the poststratification adjustments are usually referred to as coverage ratios. Coverage of some demographic groups may be substantially below 100 percent, and poststratifying serves to correct for biases due to poor coverage. A standard procedure in poststratification is to collapse or combine cells when the sample sizes fall below some minimum or the weight adjustments are above some maximum. Collapsing can either increase or decrease the variance of an estimate but may simultaneously increase its bias. We study the effects on bias and variance of this type of dynamic cell collapsing theoretically and through simulation using a population based on the 2003 National Health Interview Survey. Two alternative estimators are also proposed that restrict the size of weight adjustments when cells are collapsed.

    Release date: 2008-01-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2005006
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2003 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 92-393-X
    Description:

    This report is a brief guide to users of census income data. It provides a general description of the various 2001 Census phases, from data collection, through processing for non-response, to dissemination. Descriptions of, and summary data on, the changes to income data that occurred during the processing stages are given. Comparative data from national accounts and tax data sources at a highly aggregated level are also presented to put the quality of the 2001 Census income data into perspective. For users wishing to compare census income data over time, changes in income content and universe coverage over the years are explained. Finally, a complete description of all census products containing income data is also supplied.

    Release date: 2004-09-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2004001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2002 Survey of Household Spending. These quality indicators, such as coefficients of variation, nonresponse rates, slippage rates and imputation rates, help users interpret the survey data.

    Release date: 2004-09-15

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 62F0026M2002001
    Description:

    This report describes the quality indicators produced for the 2000 Survey of Household Spending. It covers the usual quality indicators that help users interpret the data, such as coefficients of variation, non-response rates, slippage rates and imputation rates.

    Release date: 2002-06-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X20000015179
    Description:

    This paper suggests estimating the conditional mean squared error of small area estimators to evaluate their accuracy. This mean squared error is conditional in the sense that it measures the variability with respect to the sampling design for a particular realization of the smoothing model underlying the small area estimators. An unbiased estimators for the conditional mean squared error is easily constructed using Stein's Lemma for the expectation of normal random variables.

    Release date: 2000-08-30
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