Keyword search

Sort Help
entries

Results

All (20)

All (20) (0 to 10 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154974
    Description:

    This study uses the 2017 and 2018 Labour Force Survey to provide a recent profile of minimum wage workers. The paper focuses on three groups of minimum wage workers: students aged 15 to 24 and non-students the same age living with their parents (referred to below as minimum wage workers under 25); individuals aged 15 to 64 who are single, lone parents or spouses/partners in single-earner couples; and individuals aged 15 to 64 who are spouses/partners in dual-earner couples. The article documents the relative importance of these three groups as well as their weekly wages and work patterns.

    Release date: 2018-06-13

  • 13C0016
    Description:

    Annual information is available on census families (couple families and lone-parent families) and persons not in census families.

    Data for families may be requested by age group of family members, number and age of children, average family size, total family income range by age or by number of children, sources of family income, economic dependency, low income families, after-tax income, single-earner and dual-earner families and wife's contribution to total husband-wife employment income. Statistics on persons not in census families provide details on age group, income group and sources of income. The statistics are derived primarily from the annual tax file provided by the Canada Revenue Agency.

    Data for couple families, lone-parent families and persons not in census families can be requested beginning in 1990. The latest data (2017) can be requested for Canada, provinces and territories, federal electoral districts, economic regions, census divisions, census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations, census tracts and certain postal geographies.

    Release date: 2017-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016007
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the changes of the Canadian stay-at-home parents since 1976.

    Release date: 2016-09-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016005
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the rise of dual-earner family with children from 1976 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008305
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite comparatively modest welfare reforms in Canada relative to those of the United States, employment rates and earnings among single mothers have risen by virtually identical magnitudes in the two countries since 1980. We show that most of the gains in Canada and a substantial share of the change in the United States were the result of the dynamics of cohort replacement and population aging as the large and better educated baby boom generation replaced earlier cohorts and began entering their forties. In both countries, demographic effects were the main factor accounting for higher employment and earnings among older (40 and over) single mothers. Changes among younger single mothers, in contrast, were mainly the result of changes in labour market behaviour and other unmeasured variables. Overall, demographic changes dominated in Canada but not in the United States for two reasons: (a) Canadian single mothers are significantly older than their U.S. counterparts; and, (b) consistent with the welfare reform thesis, the magnitude of behavioural change among younger single mothers was much larger in the United States.

    Release date: 2008-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The strong growth of telework in the 1990s seems to have stalled since the turn of the century. Despite significant improvements in the infrastructure, the fall-off in telework popularity has been pervasive.

    Release date: 2007-09-18
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Table: 13-215-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This annual publication presents detailed tabulations on income of two-spouse families. It highlights families where both spouses work for pay by exploring their income and related characteristics and comparing them with other two-spouse families where only one spouse, or neither spouse, receives earnings from employment.

    Release date: 1999-09-10
Analysis (17)

Analysis (17) (0 to 10 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154974
    Description:

    This study uses the 2017 and 2018 Labour Force Survey to provide a recent profile of minimum wage workers. The paper focuses on three groups of minimum wage workers: students aged 15 to 24 and non-students the same age living with their parents (referred to below as minimum wage workers under 25); individuals aged 15 to 64 who are single, lone parents or spouses/partners in single-earner couples; and individuals aged 15 to 64 who are spouses/partners in dual-earner couples. The article documents the relative importance of these three groups as well as their weekly wages and work patterns.

    Release date: 2018-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-630-X2016007
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the changes of the Canadian stay-at-home parents since 1976.

    Release date: 2016-09-28

  • Stats in brief: 11-630-X2016005
    Description:

    This edition of Canadian Megatrends looks at the rise of dual-earner family with children from 1976 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114202
    Description:

    This paper examines the employment patterns of families with children (under the age of 16) over the period from 1976 to 2014, with a particular focus on couple families with children. This article also highlights regional differences in the working patterns of parents, and provides additional information on the employment patterns of lone parents.

    Release date: 2015-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100411595
    Description:

    This article summarizes the key findings of a recent research report that examined the characteristics of young people who are most likely to go on to college or university following high school graduation and the factors that play a role in that decision. The focus of that research is on: youth from lower-income families; those from families with no parental history of attending postsecondary education; those living in rural areas; first- and second-generation children of immigrants; those from single parent (or other non-traditional) families; and Aboriginal youth.

    Release date: 2011-12-14

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200911013237
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Between 1980 and 2005, parental work time increased by substantial margins, especially for families located at the bottom and in the middle of the earnings distribution. However, this increase occurred against a backdrop of a stronger increase in earnings for families at the top of the earnings distribution. This study finds that high earnings families earned more in 2005 than in 1980 for a given amount of parental work time, likely because of higher wages.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200910413228
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although the average work week has been declining, overall family work hours have increased. In 2008, dual-earners accounted for three-quarters of all couples with dependent children, compared with just over one-third in 1976. Over the period, the combined paid work hours of couples increased from an average of 58 per week to 65.

    Release date: 2009-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2008305
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Despite comparatively modest welfare reforms in Canada relative to those of the United States, employment rates and earnings among single mothers have risen by virtually identical magnitudes in the two countries since 1980. We show that most of the gains in Canada and a substantial share of the change in the United States were the result of the dynamics of cohort replacement and population aging as the large and better educated baby boom generation replaced earlier cohorts and began entering their forties. In both countries, demographic effects were the main factor accounting for higher employment and earnings among older (40 and over) single mothers. Changes among younger single mothers, in contrast, were mainly the result of changes in labour market behaviour and other unmeasured variables. Overall, demographic changes dominated in Canada but not in the United States for two reasons: (a) Canadian single mothers are significantly older than their U.S. counterparts; and, (b) consistent with the welfare reform thesis, the magnitude of behavioural change among younger single mothers was much larger in the United States.

    Release date: 2008-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710613189
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The strong growth of telework in the 1990s seems to have stalled since the turn of the century. Despite significant improvements in the infrastructure, the fall-off in telework popularity has been pervasive.

    Release date: 2007-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0024M20040007452
    Description:

    The report examines income and low income in census metropolitan areas between 1980 and 2000. It examines the situation of families and the neighbourhoods they live in. It also examines the situation of recent immigrants, Aboriginal people and lone-parent family members.

    Median pre-tax income rose in virtually all Canadian census metropolitan areas (CMAs) over the 1980 to 2000 period. Incomes increased at both the top and bottom of the income distribution, but tended to rise faster at the top. In nearly all cities, income increased faster in the higher income neighbourhoods - measured at the census tract (CT) level - than it did in lower income neighbourhoods. The incidence of low income was at similar levels in 1980 and 2000, but the demographic composition of low income changed, reflecting rising low-income rates among some 'at-risk' groups, as well as demographic changes in the CMA. By 2000, recent immigrants comprised more of the low-income population, and a greater share of the residents in low-income neighbourhoods than they did in 1980. Recent immigrants had much higher low-income rates in 2000 than in 1980. In 2000, Aboriginal people and people in single-parent families had much higher low-income rates than others and were over-represented in low-income neighbourhoods. The share of income that low-income families received from government transfers rose over the period. The location of low-income neighbourhoods changed in some CMAs, reflecting a decline in low-income neighbourhoods in the city centre and a rise in low-income neighbourhoods in more suburban areas.

    The report examines before-tax income in CMAs using the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-11-25
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 64F0004X
    Description:

    This practical and informative guide for the construction industry will assist in navigating through numerous Statistics Canada products and services.

    Release date: 2002-12-13
Date modified: