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  • Data Visualization: 71-607-X2019033
    Description:

    Immigrant Mobility by Geography of admission, Geography of residence, Immigrant mobility indicators, Age groups and sex at taxation year, Pre-admission experience, Knowledge of official languages at admission, Immigrant admission category, and admission year.

    Release date: 2019-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017006
    Description:

    This paper describes a method of imputing missing postal codes in a longitudinal database. The 1991 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), which contains information on individuals from the 1991 Census long-form questionnaire linked with T1 tax return files for the 1984-to-2011 period, is used to illustrate and validate the method. The cohort contains up to 28 consecutive fields for postal code of residence, but because of frequent gaps in postal code history, missing postal codes must be imputed. To validate the imputation method, two experiments were devised where 5% and 10% of all postal codes from a subset with full history were randomly removed and imputed.

    Release date: 2017-03-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-645-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance provides data users with a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. It includes data for the First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, and Inuit populations. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting key indicators, a plain language definition of the indicator and links to related data tables and published articles to further assist users in meeting their data needs. Data sources include the 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, and the 2007/2008 Adult Correctional Services Survey.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114152
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada introduces selected socio-demographic and ethnocultural characteristics of the female population in Canada. Accounting for approximately half of the population, women and girls are characterized by different historical social and demographic trajectories that distinguish them from men and boys in this country. In order to effectively plan and develop programs and policy directed toward women and girls, it is necessary to understand trends pertaining to population growth and age structure, as well as the consequences of these patterns on population aging and the composition of the population, and how these might vary by sex. Among the topics to be examined in this chapter are the shares of women and girls in the total population, trends by age, including historical comparisons and some regional differences across the provinces and territories. Selected aspects of diversity within the female population will also be presented, including Aboriginal identity, immigrant status and visible minority status, as well as trends related to residential mobility, marital status, language and religion.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111618
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The age and other characteristics of emigrants who return to Canada may have social and economic implications - particularly with respect to transfer programs for seniors. This study uses census data to address several questions related to Canadian residents who previously emigrated to other countries: Do seniors account for a large proportion of returned emigrants? From where do older emigrants return? Do the characteristics of older returned emigrants differ from those of older Canadians who did not live abroad? Do the amounts and sources of income received in old age differ between these groups? How do all these results differ for the Canadian-born versus immigrant returnees?

    Release date: 2012-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111508
    Description:

    This article examines the estimated population count and growth for Canada, the provinces and territories as of January 1, 2011 and analyzes the demographic components that account for this growth. The total, natural and migratory population growth rates are examined from 1972 to 2010, followed by an in-depth study of the growth rate for the past year (2009 to 2010) at the provincial level and territorial level.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the late 1990s, studies showed that a growing number of the most qualified Canadian workers were leaving Canada to work in the United States. This article looks at whether this trend has continued in recent years. Using a relatively new data source, the American Community Survey (ACS), this article examines Canadian emigration to the United States. More specifically, it examines demographic and socio-economic characteristics of those who migrate to the United States.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Stats in brief: 81-600-X2009002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of four fact sheets in a series using Statistics Canada data sources relating to the education and training of workers in health and related occupations. Using the 2007 National Graduates Survey (NGS) (Class of 2005), this fact sheet provides information on the interprovincial mobility (mobility to study and mobility after graduation) of graduates of programs leading to health and health-related occupations.

    Release date: 2009-05-01
Data (9)

Data (9) ((9 results))

Analysis (13)

Analysis (13) (0 to 10 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017006
    Description:

    This paper describes a method of imputing missing postal codes in a longitudinal database. The 1991 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohort (CanCHEC), which contains information on individuals from the 1991 Census long-form questionnaire linked with T1 tax return files for the 1984-to-2011 period, is used to illustrate and validate the method. The cohort contains up to 28 consecutive fields for postal code of residence, but because of frequent gaps in postal code history, missing postal codes must be imputed. To validate the imputation method, two experiments were devised where 5% and 10% of all postal codes from a subset with full history were randomly removed and imputed.

    Release date: 2017-03-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-645-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Aboriginal Statistics at a Glance provides data users with a thematic guide to Aboriginal data at Statistics Canada. It includes data for the First Nations (North American Indian), Métis, and Inuit populations. Each theme is illustrated with a chart presenting key indicators, a plain language definition of the indicator and links to related data tables and published articles to further assist users in meeting their data needs. Data sources include the 1996, 2001 and 2006 censuses of population, the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey, and the 2007/2008 Adult Correctional Services Survey.

    Release date: 2015-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114152
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada introduces selected socio-demographic and ethnocultural characteristics of the female population in Canada. Accounting for approximately half of the population, women and girls are characterized by different historical social and demographic trajectories that distinguish them from men and boys in this country. In order to effectively plan and develop programs and policy directed toward women and girls, it is necessary to understand trends pertaining to population growth and age structure, as well as the consequences of these patterns on population aging and the composition of the population, and how these might vary by sex. Among the topics to be examined in this chapter are the shares of women and girls in the total population, trends by age, including historical comparisons and some regional differences across the provinces and territories. Selected aspects of diversity within the female population will also be presented, including Aboriginal identity, immigrant status and visible minority status, as well as trends related to residential mobility, marital status, language and religion.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201200111618
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The age and other characteristics of emigrants who return to Canada may have social and economic implications - particularly with respect to transfer programs for seniors. This study uses census data to address several questions related to Canadian residents who previously emigrated to other countries: Do seniors account for a large proportion of returned emigrants? From where do older emigrants return? Do the characteristics of older returned emigrants differ from those of older Canadians who did not live abroad? Do the amounts and sources of income received in old age differ between these groups? How do all these results differ for the Canadian-born versus immigrant returnees?

    Release date: 2012-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111475
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    The Female Population chapter of Women in Canada presents the socio-demographic and ethno-cultural characteristics of women and girls living in this country. Understanding the current trends related to an aging, and an increasingly diverse female population, can help inform policy and planning. Topics examined in this chapter include the distribution of the female population across the provinces and territories and across age, and the share with an Aboriginal identity. In addition, aspects of diversity within the female population, including immigrant status and visible minority status, will be presented as well as residential mobility, language-related characteristics, and religious affiliation and religiosity. Where appropriate, trends over time will be analyzed and comparisons will be drawn with the male population in order to highlight existing similarities and differences.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X201100111508
    Description:

    This article examines the estimated population count and growth for Canada, the provinces and territories as of January 1, 2011 and analyzes the demographic components that account for this growth. The total, natural and migratory population growth rates are examined from 1972 to 2010, followed by an in-depth study of the growth rate for the past year (2009 to 2010) at the provincial level and territorial level.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2011089
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report examines the expectations and labour force outcomes of a recent doctoral graduating class by drawing from two different data sources that surveyed the same individuals at two different points in time. The first is the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), which interviewed the doctoral graduates at the time of their graduation in 2005. The second source is the National Graduates Survey (NGS), which interviewed them again in 2007.

    The study provides a profile of doctoral holders two years after graduation by examining their demographics and program characteristics as well as their expectations at the time of graduation. It also analyses their mobility patterns, with a particular focus on graduates who moved to the United States. Finally it examines the graduates' labour market outcomes, including employment rates, income, industry and the prevalence of over-qualification as compared to the graduates' expectations.

    Release date: 2011-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000211287
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In the late 1990s, studies showed that a growing number of the most qualified Canadian workers were leaving Canada to work in the United States. This article looks at whether this trend has continued in recent years. Using a relatively new data source, the American Community Survey (ACS), this article examines Canadian emigration to the United States. More specifically, it examines demographic and socio-economic characteristics of those who migrate to the United States.

    Release date: 2010-07-13

  • Stats in brief: 81-600-X2009002
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This is one of four fact sheets in a series using Statistics Canada data sources relating to the education and training of workers in health and related occupations. Using the 2007 National Graduates Survey (NGS) (Class of 2005), this fact sheet provides information on the interprovincial mobility (mobility to study and mobility after graduation) of graduates of programs leading to health and health-related occupations.

    Release date: 2009-05-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006288
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This paper exploits the unique strengths of the tax-based Longitudinal Administrative Database to measure the flows of Canadians to other countries and the patterns of return over the period from 1982 to 2003. Overall, approximately 0.1% (i.e., one tenth of 1%) of the adult population leaves the country in any given year. Departure rates have generally moved with the state of the Canadian economy, but the trends have clearly been driven by more than this: declining in the 1980s as the economy was going well; turning up towards the end of the decade, but before the economy began to stall in 1989; rising through the early part of the 1990s as the economy was mired in a deep recession, but then continuing to rise through 1997, by which time a strong recovery was underway; and then declining sharply since 2000-thus stemming what many had thought was an inexorable upwards trend-when economic factors were fairly stable. Departure rates decline with age (except for the youngest group); are lower for couples without children than other family types; are high for those in British Columbia, quite low for Francophone Quebecers, and very high for Anglophones in that province; are somewhat lower for those on Employment Insurance (formerly Unemployment Insurance) and substantially higher for those at higher-income levels; and are very much higher for recent immigrants. Departure rates for those at higher-income levels shifted upwards in the 1990s, but returned to pre-1990s rates in more recent years in the case of men, while the shift was maintained for women. Only a minority of those who leave ever return: about 15% within 5 years of their departure. Return rates have, however, increased significantly since 2000-mirroring to a large extent what was happening on the departure side.

    Release date: 2006-11-17
Reference (1)

Reference (1) ((1 result))

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 12-001-X19980013913
    Description:

    Temporary mobility is hypothesized to contribute toward within-household coverage error since it may affect an individual's determination of "usual residence" - a concept commonly applied when listing persons as part of a household-based survey or census. This paper explores a typology of temporary mobility patterns and how they relate to the identification of usual residence. Temporary mobility is defined by the pattern of movement away from, but usually back to a single residence over a two-three month reference period. The typology is constructed using two dimensions: the variety of places visited and the frequency of visits made. Using data from the U.S. Living Situation Survey (LSS) conducted in 1993, four types of temporary mobility patterns are identified. In particular, two groups exhibiting patterns of repeat visit behavior were found to contain more of the types of people who tend to be missed during censuses and surveys. Log-linear modeling indicates spent away and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-07-31
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