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All (23) (0 to 10 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100003
    Description:

    This study uses the Census of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family to examine the characteristics of the population living alone in Canada. The demographic, socioeconomic and housing characteristics of persons who live alone are examined, as well as their conjugal history, family relationships, and well-being indicators.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019018
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 1981 and 2016 Censuses of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family. The infographic depicts changes over time and provides selected characteristics of persons in Canada who lived alone in the reference years, including demographic statistics such as marital status, age and sex as well as statistics on future intentions to marry.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018053
    Description:

    This infographic highlights some of the information provided by the 2017 Survey of Household Spending. It presents the annual average spending on selected expenditures by various household types, including one person households, couples with and without children and lone-parent households. It also includes the percentage of homeownership and vehicle ownership by household type.

    Release date: 2018-12-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2008001
    Description:

    Shelter is the biggest expenditure most households make and its affordability can have an impact on the wellbeing of household members. For this reason, housing affordability is closely watched by a wide range of stakeholders - from housing advocates to policy analysts - interested in the welfare of Canadians. Measuring affordability involves comparing housing costs to a household's ability to meet them. One common measure is the shelter-cost-to-income-ratio (STIR). The 30% level is commonly accepted as the upper limit for affordable housing. Housing affordability is also a critical input to Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's core housing need indicator which is used by governments to help design, deliver, fund and evaluate social housing programs. This report, jointly authored by Statistics Canada and CMHC, focuses purely on the dynamics of housing affordability, not on core housing need. It examines the likelihood of spending 30% or more of household income on shelter, how often this occurs, whether it is occasional or persistent, and contrasts those spending 30% or more to those spending less. Cross-sectional estimates indicate that around 19% of Canadians lived in households spending more than the affordability benchmark in 2002. Longitudinally however, less than 9% lived in households that spent above the benchmark in each year between 2002 and 2004, while another 19% lived in households spending above the benchmark for either one or two years. The attributes associated with the highest probabilities of living in a household spending above the affordability benchmark were: living alone, being a female lone parent, renting, being an immigrant, or living in Vancouver or Toronto. In addition, those living in households experiencing some kind of transition between 2002 and 2004 period had a higher probability of exceeding the benchmark at least once during the period. Such transitions included renters with a change in rent-subsidy status, those who changed from owner to renter or vice versa, those who changed family type (for example, marrying or divorcing), and those who moved between cities. Notably, those experiencing these transitions did not exceed the benchmark persistently.

    Release date: 2008-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13
Data (2)

Data (2) ((2 results))

  • Table: 12F0080X
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of tabulations produced from the General Social Survey on time use of Canadians. It includes information on average amounts of time spent on various activities by sex, by age, by selected role groups.

    Release date: 2006-07-12

  • Table: 13-208-X
    Description:

    This publication shows the distribution of census families and persons not in families by size of income, major source of income, region/province, age, sex and other characteristics. The census family concept used is identical to that of the Canadian census. Statistics are derived from the Survey of Consumer Finances, conducted annually since 1972. Definitions and a bibliography are included.

    Release date: 1999-06-28
Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (0 to 10 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201900100003
    Description:

    This study uses the Census of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family to examine the characteristics of the population living alone in Canada. The demographic, socioeconomic and housing characteristics of persons who live alone are examined, as well as their conjugal history, family relationships, and well-being indicators.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019018
    Description:

    This infographic presents results from the 1981 and 2016 Censuses of Population and the 2017 General Social Survey on Family. The infographic depicts changes over time and provides selected characteristics of persons in Canada who lived alone in the reference years, including demographic statistics such as marital status, age and sex as well as statistics on future intentions to marry.

    Release date: 2019-03-06

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2018053
    Description:

    This infographic highlights some of the information provided by the 2017 Survey of Household Spending. It presents the annual average spending on selected expenditures by various household types, including one person households, couples with and without children and lone-parent households. It also includes the percentage of homeownership and vehicle ownership by household type.

    Release date: 2018-12-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-503-X
    Description:

    Understanding the role of women in Canadian society and how it has changed over time is dependent on having information that can begin to shed light on the diverse circumstances and experiences of women. Women in Canada provides an unparalleled compilation of data related to women's family status, education, employment, economic well-being, unpaid work, health, and more.

    Women in Canada allows readers to better understand the experience of women compared to that of men. Recognizing that women are not a homogenous group and that experiences differ not only across gender but also within gender groups, Women in Canada includes chapters on immigrant women, women in a visible minority, Aboriginal women, senior women, and women with participation and activity limitations.

    Release date: 2018-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201300111771
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many individuals are not married or in a common-law relationship, but are in a stable relationship without living under the same roof. These couples are 'living apart together.' How many individuals are in this situation in Canada? Is this type of relationship increasing? Are these relationships motivated by lifestyle choices?

    Release date: 2013-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211591
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article compares the personal networks of adults aged 25 to 64 living alone with those of adults living in a couple. It provides data on size of networks, frequency of contact and feelings of social loneliness. It also examines the extent to which people living alone are more likely to have personal networks of lower or higher quality than those living in a couple when various factors are taken into account. Data are from the 2008 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2011-11-30

  • Articles and reports: 75F0002M2008001
    Description:

    Shelter is the biggest expenditure most households make and its affordability can have an impact on the wellbeing of household members. For this reason, housing affordability is closely watched by a wide range of stakeholders - from housing advocates to policy analysts - interested in the welfare of Canadians. Measuring affordability involves comparing housing costs to a household's ability to meet them. One common measure is the shelter-cost-to-income-ratio (STIR). The 30% level is commonly accepted as the upper limit for affordable housing. Housing affordability is also a critical input to Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation's core housing need indicator which is used by governments to help design, deliver, fund and evaluate social housing programs. This report, jointly authored by Statistics Canada and CMHC, focuses purely on the dynamics of housing affordability, not on core housing need. It examines the likelihood of spending 30% or more of household income on shelter, how often this occurs, whether it is occasional or persistent, and contrasts those spending 30% or more to those spending less. Cross-sectional estimates indicate that around 19% of Canadians lived in households spending more than the affordability benchmark in 2002. Longitudinally however, less than 9% lived in households that spent above the benchmark in each year between 2002 and 2004, while another 19% lived in households spending above the benchmark for either one or two years. The attributes associated with the highest probabilities of living in a household spending above the affordability benchmark were: living alone, being a female lone parent, renting, being an immigrant, or living in Vancouver or Toronto. In addition, those living in households experiencing some kind of transition between 2002 and 2004 period had a higher probability of exceeding the benchmark at least once during the period. Such transitions included renters with a change in rent-subsidy status, those who changed from owner to renter or vice versa, those who changed family type (for example, marrying or divorcing), and those who moved between cities. Notably, those experiencing these transitions did not exceed the benchmark persistently.

    Release date: 2008-01-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-519-X
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This report depicts the demographic characteristics, health and wellness, living arrangements, social networks and social participation, security from crime and victimization, work patterns and related activities, income and expenditures, and lifestyles of the population aged 65 and over. It examines many of these issues, where data allow, in terms of different age groups within the senior population, for example those aged 65 to 74 and those aged 85 and over. Information are also presented for individuals in the 55 to 64 age range.

    The report also includes a chapter on Aboriginal seniors and a chapter on immigrant seniors.

    It presents the most comprehensive statistical picture of the situation of Canada's senior population with data drawn from a wide array of sources including the census, as well as other surveys such as the National Population Health Survey, General Social Survey, Canadian Community Health Survey, and Survey of Labour and Income dynamics.

    Release date: 2007-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050028451
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Age brings limitations that affect where, how and with whom people live. One of the concerns that seniors may face is affordable housing. This may be a particular concern for those seniors who lose a spouse and are faced with reduced household income while shelter costs remain unchanged. Using data from the 2001 Census of Population and the 2002 General Social Survey (GSS), this article looks at who seniors live with and the affordability of their homes.

    Release date: 2005-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050017941
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    We live in an aging society. And much has been written about how care will be provided to an aging population. We can't stop aging, and our capacity to affect our health as we age is limited, but the size, quality and proximity of people's social networks are arguably among the things that determine whether seniors receive formal care delivered by professionals, rely on informal care provided by family and friends or, indeed, receive no care at all.

    In this article, we look at the relationship between the social networks of non-institutionalized seniors and whether they receive formal, informal or no care.

    Release date: 2005-06-07
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