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All (11)

All (11) (0 to 10 of 11 results)

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019008
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on recent mothers who received maternity or parental benefits in Canada. Data from the 2017 Employment Insurance Coverage Survey are used to describe these mothers in terms of their distribution by age group, income, and the receipt of additional payments provided by an employer while on maternity or parental leave, among other characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154976
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Birth Database and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this study examines the relationship between fertility rates and labour force participation among women aged 15 to 44 in Ontario and in Quebec between 1996 and 2016, two provinces that followed different paths with respect to parental leave benefits and affordable child care over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2018-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017009
    Description:

    This document describes the procedures for using linked administrative data sources to estimate paid parental leave rates in Canada and the issues surrounding this use.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • 6. Employer top-ups Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market activity of mothers before and after the 2000 amendment to the Employment Insurance (EI) program. The amendment enables working parents to care for a newborn for a longer period of time, while still ensuring them secure re-entry into the labour market.

    Release date: 2003-06-18
Data (1)

Data (1) ((1 result))

  • Public use microdata: 12M0025X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 25 (2011) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 25 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    For the fifth time, in 2011, the General Social Survey (GSS) collected detailed information on families in Canada. Previous GSS surveys on this topic were conducted in 1990, 1995, 2001 and 2006. The 2011 survey updated most of the information collected in previous surveys, including leaving the family home, conjugal history (marriages, common-law unions, separations and divorces), children (biological, adopted or step), maternity and parental leave, childcare arrangements, intentions to form (or re-form) a union, fertility intentions, custody and financial support agreements and work history. As in all GSS surveys, data were also collected on the respondent's main activity, education and other socio-demographic characteristics. The 2011 GSS data can be used for cross-sectional and retrospective analyses (i.e. tracking the different family histories and trajectories followed by men and women).

    Release date: 2013-04-19
Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) ((10 results))

  • Stats in brief: 11-627-M2019008
    Description:

    This infographic presents data on recent mothers who received maternity or parental benefits in Canada. Data from the 2017 Employment Insurance Coverage Survey are used to describe these mothers in terms of their distribution by age group, income, and the receipt of additional payments provided by an employer while on maternity or parental leave, among other characteristics.

    Release date: 2019-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201800154976
    Description:

    Using data from the Canadian Vital Statistics Birth Database and from the Labour Force Survey (LFS), this study examines the relationship between fertility rates and labour force participation among women aged 15 to 44 in Ontario and in Quebec between 1996 and 2016, two provinces that followed different paths with respect to parental leave benefits and affordable child care over the past two decades.

    Release date: 2018-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-633-X2017009
    Description:

    This document describes the procedures for using linked administrative data sources to estimate paid parental leave rates in Canada and the issues surrounding this use.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200211697
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Many parents take time off work to care for a child after birth or adoption. Whether or not parents take leave and the duration of that leave may be influenced by characteristics such as parental employment or child and maternal health factors.

    This article examines children's experiences of parent-reported leave after their birth or adoption. In addition, associations between leave and parent employment and child and maternal health factors are analyzed using data from the 2010 Survey of Young Canadians.

    Release date: 2012-07-30

  • 5. Employer top-ups Archived
    Articles and reports: 75-001-X201010213243
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    To compensate for earnings lost by employees on leave, some employers provide parents with a Supplemental Unemployment Benefit (SUB), also known as a top-up. The SUB is a government initiative that employers use as a means of reducing the net earnings loss of their employees on leave. This article examines who is likely to receive a top-up and whether the benefit influences mother's return-to-work behaviour.

    Release date: 2010-03-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900210919
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines whether access to maternity and paternity benefits influences a couple's decision to have a child. We identify characteristics of people who are most likely to say that benefits would transform intentions into behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200810613211
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    In 2001, shareable parental leave benefits under the federal Parental Benefits Program increased from 10 to 35 weeks, and in 2006 Quebec introduced its Parental Insurance Program. These changes led to a significant increase in the number of fathers claiming paid parental leave benefits. Between 2000 and 2006, the proportion of fathers claiming parental benefits jumped from 3% to 20%. The most common reasons for fathers not claiming the benefits were family choice, difficulty taking time off work and financial issues.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313087
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market activity of mothers before and after the 2000 amendment to the Employment Insurance (EI) program. The amendment enables working parents to care for a newborn for a longer period of time, while still ensuring them secure re-entry into the labour market.

    Release date: 2003-06-18

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200310313088
    Geography: Canada
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the statistics compiled from Human Resources and Development Canada data to determine whether new parents have responded to recent changes to the maternity, parental and adoption benefits available under the Employment Insurance program.

    Release date: 2003-06-18
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